Wanting to leave

Norn_ireland

Swinger
So I want to end my service soon after the covid situation is under control as, I have a baby on the way and want them to live a normal life, and be around them as much as possible, so what I am wondering is what's a good career to get into on civy Street with good pay?
 
Last edited:
So I want to end my service soon after the covid situation is under control as, I have a baby on the way and want them to live a normal life, and be around them as much as possible, so what I am wondering is what's a good carrier to get into on civy Street with good pay?
DPD are a good carrier. I'd avoid Hermes though.

What would you like to send via your postal carrier?

On a more serious note, it depends on your current qualifications and skills, as well as your natural abilities and the area in which you'll live.

There's little chance of you being the first man on Mars if you want to live in Norther Ireland, have no legs and only a BTEC in flower arranging to your name.

What would interest you? What skills do you have?
 

964ST

War Hero
A fence siting politician should be good! With Brexit and children in the loop there is NO better choice IMHO! Loads of perks.
 
DPD are a good carrier. I'd avoid Hermes though.

What would you like to send via your postal carrier?

On a more serious note, it depends on your current qualifications and skills, as well as your natural abilities and the area in which you'll live.

There's little chance of you being the first man on Mars if you want to live in Norther Ireland, have no legs and only a BTEC in flower arranging to your name.

What would interest you? What skills do you have?

This.
 

Daxx

MIA
Book Reviewer
McDonald's are hiring. Minimum wage but all the burgers you can eat.
 
Stay in do a short easy working career get your pension. Civvy st is harder and requires a lot more self discipline and you don't get a pension till you are ready to be boxed up. Unless you have something good set up it will be same shit different day. Do your 22 which in hindsight is NOT a long time.
 
I'd say- if you have a baby on the way, and in these uncertain times, the best way to acheive 'normality' for you and your baby would to stay put until you get a better idea / and the rest of the worlld does-on what the lay of the land will be like a year or so downstream.

You, your mrs and baby will be better off only seeing you at weekends / every few weeks as opposed to seeing you everyday, stressing where the money for the next phonebill / SKY subscription is coming from.
 
Are you pissed?
You have a job that is pretty secure and can provide everything you need for your new family.
Civvy Street is a fecking nightmare, job wise you'll be fecked as a thousand plus people are applying for every bloody job.

Get your head down, work hard.. Safe in the knowledge that you are able to provide a roof over your kids head and are able to put good on the table.

Put it this way, I know a bloke who's 23 with a very young family, he's in the process of joining up purely to be able to provide safety and an income for his Mrs and kid.. Think about it.!
 
I'm in civvy street now, it's f**king hard work with perpetual reviews of performance and, as a highly qualified now civil servant (sorry) I have to apply for my own job back roughly every three years. Scary, and shitty until you get the outcome - had a redundancy notice more than once. I did my bit for for the Queen, but now I'm up against peers who have done this course, done that course, but never come to work to give me a leg-up with the day's duties. Their CV outstrips mine every time.

Stick with what you've got, just for now. See how things are after the little 'un comes along, which ain't cheap.
 

chimera

LE
Moderator
You don't say what employment/trade group you are in, or what rank/pay grade you are currently getting. The advice above is bang on the money. If you haven't noticed the country is in an employment sh*t storm, so sit tight for now, unless you have got some really directly transferable skill (think the very top end of REME, Sappers, Signals trades etc at Class 1)
 
I only left the army as I walked into a decent paying job that my wife lined up for me (nepotism but who cares with bills to pay).

With a young family, unless you have a sure bet getting out I'd stay in. Even bivouacked on a fence line in Kenya with out of date rations to eat it's still a guaranteed wage each month.
 
I would say unless you are some way into your career (and from you original post it sounds not) so have some management skills, quals and track record of achievements to highlight then it could be a tough start in life for you. If you are Corps of some sort then you will have those skills, quals and track record to build on.

Either way though (and this might be even more so for NI) a basic job let alone a career could be a big ask and your early years a challenge and test of your staying power.

As others have said, family needs and staying in are not necessarily at odds with each other. You could also look at developing your career while in which with a few years more service might take you to a better place to be able to read my first paragraph and be able to answer yes to it.

Finally, I appreciate you are (commendably) putting your family needs ahead of yours, but each of us has think of what gives us a sense of purpose in life, that is important for your wellbeing. If you enjoy your current job and the Army then be aware if you leave and don't get the same sense of satisfaction it could affect your sense of self esteem and worth and your family will see that, remember they will want to see you happy and doing well in life too.
 

cowgoesmoo

Old-Salt
Think you really need to give a bit more info before anyone can give any credible advice - if you're a bit thick but like driving then HGV driving could be a "good" career. If you've got a masters degree in Maths then perhaps not
 
You don't say what employment/trade group you are in, or what rank/pay grade you are currently getting. The advice above is bang on the money. If you haven't noticed the country is in an employment sh*t storm, so sit tight for now, unless you have got some really directly transferable skill (think the very top end of REME, Sappers, Signals trades etc at Class 1)
What he said. If you are infantry tanks artillery pioneers, your job prospects are very limited. You have a regular wage, a roof over your head, and a job, stick with it, baby will not notice your absence until it gets to about 18 months to 2 years, i know, ours started to complain that " Daddy doesn't love us anymore, he keeps going away" It was at that point i signed off. BAOR 1980.
 
Last edited:
What @Fiona_TG said.

You are putting your family first. Good on you, bloody well done and I sincerely mean that. Stay in and give your Mrs and nipper the security that they need, in the long run it'll be a massive difference for you and them.
If you get a pad with a young family... Things change, you become more mature and responsible and your CoC will notice that you have become more mature.. Win win.
 
I'd say- if you have a baby on the way, and in these uncertain times, the best way to acheive 'normality' for you and your baby would to stay put until you get a better idea / and the rest of the worlld does-on what the lay of the land will be like a year or so downstream.

You, your mrs and baby will be better off only seeing you at weekends / every few weeks as opposed to seeing you everyday, stressing where the money for the next phonebill / SKY subscription is coming from.
This.
Take a long hard look around you, before making a decision you may regret.
I enjoyed my time in, but had just an amazing and interesting time when I was out, but circumstances were different in the nineties.
 
Also do not fall for what many did during the hagiography of the forces during the Afghanistan years- thinking that anyone will place significant value on being ex-forces. It doesn't work that way.

The truth is-you'll either be seen as a threat on account of having had more life experience than them or- you'll bore the tits off them narrating stories of derring-do.

Civvie workplaces dont work like the forces-where workmates can be relied upon if anything hits the fan.
There are very rarely any "real" friends in a civvy workplace. In so9me sectors there are exceptions. It took me a while to realise that. Its dog eat dog and if you are better than anyone in any way-you WILL be seen as a direct threat...even though they;'ll give you the impression they think the sun shines out of your arse.

Stay put for your, your mrs and your child's sake.
Its too uncertain out here in civvy st at the moment-as many have said-thousands are out of work, and thousands have CVs with all sort of bullshit entries that might actually appeal to 'bosses' who thrive on that sort of stuff.

Quick example: In the refs room one day not too long ago, some bright young thing was holding court about the "Mental" night out he'd had on his rest days. The punchline was something along the lines of "And I was soooooo drunk I missed my mouth with my drink and poured it down my shirt....and I was nearly sick in the taxi home!" That dit drew 100% attention of some people and they found it hillarious.
Mentally I was going to myself "Keep quiet..keep fecking quiet...nah, no point spinning that dit...they wont get it...just go for a shit instead".
 
Last edited:

Latest Threads

Top