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Wanting to leave

Fortune favours the brave.

You never served on F94... I did :)

And anyways...some people go through life falling into a bucket of tits and end up coming out-sucking their thumb.

I'm sure you can agree your experience is somewhat different to "average".
You could get thrown into a haystack and would come out with a diamond encrusted needle sticking out your left arse cheek.
 
So I want to end my service soon after the covid situation is under control as, I have a baby on the way and want them to live a normal life, and be around them as much as possible, so what I am wondering is what's a good career to get into on civy Street with good pay?
Have you considered PSNI ? If you are planning to return to NI (or already there).
 
So I want to end my service soon after the covid situation is under control as, I have a baby on the way and want them to live a normal life, and be around them as much as possible, so what I am wondering is what's a good career to get into on civy Street with good pay?

There’s a lot of good advice given already, much of it focused on you staying in. It is fully understandable that if you’ve already made the decision to leave the idea of staying in will not sit well with you. Possibly what you could consider is delaying leaving, but have a plan aimed towards life in civvy street that you can aim towards whilst serving. It could be two years or more, but provided you are working towards that plan it will feel like you are leaving whilst setting yourself up to succeed.

Look at your education and training options within the Army, you have your ELCs and the Army will pay for your first degree, if you don’t already have one.

Make some enquiries in civvy street with regards to what interests you, the work towards it. Use resettlement magazines such as quest, it’s full of opportunities and ideas.

If don’t want to have to wait then look at industries and services that support the Armed Forces, three I know of are the NHS, Universities and the Banking Sector (look for Barclay’s AFTER Program).

Good Luck.
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Sorry to disagree with you, the difference to 2008 is, that at this time COVID-19
and high unemployment is making it a lot harder to get a job,
He is better to stay where he is at the moment
The unemployment rate was just as bad in 2008 as it is now.

The unemployment rate in 2010 / 11 and 12 was actually a lot higher than both now and in 2008.

Certain industries are affected more than others. In 2008 it was banking and real estate, now it’s leisure and tourism.

Granted, now certainly wouldn’t be the time to leave the Army and start a career in hospitality, but the overall unemployment rate is no worse than it’s been in recent years.

 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
As a civvi, I can tell you that many companies are likely to be cutting back on training, cutting back on staff without multiple skills, and in many cases closing regional branches in order to survive
So unless you have a very specific skillset that will command a decent wage, I would strongly reccoemdn that you stay put, work hard and think about it again in 5 years time, even then the country will still only be getting back on its feet
one of my oldest friends runs a large company, as older staff retire, they are not being replaced, he is looking at running the company on 50 percent of the workforce he had before, and only bringing people in on short term contracts as and when needed, also existing staff are being asked to multitask and many of them are learning new skills, and covering other workloads
you are getting paid, housing, access to training, and topping up your pension stick at it
 

anglo

LE
The unemployment rate was just as bad in 2008 as it is now.

The unemployment rate in 2010 / 11 and 12 was actually a lot higher than both now and in 2008.

Certain industries are affected more than others. In 2008 it was banking and real estate, now it’s leisure and tourism.

Granted, now certainly wouldn’t be the time to leave the Army and start a career in hospitality, but the overall unemployment rate is no worse than it’s been in recent years.

When furlough finishes unemployment is going to go through the roof,
and Covid 19 is certainly not going to help the situation
 
Also do not fall for what many did during the hagiography of the forces during the Afghanistan years- thinking that anyone will place significant value on being ex-forces. It doesn't work that way.

The truth is-you'll either be seen as a threat on account of having had more life experience than them or- you'll bore the tits off them narrating stories of derring-do.

Civvie workplaces dont work like the forces-where workmates can be relied upon if anything hits the fan.
There are very rarely any "real" friends in a civvy workplace. In so9me sectors there are exceptions. It took me a while to realise that. Its dog eat dog and if you are better than anyone in any way-you WILL be seen as a direct threat...even though they;'ll give you the impression they think the sun shines out of your arse.

Stay put for your, your mrs and your child's sake.
Its too uncertain out here in civvy st at the moment-as many have said-thousands are out of work, and thousands have CVs with all sort of bullshit entries that might actually appeal to 'bosses' who thrive on that sort of stuff.

Quick example: In the refs room one day not too long ago, some bright young thing was holding court about the "Mental" night out he'd had on his rest days. The punchline was something along the lines of "And I was soooooo drunk I missed my mouth with my drink and poured it down my shirt....and I was nearly sick in the taxi home!" That dit drew 100% attention of some people and they found it hillarious.
Mentally I was going to myself "Keep quiet..keep fecking quiet...nah, no point spinning that dit...they wont get it...just go for a shit instead".
This in spades! The outside world hates ex-squaddies! I went to a call for something minor and the Control Room were giving me the run down on the person. They came up with 'potential PTSD as he's ex-Army' I asked for clarification and they said 'nothing specific but a previous call mentions he's ex-Army so potential PTSD and violence' again I asked why 'Well, he's ex Army' My reply was 'So am I'

No one will ever, ever pay you as much for the work you do. Stay put!
 
This in spades! The outside world hates ex-squaddies! I went to a call for something minor and the Control Room were giving me the run down on the person. They came up with 'potential PTSD as he's ex-Army' I asked for clarification and they said 'nothing specific but a previous call mentions he's ex-Army so potential PTSD and violence' again I asked why 'Well, he's ex Army' My reply was 'So am I'
And now you know why they don't trust you with a Taser.
 
