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Wanting to leave

Also do not fall for what many did during the hagiography of the forces during the Afghanistan years- thinking that anyone will place significant value on being ex-forces. It doesn't work that way.

The truth is-you'll either be seen as a threat on account of having had more life experience than them or- you'll bore the tits off them narrating stories of derring-do.

Civvie workplaces dont work like the forces-where workmates can be relied upon if anything hits the fan.
There are very rarely any "real" friends in a civvy workplace. In so9me sectors there are exceptions. It took me a while to realise that. Its dog eat dog and if you are better than anyone in any way-you WILL be seen as a direct threat...even though they;'ll give you the impression they think the sun shines out of your arse.

Stay put for your, your mrs and your child's sake.
Its too uncertain out here in civvy st at the moment-as many have said-thousands are out of work, and thousands have CVs with all sort of bullshit entries that might actually appeal to 'bosses' who thrive on that sort of stuff.
This I work for the NHS. You would think that being ex forces stands you in good stead.

Far from it. Management where I work see ex forces as a threat to everyone. No shit, EVERY ex forces bod is viewed with suspicion and the HR department are trying to get forces people out of the organisation by any means possible.

A Forces background can be a distinct disadvantage these days
 
This I work for the NHS. You would think that being ex forces stands you in good stead.

Far from it. Management where I work see ex forces as a threat to everyone. No shit, EVERY ex forces bod is viewed with suspicion and the HR department are trying to get forces people out of the organisation by any means possible.

A Forces background can be a distinct disadvantage these days
Lad in Glasgow I know is Ex-Army. Left after 8-9 years, went to Afghan etc. He joined a "low level" securtity firm as a mobile guard. Within the management and supervisor structure of that firm are a few who consider themselves as "hardmen"-on account of maybe working a few doors etc...in the early nineties.
If he so much as farts out of tune they are on him like a tramp on chips. Any good ideas about improvements to rostering / organisation etc are met with "wind your neck in-stop being negative...you're not in the army the noo" type response.
As you can imagine-he feels very disenfranchised and...let down because...he did actually believe people would value his former service.
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
Almost 2,000,000 unemployed in the UK, with more added to the list daily, especially young people. More businesses are closing or contracting in size, very few are growing.

If you want to work for McDonalds or Amazon at the very lowest entry level position you will be fighting probably hundreds of people, many of whom will have University Degrees, or have been Apprentices with skills aplenty.

You have a decently paying job that houses you adequately. Work hard, be reliable and do the right courses and you will have advancement which will bring you better and better wages. OK, so the chances of world travel aren't there as much as we oldies had, but think really hard about what you actually have, and what you can actually offer a prospective employer. Because simply being ex-forces, or a Veteran isn't going to impress any HR Drone when they sift the 100s of CVs they receive for every single menial post.
 
So I want to end my service soon after the covid situation is under control as, I have a baby on the way and want them to live a normal life, and be around them as much as possible, so what I am wondering is what's a good career to get into on civy Street with good pay?
You can try the Metropolitan Police if you don't have any criminal convictions. Its a secure career up to the age of 60 with a better pension than the military. Your army pensionable service can be carried over. A few years back you needed an address in London before you could apply, I don't know if that is still the case. After a few years in the Met you could transfer into a county force if their are any vacancies. There are also civilian police staff jobs available like 'jailor in custody suites,' or in the Comms centre at Hendon.
 

miner69er

Old-Salt
Correct as above. But if you are determined to get out then start to plan it - but have a 3 year plan and max out as much as you can on getting civvy experience. It will open your eyes and add to your decision making.
I came out and got into FM and did alright by it - but I was very very lucky in the firm that I worked for valued me for the get up and go attitude, whereas what Old Stab says is very true and I have the bitter experience of that as well.
Paramedics are also needed on an ongoing basis as to many snowlflakes are burning out. So take your 3 year plan and sit with her indoors as she can contribute loads - who knows you may end up being a house husband and have the best job in the world - seeing your little one grow.
Best of luck fella on whatever decision you make
Faugh A' Ballagh
 
So I want to end my service soon after the covid situation is under control as, I have a baby on the way and want them to live a normal life, and be around them as much as possible, so what I am wondering is what's a good career to get into on civy Street with good pay?
How on earth do you expect a sensible answer when you've given nobody anything to go on? After all, a neurosurgeon would be a good career choice and well paid but I suspect you don't have the qualifications or experience to jump straight into that as a career immediately after leaving the army. Do you see where I'm going with this?

