Wanting to leave

You even get a front seat view of someone turning into pink mist when they decide to step in front of you when you're doing 100 mph.
Do you get a bonus for that, or is it considered a non-taxable benefit?
 
One other caution for the OP, UK workplaces have been following the US on the path of team building and corporate fun etc. If you want an insight on what this means check out the link. And don't think that this is confined to media companies or the like, it is spreading like COVID but there is no vaccination, if you don't want to suffer then you must avoid.

To experience this kind of (compulsory) hideous and embarrassing nonsense is far worse than seeing it. I hated every minute of it, particularly the team building days, hell on earth I tell you.

 
Not moving back to Northern Ireland, Mrs is English, and not the best career for knowing everything your time isn't actually yours weekend can be cancelled, ect, atleast I get what you mean on stability though especially during this, hence why I'm waiting till after to start looking at better options, don't get me wrong I like the army but everyone says army first family a close second, family is always first in my book
After 24 years service, putting Army first and family second was my way of putting family first. You show commitment, dedication, loyalty, determination, and sheer hard work, you are rewarded with opportunities for progression up the ranks, decent pay at the senior rank, a lump sum and very good pension.

This attitude provided the good standard of living and financial security in the future for wife and family.

You are looking short term. And you WILL regret it if you leave...
 
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After 24 years service, putting Army first and family second was my way of putting family first. You show commitment, dedication, loyalty, determination, and sheer hard work, you are rewarded with opportunities for progression up the ranks, decent pay at the senior rank, a lump sum and very good pension.

This attitude provided the good standard of living and financial security in the future fir wife and family.

You are looking short term. And you WILL regret it if you leave...
I beg to differ. My 9 years was enough, toward the end of my time, having to suffer 19 year old subalterns, and institutionalized SNCO's who quite frankly,whose antics would never be tolerated in a civvie company, i left before that mindset kicked in. Resuming my previous occupation, my military service never in any way helped in civvie street, only that i was never late for work, and when asked, went that extra mile. I did not at any time regret leaving. It was just another chapter in my life, which i look back on very fondly.
 
I beg to differ. My 9 years was enough, toward the end of my time, having to suffer 19 year old subalterns, and institutionalized SNCO's who quite frankly,whose antics would never be tolerated in a civvie company, i left before that mindset kicked in. Resuming my previous occupation, my military service never in any way helped in civvie street, only that i was never late for work, and when asked, went that extra mile. I did not at any time regret leaving. It was just another chapter in my life, which i look back on very fondly.
Horses for courses I suppose. I took pride in educating 19 year old subaltern officers in how to become respected future leaders, and in turn earned their respect, which in turn reaped the rewards later down the line.
WRT the institutionalised SNCO's they were part of the fabric that made the Army work. It all depends on whether or not you like the way it works.

You obviously didn't while I did.
 

RTU'd

War Hero
You want to leave a safe job, with free pension, semi decent accommodation & promotion?
Why do this, covid has wrecked industry with some very highly trained people now UB40.
 
It depends on where you look. My employer has a global programme aimed at ex forces personnel and we have people with backgrounds from Lance Jack to Colenel and beyond.

Is that of their own volition or as a signatory to the Corporate Covenant?
 
Is that of their own volition or as a signatory to the Corporate Covenant?
They've been doing it of their own volition for years but then they are American, and the COO is ex US Navy. They became signatories to the Covenant a few years ago and as far as I’m aware have a good history of supporting Reservists who’ve gone on ops.
 
They've been doing it of their own volition for years but then they are American, and the COO is ex US Navy. They became signatories to the Covenant a few years ago and as far as I’m aware have a good history of supporting Reservists who’ve gone on ops.

The Covenant has been in place since 2013.

I’m quite interested to see which companies recognise the potential in military applicants.
 
It depends on where you look. My employer has a global programme aimed at ex forces personnel and we have people with backgrounds from Lance Jack to Colenel and beyond.
There are notable exceptions. Amazon have a number of veteran placement managers. I know one of them and she is a top operator, ex RN.
 

dan_brown

War Hero
Lasted 4 years with the army - Granby, NI, BAOR, but threw it all away when i became c*** struck and she wanted me out.

I lasted a year in civvy st where she did the dirty (lots of dirty!) and i learned i hated the mundane, repetitive crud of civvy life.

12 months later i did what most of the army bods want to do and joined the RAF - 24 years later i am still here and in 3yrs time i am looking forward to semi-retirement at 52 with 30+years service/pension/lump sum.

But each to their own, the OP has to make their own decisions and mistakes; if you listen to the advice here, you may end up not making the same ones some of us did.
 
Lasted 4 years with the army - Granby, NI, BAOR, but threw it all away when i became c*** struck and she wanted me out.

I lasted a year in civvy st where she did the dirty (lots of dirty!) and i learned i hated the mundane, repetitive crud of civvy life.

12 months later i did what most of the army bods want to do and joined the RAF - 24 years later i am still here and in 3yrs time i am looking forward to semi-retirement at 52 with 30+years service/pension/lump sum.

But each to their own, the OP has to make their own decisions and mistakes; if you listen to the advice here, you may end up not making the same ones some of us did.

Out of interest, what was your capbadge in the Army and your subsequent trade/branch in the RAF?
 

Norn_ireland

Swinger
I beg to differ. My 9 years was enough, toward the end of my time, having to suffer 19 year old subalterns, and institutionalized SNCO's who quite frankly,whose antics would never be tolerated in a civvie company, i left before that mindset kicked in. Resuming my previous occupation, my military service never in any way helped in civvie street, only that i was never late for work, and when asked, went that extra mile. I did not at any time regret leaving. It was just another chapter in my life, which i look back on very fondly.
This is exactly what I'm feeling thank you for your insight!
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
Stay in do a short easy working career get your pension. Civvy st is harder and requires a lot more self discipline and you don't get a pension till you are ready to be boxed up. Unless you have something good set up it will be same shit different day. Do your 22 which in hindsight is NOT a long time.
The army must have changed a lot since I was in, 70’s/early 80’s. Best thing I did was to get out. If one is unhappy do something about it and act.
Now the question is what can the OP do? After all we know FA about him, or her.
 
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