War Memorials

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer
I always find this one worth looking at, with so much detail on a relatively simple structure.

LR From the Arch 2.jpg
 

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer
No memorial as such, but this is a lone war grave in a small Lincolnshire Village in the shadow of RAF Scampton. The grave is that of the pilot of a Hampden Bomber severely damaged by flak on a mission over Antwerp. The pilot instructed the 3 crew to bale out of which 2 members did successfully. The 3rd member of the crew was not so lucky. Sgt Hannah, the wireless operator/gunner fought the flames that engulfed the fuselage, losing his parachute to the fire. Despite serious burns he continued to fight the fire, and the Pilot, Flying Officer C A O Connor, a Canadian who came to Britain to join the RAF, successfully landed the badly damaged aircraft at Scampton. Sgt Hannah was awarded the Victoria Cross for his bravery in saving the aircraft, FO Connor was awarded the DFC for his actions in recovering the aircraft. Had he had a commissioned officer aboard to witness this feat he would have been awarded a VC.
Sgt Hannah and FO Connor attended Buckingham Palace to receive their medals, there is newsreel of this.

FO Connor went back to flying, and was subsequently shot down over the North Sea on a raid about 3 weeks later and killed. At the time the Brattleby Churchyard of St Cuthberts was nearest to Scampton so he was buried there, the vicar was conscious of the problem of many more deaths happening at Scampton and so arranged for
future burials to take place in the churchyard of Scampton Village.
 

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ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer
I've never seen that particular Commonwealth War Grave sign before.


Is it relatively new?

I ask because I have not seen it in any churchyards with CWGC graves in the past.
 
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I've never seen that particular Commonwealth War Grave sign before.


Is it relatively new?

I ask because I have not seen it in churchyards CWGC graves in the past.
I thought the same until last year when I was driving through Pembroke Dock and noticed a sign very similar.
After a bit of research I've now discovered there's CWGC plot's up the road from me in Cardiff. Few poles and Dutch I think are listed which to me seem's odd.
 
I've never seen that particular Commonwealth War Grave sign before.


Is it relatively new?

I ask because I have not seen it in churchyards CWGC graves in the past.
I guess the sign is relatively recent as it has a web address on it! I'm not sure about how old the sign is, or whether it has been there since WW2. I have driven past this site many times and not known about the presence of the church!
 
Dads brother was a merchant seaman on the arctic convoys, so whoever gave this a bullshit, F*ck you.. they deserve their memorial as much as any soldier, sailor or airman



Agreed, lets hope "[U]medwaymud[/U]" made a mistake & didn't mean to give the negative button.
My own cousin,15 yrs old, was one of these, losing his life in 1939 in I think the first month of the war.
These men/boys deserve all the recognition we can give them. Many people forget that until May 1941 merchant seamen sailing aboard British vessels attacked and sunk by enemy action received no pay (wages) from the moment that their ship sank. If the seaman was fortunate to survive the sinking only to spend days or weeks in an open lifeboat hoping for rescue, it was regarded as "non-working time" and the seaman was not paid for that time"
 
Agreed, lets hope "[U]medwaymud[/U]" made a mistake & didn't mean to give the negative button.
My own cousin,15 yrs old, was one of these, losing his life in 1939 in I think the first month of the war.
These men/boys deserve all the recognition we can give them. Many people forget that until May 1941 merchant seamen sailing aboard British vessels attacked and sunk by enemy action received no pay (wages) from the moment that their ship sank. If the seaman was fortunate to survive the sinking only to spend days or weeks in an open lifeboat hoping for rescue, it was regarded as "non-working time" and the seaman was not paid for that time"
Yeah maybe that was the case, I was aware that they were given grief by the great british public for not being in uniform and to be fair its always boiled my piss. In recent times I had the honour of meeting another Arctic convoy veteran ( 22 trips from Liverpool to Murmansk/Archangel ) and telling me about using picks to chip off the 2 ft of ice covering their decks, as well as seeing ships hit and sunk, and not being able to stop for survivors.. I think in some ways they had a harder war than most. So yeah, they deserve the thanks , respect and any memorials that people wish to erect to them. Apologies to the OP if indeed it was an error, if it wasn't, then my original comment stands
 
My first boss when I went to sea lied about his age, spent 3 months learning morse and was 'on the convoys' by the age of 16.

"Merchant seamen crewed the merchant ships of the British Merchant Navy which kept the United Kingdom supplied with raw materials, arms, ammunition, fuel, food and all of the necessities of a nation at war throughout World War II literally enabling the country to defend itself. In doing this they sustained a considerably greater casualty rate than almost every branch of the armed services and suffered great hardship. Seamen were aged from fourteen through to their late seventies.[1]

The office of the Registrar General of Shipping and Seamen calculated that 144,000 merchant seamen were serving aboard British registered merchant ships at the outbreak of World War II and that up to 185,000 men and women served in the Merchant Navy during the wartime.[2][3] 36,749 seamen and women were lost by enemy action, 5,720 were taken prisoner and 4,707 were wounded, totaling 47,176 casualties, a minimum casualty rate of over 25 percent. Mr Gabe Thomas, the former Registrar General of Shipping and Seaman (Great Britain) stated that "27 percent of merchant seamen died through enemy action".

British merchant seamen of World War II - Wikipedia
 
Rood beam.
the beam at the entrance of a church chancel that supports a large cross or crucifix especially in a medieval church.
Put that down to being blind :(
 
Chester Cathedral earlier this year

Chester 1.jpg
chester 2.jpg
Chester 3.jpg
Chester 4.jpg
 
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