I assure you, it fücking doesn‘t.
Yeah but - you got a street named after you for doing your involuntary backflips. How fortunate is that?
 
Depends on your skill set , if you like hands on technical stuff train as a heating engineer , gas will make you good money now but also get up to speed eco green systems , then there's an electrician , both will transfer across to being self employed when you've got the experience , both trades make good money and are future proof.

If a desk jockey type job appeals look at banking /finance , big money can be made if you are good.

Remember , going to Uni is easy even if you left school with no qualifications , age and life experience will get you in , dont worry about fee`s as you dont have to pay them back unless you start to earn reasonable money so you cant lose, you can also get living expense grants quite easily.
 
So I want to end my service soon after the covid situation is under control as, I have a baby on the way and want them to live a normal life, and be around them as much as possible, so what I am wondering is what's a good career to get into on civy Street with good pay?

Alright, serious questions for you to consider:

1. What do you do now?

2. What level are you at now?

3. What would you like to do, ie. van driver, security guard, general clerical body, warehouse work, or climb the greasy corporate pole and make some serious wonga?

4. What qualifications do you have to get you to where you would like to be?

You cannot just say, "I'm leaving the army to become a civvy". Well you can, but it helps if you have a final destination in mind and know the steps you need to take to get there. I've seen Warrant Officers leave and end up working behind the car parts counter in a dealership, and I've seen NCO's to WO's leave and get into banking and earn 6 figures within two or three years. But, the one's who went into banking bothered to get a qualification, or two to help grease their path.
 
What chances of world travel were there from the eighties onwards. BAOR with the odd trip to Canada and tour of NI. Very few got the chance of a tour of Hong Kong.
Doing a bit better at school tended to not get the "Army careers office is just down there-3rd on the right, look for the bloke who looks a bit like Jim McDonald off Corry 'Orry" advice - when stepping into an RN careers office. ;)
 

Wee Hawken

Old-Salt
If you're really looking at getting out....

Cyber. Get yourself skilled-up, qualified and competent. There is plenty of work out there and it's changing all the time.
 
I think the crux of the matter is-dont fly the nest until you have a solid and comfortable grounding to land on.
 
I think the crux of the matter is-dont fly the nest until you have a solid and comfortable grounding to land on.

Original post deleted as it turned out to be a waste of good data space.
 
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You need a goal, and to get to that goal you need a plan.

Your plan needs to be pointed at something you will be happy doing for the rest of your working life, and a job that will exist in 10, 20, 30 years.

A qualification of some value will help you get to your target, and it will also let you find out if you actually like what you might be doing.

Take me for example; when I left I went to uni and picked up a couple of degrees in IT/IS, all the rage back then, far king good money, and destined to be the future. I was good at the learning part, I even came up with a couple of software widgets that many people take for granted nowadays, did some expensive consultancy for a couple of banks. BUT, even though I had some nice expensive Austin Reed suits I was not cut out to be the suit wearing type, who sits behind a desk every day........it wore thin very quickly. I much more enjoyed fixing up houses, working with my hands and not dependent on the foibles of other people. I went off to college and got a city and guilds plumbing, advanced plumbing, gas certified, and WRAS certified, did a couple of evening class courses, one in brickying, and the other in plastering. And, because I actually like learning I did the sparkys course over here in the US where I live now, and at the moment I'm doing an undergraduate construction management course by distance learning.

Then there is my Mrs; she was in mid level admin jobs and would have stayed stuck there without a degree. So she sat down and mapped out a pathway to climb the greasy corporate ladder to the top of her profession in HR. She got her degree at 32 (full time), quickly followed by an MBA (part time), she already had her professional qualification as a member of the institute of personnel and development (MIPD), her MBA bumped that up to Fellowship. She also did some work sponsored courses in psychological testing, behavioural interviewing, employment law. At the same time she was getting more qualifications she would look for the next job up the ladder every two to three years, eventually she was well known enough so that headhunters called her. She likes admin, go figure.

My point being; I jumped in thinking, "yeah I can do that". But, I hated it when it came down to it. I should have really sat back and thought for a while and if I had followed my interests I would have either become a Porsche mechanic, or studied construction at uni. Whereas my Mrs excels at admin, people management, and corporate politics.........FFS I can't even balance the chequebook.

So have a serious think - have a goal - make a plan.
And whatever you do-and Ive seen people do it...DO NOT listen to your mate 'Dave' who works at the local settee factory or whatever where you live with his "Don't worry...they'll snap you up..it's a right crack here it is...I know the supervisor too and...you'll be sorted!"
 
So I want to end my service soon after the covid situation is under control as, I have a baby on the way and want them to live a normal life, and be around them as much as possible, so what I am wondering is what's a good career to get into on civy Street with good pay?

Does your Corps, Regiment or Whatever have an association with a careers type (preferably a regional one for the area you want)? I would consult them.
 
And whatever you do-and Ive seen people do it...DO NOT listen to your mate 'Dave' who works at the local settee factory or whatever where you live with his "Don't worry...they'll snap you up..it's a right crack here it is...I know the supervisor too and...you'll be sorted!"

And regret it for the rest of your life.
 
So I want to end my service soon after the covid situation is under control as, I have a baby on the way and want them to live a normal life, and be around them as much as possible, so what I am wondering is what's a good career to get into on civy Street with good pay?
You'd be better staying put until well after covid ends, too much uncertainty to plan anything right now. Hope it all goes well for you though mate, will always have a place in the army if you need it.
 

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