Walter Cronkite passes away

#1
Described as "the most trusted man in America" by many, Walter Cronkyte has passed away at the age of 92.

As the man who broke the news of Kennedy's assination and reported some of the most iconic stories of the USA over the last fifty years, doubtful that he will ever be emulated.

"And that's the way it is."
 
#5
he became one of the first reporters accredited to American forces with the outbreak of World War II. He gained fame as a war correspondent, crash-landing a glider in Belgium, accompanying the first Allied troops into North Africa, reporting on the Normandy invasion and covering major battles, including the Battle of the Bulge, in 1944.


That year (1943) Mr. Cronkite was one of eight journalists selected for an Army Air Forces training program that took them on a bombing mission to Germany aboard B-17 Flying Fortresses. Mr. Cronkite manned a machine gun until he was “up to my hips in spent .50-caliber shells,” he wrote in his memoir.
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/18/us/18cronkite.html?pagewanted=2&_r=1&hp

I always prefer Journalists who actually get involved
 
#6
armchair_jihad said:
That year (1943) Mr. Cronkite was one of eight journalists selected for an Army Air Forces training program that took them on a bombing mission to Germany aboard B-17 Flying Fortresses.Mr. Cronkite manned a machine gun until he was “ up to my hips in spent .50-caliber shells,” he wrote in his memoir.
Was he the first 'embedded' journo then?

edited to say: They don't make 'em like this any more - RIP
 
#7
I spent some time in the US in the '60s, and "This is the CBS Evening News, with Walter Cronkite", invariably rounded off with "And that's the way it is", was very much the intelligent choice of viewing, and light-years ahead of the moronic tripe on offer today in that country (and increasingly so in this). An upright member of the old school - and a brave one, too, as noted above - he will be much missed. RIP, old fellow.
 
#8
para_medic said:
armchair_jihad said:
That year (1943) Mr. Cronkite was one of eight journalists selected for an Army Air Forces training program that took them on a bombing mission to Germany aboard B-17 Flying Fortresses.Mr. Cronkite manned a machine gun until he was “ up to my hips in spent .50-caliber shells,” he wrote in his memoir.
Was he the first 'embedded' journo then?
Not exactly, there were several before and during that time, notably Robert Capa and Ernie Pyle
 
#9
What a life lived.
 
#12
Just watch that stuff from 1963; how the hell did he keep his nerve and composure? A true professional and "voice of America".
 
#13
Wonder what he thought of Fox News... or do we know?
 
#14
BoomShackerLacker said:
Wonder what he thought of Fox News... or do we know?
He was a bleeding heart liberal and hated anything of a conservative slant, not sure if he ever called out fox specifically.
 
#15
BoomShackerLacker said:
Wonder what he thought of Fox News... or do we know?
He said "...it (Fox News) was intended to be a conservative organization — beyond that; a far-right-wing organization" and that some of the media giant's practises were unethical and overtly political.
 
#16
Cheers for the responses guys - I posted this sat in the departure gate at Newark, whilst waiting for the flight back to the UK, so posted as the news broke on CNN.

Interesting to watch the predominately American group who had sight of CNN's coverage and the comments being made. Most commenting (really big cross-section, it's not only the shirt wearing professionals, etc.) and there seemed to be a "genuine" sense of loss at a truly respected journalist / anchor.

So, having heard of these overwhelmingly supportive comments, many of which are mirrored in the comments above, it got me wondering how the passing of British News Readers / Journalists would be met and reported.

I am a little biased in being able to count amongst my friends or witinin one degree , a number of what I consider to be "sound and good journalists" whose values of reporting I consider pretty good. Therefore, I won't name anyone, but wonder;

Which British News Readers / Journalists loss, would be met with a similar reaction to the one I witnessed yesterday evening in New Jersey?
 
#17
Chief_Joseph said:
para_medic said:
armchair_jihad said:
That year (1943) Mr. Cronkite was one of eight journalists selected for an Army Air Forces training program that took them on a bombing mission to Germany aboard B-17 Flying Fortresses.Mr. Cronkite manned a machine gun until he was “ up to my hips in spent .50-caliber shells,” he wrote in his memoir.
Was he the first 'embedded' journo then?
Not exactly, there were several before and during that time, notably Robert Capa and Ernie Pyle
Chief you have missed para_medic's pun, he wasn't saying that Cronkite was the first ..

embedded in spent .50 caliber shells...

Pay attention young man!
 
#18
ABrighter2006 said:
Cheers for the responses guys - I posted this sat in the departure gate at Newark, whilst waiting for the flight back to the UK, so posted as the news broke on CNN.

Interesting to watch the predominately American group who had sight of CNN's coverage and the comments being made. Most commenting (really big cross-section, it's not only the shirt wearing professionals, etc.) and there seemed to be a "genuine" sense of loss at a truly respected journalist / anchor.

So, having heard of these overwhelmingly supportive comments, many of which are mirrored in the comments above, it got me wondering how the passing of British News Readers / Journalists would be met and reported.

I am a little biased in being able to count amongst my friends or witinin one degree , a number of what I consider to be "sound and good journalists" whose values of reporting I consider pretty good. Therefore, I won't name anyone, but wonder;

Which British News Readers / Journalists loss, would be met with a similar reaction to the one I witnessed yesterday evening in New Jersey?
Not sure that any current UK journo/correspondent has quite the cultural weight of Cronkite - possibly Richard Dimbleby was the nearest we've ever seen or ever will.

Des
 
#19
Desmond_M said:
ABrighter2006 said:
Cheers for the responses guys - I posted this sat in the departure gate at Newark, whilst waiting for the flight back to the UK, so posted as the news broke on CNN.

Interesting to watch the predominately American group who had sight of CNN's coverage and the comments being made. Most commenting (really big cross-section, it's not only the shirt wearing professionals, etc.) and there seemed to be a "genuine" sense of loss at a truly respected journalist / anchor.

So, having heard of these overwhelmingly supportive comments, many of which are mirrored in the comments above, it got me wondering how the passing of British News Readers / Journalists would be met and reported.

I am a little biased in being able to count amongst my friends or witinin one degree , a number of what I consider to be "sound and good journalists" whose values of reporting I consider pretty good. Therefore, I won't name anyone, but wonder;

Which British News Readers / Journalists loss, would be met with a similar reaction to the one I witnessed yesterday evening in New Jersey?
Not sure that any current UK journo/correspondent has quite the cultural weight of Cronkite - possibly Richard Dimbleby was the nearest we've ever seen or ever will.

Des
Alistair Cooke (famous in the US too) is the most notable example in recent years. Also Jill Dando (though the manner of her death probably contributed to that).

In the future maybe Peter Snow, Martin Bell (managed to catch some 'shrapnel' in Bosnia while talking to camera), Sir David Frost, John Humphrys, Sir Trevor McDonald, Jeremy Paxman.

I remember Walter Cronkite well when I lived in the States in the late '70s. My parents always watched his broadcast inthe evening. A sad loss.
 
#20
barrett said:
BoomShackerLacker said:
Wonder what he thought of Fox News... or do we know?
He said "...it (Fox News) was intended to be a conservative organization — beyond that; a far-right-wing organization" and that some of the media giant's practises were unethical and overtly political.
I'd be worried if he'd thought anything else...
 
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