War and media coverage

Discussion in 'Multinational HQ' started by Devil_Dog, Aug 17, 2008.

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  1. There have been some very dramatic pictures of the pain of war coming out of Georgia. Some of them are stark and really moving. The picture below of a Georgian woman screaming in pain really brings this down to a level most humans who have been close enough to an armed conflict can relate to.

    This picture has become emblematic of Russian savagery, at least where I live. People, many people say, "did you see that woman who was bleeding all over?" Or a variation of the same theme.

    The aim here, at least from a purely propagandic point of view is to paint the Russians as a bunch of inhuman brutes who do not shy away from killing women and children.

    These very dramatic pictures of Russian excesses have been running in all front pages of big papers with TV coverage to match.

    More than five years ago when we invaded Iraq, none of these played out loud. All I remember seeing were romantic pictures of coalition troops, serenely silhouetted against a setting sun, as the natives threw away their shackles and embraced freedom.

    In the three weeks of 'shock and awe', and the fiasco that followed afterwards, I am sure some innocent Iraqi took a bullet or two from us. Or some five year old got blown up by a million dollar missile from a state of the art fighter plane.

    Yet, I do not remember seeing the pictures in my local paper.
     

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  2. Not going to bite...
     
  3. Uncomfortable with the truth today, aren't we?
     
  4. The mongoloid Russians are inhuman pieces of walking filth. They don't have to be "painted" that way by the media because Russians are natural born primitives and barbarians. There are plenty of Russians polluting this world and they are mostly criminal vermin, humorless swine, crass and vulgar curs, wife-beating scum, dirty filthy stinking whores, and drunken puddles of cretinous Slavic vomit and excrescence.



    :D
     
  5. Now don't sit on the fence!! :D
     
  6. Me thinks you are all missing the point.

    Pictures that we have seen in international papers have not been flattering to the Ruskies.

    The bigger point is: would these pictures be palatable to the West if they had come out of Astan, Iraq or even (God forbid) Kosovo?
     
  7. I've seen plenty of unflattering photos (and plenty of negative stories) of US troops and collateral damage in Iraq and Afghanistan posted in newspapers, magazines, and on the internet. God knows the shit-brained US newsmedia wants desperately to print photos of US flag draped coffins.

    If the Russians don't like unflattering photos of themselves then they should hire Annie Leibowitz as their official "Rape and Pillage of Georgia" photographer. They'd look hip and trendy.
     
  8. First of all I am not Russian.

    Secondly, pictures that are coming out of Georgia would not see the light of day if they were coming out of Iraq or Astan.

    We are (as the West) delighted to see dead people in 'other' wars but we we do not let ourselves confront the reality that death is a horrible thing.

    On both sides.
     
  9. I can't imagine what kind of grave-diggers you're hanging around with because I don't like seeing dead people at all... :eek:
     
  10. We have little freedom to wander around and film where ever we want when we are attached or 'embedded' with NATO troops. There are many good OPSEC reasons for this which we respect. Largely the British Armed forces are accommodating where they can be but the quid pro quo is that we can be 'on message' for them. Releasing images that are not approved will get you 'hamstrung'

    If we are covering wars involving 'foreigners' we tool around wherever we please and film whatever we can (subject to the injury/death factor)

    I've said this before but speaking as a fairly experienced cameraman who has operated in a number of war zones/hostile environments:

    I do not think the public need or have automatic rights to see how our armed forces operate during time of war.

    I don't mean ignore the efforts of our servicemen and women - rather let them get on with it. Ive seen it though a viewfinder in many countries and war is not pretty it and it's not a fecking computer game and what one human being HAS to do to another at such times should (with exceptions) stay in the field.