You may get some good advice here if you tell us what trade you are, what experience and qualifications you have. Do you want to work in the same area or do you want a complete change in career direction? Have you done any research into your chosen career and understand what the salary is and qualification requirements are for a new starter?

As others have said, the pragmatic choice in the current climate is to stay where you are. I would suggest focusing on promotion and gaining experience and qualifications. Get as many buckshee courses under your belt as possible. Don't be the bloke that drips and whines at everything but get out there and be the bloke that is enthusiastic and reliable instead.

If you have an idea what it is that you'd like to do in the future find out what it is that is required and work towards it. It may be that you need an appropriate university degree, a particular diploma or other paper qualification and if so do those courses. If you require a certain level of practical experience see if you can negotiate some time off to get that experience. Volunteering may help with that.

Let's face it - squaddies leaving the army are ten-a-penny. The same applies for matelots and crabs. Employees have hundreds of applicants to choose from and just because you have served it doesn't mean that you will automatically stroll into your dream job just by dint of having worn the Queen's uniform. You'll be going up against plenty of civvies who are as well if not better qualified than you. Given the effects on employment due to Covid you will be up against a lot more people that may already have years of relevant experience. This is going to have a long-term effect.

How many years have you done? If you've got a fair few under your belt it may be worth hanging on some more and get your immediate pension out of it. It is a great comfort blanket to have some guaranteed income every month and really does help with the bills when times are tough.

Whatever you decide to do have a clear idea of your goals and what is required to achieve them. Don't just leave the mob on a whim and expect everything to land at your feet, all hunky dory. You will have to work and plan for it and that might take a little bit of time and investment.

What is it that you really want to do when you leave the mob? If you can't answer that then don't leave.
 
And dont forget- @Toastie on here who you might not know is an airline captain- has commented many times how many of his pilot colleagues during COVID have taken on work at Tesco etc just to keep putting food on the table. Thats what you could be up against.
You'd be bloody stupid to throw away what you currently have in times like these.
 
Just to build on as others have mentioned, you haven't given any insight into your current role and years of service to date. So maybe, and this will not necessarily give you more family time than you are already getting, but if you are not Corps you could look at what each of them does and ask for a transfer to something that takes your fancy. This move is, of course, about finding a job you like while in and might help you on a career path when out.

We had plenty of others join REME from some other badge and they were just as likely to do well as those who came in off the street as it were. In some ways of course you will be ahead of the game for those in their first tranche of trade training as there is still military stuff to be done and you will have a better grounding in that than them.
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Have you considered joining the Royal Navy?

It’s ******* great.
 
@Norn_ireland
A long read, sorry:

In essence unemployment has, today, reached 5.1%. Every job is like gold dust, especially in some less affluent areas. Your job, don't ever forget, includes unlimited medical and dental cover, sports and gym facilities, highly subsidised food and social clubs oh, and excellent crèche facilities for that kid you are about to have.

Consider your position very, very, carefully.
Grass and greener, and all that.
 
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As someone in the civvy world, with decent career prospects due to having worked in Aerospace and Marine manufacturing. I'd advise you to stay in for the next few years at least. I'm currently working here and there and haven't had any work these past 4 weeks.

There is very little work out there in my fields and any jobs that there are, has hundreds of applicants throwing CV's at them.
The dole aren't even chasing folk to sign on or even show that they are even looking for work, which shows how serious the unemployment problem is in the UK at present. They are just dealing with bucket loads of new claims for unemployment benefits.

You'll find everyone in civvy street is out to stab you in the back.. past experience showed me that folks you regarded as close friends in work, would stab you in the back for a bit of overtime or throw you to the wolves for a sniff of at a promotion.

