Walking the Wainwrights

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
My sprogs are now at an age where they’re showing a serious interest in hitting the fells and exploring where we live. A month or two back we climbed the Quiraing on the Isle of Skye which gave me the confidence that they’re ready to start fell bashing.

So I duly bought a map of the Wainwrights with the aim of checking them off. There are 214 of them so I imagine this is gonna take us a few years. the boy is 10 and the small lady is 9 so I reckon we can get these cracked before they finish school.

 
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WhiskeyTango

Old-Salt
That's awesome. I recently joined my mother for a few days whilst she was doing the coast to coast (wildcamping at 70 years old - mental). Took my 15 year old brother along for the craic and he had an awesome time.

My experience is that kids will love it even more if campsites, bonfires with shandy and plenty of food are involved.
 

arfah

ADC
There were adult supervised kids of similar age passing by me on the way up Ben Nevis earlier this month.
I saw them again as they were speeding back down.
I was still on my way up…

I’d bet your own children will be just as spright. Good luck!
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
First up is our closest decent fell and my favourite walk in the whole lakes, High Street via Riggindale. I reckon I’ve done this climb about 20 or 30 times and have wild camped on this route a few times.

It’s quite a challenging one to start the kids off on, but my thinking is that if they can do this, they can do anything. We also get two Wainwright’s for the price of one on this walk.

High Street and Mardale Il Bell.

There are a few reasons why I really like this route:

1. It’s only about 25 mins from our house.
2. Free parking pretty much exactly at the start / finish point unlike a lot of other climbs where the first 2 miles are just walking along a road.
3. Spectacular scenery.
4. Very easy to navigate (in good visibility) because you can see your start / finish point for pretty much the entire climb and paths are well trodden.

As mentioned above, I’ve done this route many times and the best way in my opinion is anti clockwise, going up Riggindale and down past Small Water, hardest bit first then a nice steady climb down. I’ve done it the other way a couple of times and found coming down Riggindale both dangerous and knackering.

The first mile or so is just following the path round Hawsewater reservoir, until you reach some woods. Jink left and start climbing up Riggindale. The first half hour is an absolute bastard, zig zagging up a near vertical path, but it steadies out a few times and the view in all directions is spectacular.

At 3 points on Riggindale there is a bit of scrambling to do, climbing over large rocks.

The top is in view for nearly the whole ascent so it’s easy to judge your progress. Likewise you can see the car park (starting point) for most of it so you can see how far you’ve come. Certainly a handy morale booster for the sprogs as they started to get tired.

Riggindale took us about 2 hours, stopping a few times for snacks and rests. At the top you reach a cairn and a trig point. On a clear day you can see right across the Solway and the Pennines behind you.

Then it‘s a fairly flat descent to Mardale Il Bell before you reach the remains of a bothy. A good stopping point for lunch.

Finally it’s a rocky path back down to the car park, past Small Water and some waterfalls.

212 to go.

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My sprogs are now at an age where they’re showing a serious interest in hitting the fells and exploring where we live. A month or two back we climbed the Quiraing on the Isle of Skye which gave me the confidence that they’re ready to start fell bashing.

So I duly bought a map of the Wainwrights with the aim of checking them off. There are 214 of them so I imagine this is gonna take us a few years. the boy is 10 and the small lady is 9 so I reckon we can get these cracked before they finish school.

Call me a glass half empty sort of chap, but I think you'll be finished later than half past three.
 
And on a serious note, an excellent project and at that age when achieved, will be something they will genuinely look back on for the rest of their lives with great pride.
 
First up is our closest decent fell and my favourite walk in the whole lakes, High Street via Riggindale. I reckon I’ve done this climb about 20 or 30 times and have wild camped on this route a few times.

It’s quite a challenging one to start the kids off on, but my thinking is that if they can do this, they can do anything. We also get two Wainwright’s for the price of one on this walk.

High Street and Mardale Il Bell.

There are a few reasons why I really like this route:

1. It’s only about 25 mins from our house.
2. Free parking pretty much exactly at the start / finish point unlike a lot of other climbs where the first 2 miles are just walking along a road.
3. Spectacular scenery.
4. Very easy to navigate (in good visibility) because you can see your start / finish point for pretty much the entire climb and paths are well trodden.

As mentioned above, I’ve done this route many times and the best way in my opinion is anti clockwise, going up Riggindale and down past Small Water, hardest bit first then a nice steady climb down. I’ve done it the other way a couple of times and found coming down Riggindale both dangerous and knackering.

The first mile or so is just following the path round Hawsewater reservoir, until you reach some woods. Jink left and start climbing up Riggindale. The first half hour is an absolute bastard, zig zagging up a near vertical path, but it steadies out a few times and the view in all directions is spectacular.

At 3 points on Riggindale there is a bit of scrambling to do, climbing over large rocks.

The top is in view for nearly the whole ascent so it’s easy to judge your progress. Likewise you can see the car park (starting point) for most of it so you can see how far you’ve come. Certainly a handy morale booster for the sprogs as they started to get tired.

Riggindale took us about 2 hours, stopping a few times for snacks and rests. At the top you reach a cairn and a trig point. On a clear day you can see right across the Solway and the Pennines behind you.

Then it‘s a fairly flat descent to Mardale Il Bell before you reach the remains of a bothy. A good stopping point for lunch.

Finally it’s a rocky path back down to the car park, past Small Water and some waterfalls.

212 to go.

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No bergan the size of a house? They’ll never learn if you are soft on them.
 
And on a serious note, an excellent project and at that age when achieved, will be something they will genuinely look back on for the rest of their lives with great pride.

Also provides excellent material for school projects.

Teacher: “what did you do during the school holidays“

Chav Kid: “played my xbox miss”

Ravers nipper “Bagged 213 wainwrights, this weekend I’m doing some rope with my dad, then planning on bagging some munros”.
 
Great getting them started so young Raves, it'll stand them in good stead in later life.
I'm going against the 'norm' here, but it was someone else who got me thinking along these lines. I only wear boots when I'm in The Cairngorms in winter, and need crampons. I've said in another thread regarding ankle support, and how that support can actually cause problems. Over the millennia, the ankle flexed as we walked over the terrain with bare feet. I walk up Munros with running shoes, albeit not running! They're a lot lighter than boots, and if you do go over on your ankle, which you will, the foot can recover control quicker as there's less weight on it resulting in less chance of damage to the ankle. Just a thought, for you and any others who've had ankle problems whilst walking. I have, when I wore boots, none since using 'running' shoes.
 

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