It's definitely a Dog eat Dog world. You have secure employment at the minute, regard that as a blessing.
 
with a wife and new baby, don't even think about trucking, the hours are long and the pay not so great nowadays.
Security work ditto, so don't bother.
Forget agency work too, they'll flog you to death on hours but feck you off the first time you're not available.
if you have relevent skills, go civil service, if not go back into education.
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Serious hat on for a sec. Here’s an opinion that goes against most of the other replies on this thread.

I left the mob 4 months before the global recession of 2008. It was shit, I got made redundant from my new civvy job and it was certainly twitchy bum time for a bit while I sorted my shit out.

But I dug out like ****, sent my CV to literally everyone and applied for hundreds of jobs.

And as luck would have it, I got a bloody good one that springboarded me to senior management and eventual progression to becoming a Chartered Engineer. Not bad considering I left the RN as an AB (LCpl equivalent).

It is possible to thrive in civvy street if you have your head screwed on and work hard. You also need to get your head into the civvy work mindset.

You’ll meet millions of bitter ex squaddies who think all civvies are back stabbing cnuts. This simply isn’t true, they’ve just failed to fit in and are blaming their failings on everyone around them. There are just as many backstabbing cnuts in the forces and in all walks of life, you just need to work out how to deal with them.

I’d say go for it if that’s what your heart is set on. Use your resettlement to your advantage, work hard and seamless transfer to the reserves so you have a quick way back in if everything goes to pot in civvy street.

Fortune favours the brave.
 
This I work for the NHS. You would think that being ex forces stands you in good stead.

Far from it. Management where I work see ex forces as a threat to everyone. No shit, EVERY ex forces bod is viewed with suspicion and the HR department are trying to get forces people out of the organisation by any means possible.

A Forces background can be a distinct disadvantage these days
Probably an exception to the rule but the job I'm currently in is full of ex-forces, at least out of the offices I work in. Mainly ex army - REME, Royal Sigs, Int Corps & RMP. We also have an ex booty and a couple of ex matelots including myself. A couple of the guys are currently STABs. We have an ex-copper and ex police staff that did some tasty stuff although they weren't actually plod. We don't have any ex crabs but then again the gates to our car park are electronically activated so not really needed. In our organisation I think being ex forces/police is a distinct advantage and I believe there are plenty in the wider organisation.

To your wider point I agree. I think most civvy employers don't have large enough numbers of ex forces in their workplaces and as our former occupation was more of a way of life rather than just a job I don't think pure civvies really understand and appreciate the particular culture and outlook on life that we bring. They will always be outsiders and some may be a little resentful of it.

“Every man thinks meanly of himself for not having been a soldier, or not having been at sea.”
 

anglo

LE
Serious hat on for a sec. Here’s an opinion that goes against most of the other replies on this thread.

I left the mob 4 months before the global recession of 2008. It was shit, I got made redundant from my new civvy job and it was certainly twitchy bum time for a bit while I sorted my shit out.

But I dug out like ****, sent my CV to literally everyone and applied for hundreds of jobs.

And as luck would have it, I got a bloody good one that springboarded me to senior management and eventual progression to becoming a Chartered Engineer. Not bad considering I left the RN as an AB (LCpl equivalent).

It is possible to thrive in civvy street if you have your head screwed on and work hard. You also need to get your head into the civvy work mindset.

You’ll meet millions of bitter ex squaddies who think all civvies are back stabbing cnuts. This simply isn’t true, they’ve just failed to fit in and are blaming their failings on everyone around them. There are just as many backstabbing cnuts in the forces and in all walks of life, you just need to work out how to deal with them.

I’d say go for it if that’s what your heart is set on. Use your resettlement to your advantage, work hard and seamless transfer to the reserves so you have a quick way back in if everything goes to pot in civvy street.

Fortune favours the brave.
Sorry to disagree with you, the difference to 2008 is, that at this time COVID-19
and high unemployment is making it a lot harder to get a job,
He is better to stay where he is at the moment
 

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