Voter ID pilot Schemes

#21
I have no particular problem with requiring ID at pollimg stations; however it does seem to me that postal voting is the one that’s vulnerable to fraud.
 
#22
Simple if you are a British Citizen and entitled to vote in a British Election be it Local/Genral,what is wrong with having a British Citizenship ID card?
Time we all had ID cards to cover all entitlements like Driving,Passport,NHS,HMRC,DWP,Local Council services Education etc.
The only objections will come from those not entitled or Corbyniski and his true leadership McClusky and Momentum.
If ALL British Citizens are issued with an ID card (FOC) the likes of Windrush,Grenfell could be avoided ( notice I said Could as nothing is guaranteed)
But, we know from experience that the government would outsource the production and issue of ID cards to the lowest bidder, with minimal oversight.
We know from experience that those producers and issuers can be corrupted, and would issue far more cards than the current population requires.
We know from experience that government departments sell our data to all and sundry.
We know from experience that government departments frequently lose or destroy documents and records that some people rely on to prove their very existence.
We know from experience that anything the government thinks is " a good idea" inevitably goes to ratshit within weeks.
 
#23
We have had to show photo ID to vote in Northern Ireland for years. I have never heard any of the ethnic minorities here say that it has caused them a problem.

The only people that consistently bitch about it are Sinn Fein, whose widespread electoral fraud is what caused the law in the first place. Oddly enough their arguments against it are exactly the same as above, that Catholics are less likely to have photo ID, for some mysterious reason that they can't actually explain.
Presumably hardly any NI catholics drive or travel abroad, then. Given the number of dusky faces you can see behind the wheel on the mainland, and the duration for which we've had photocard licenses, it would be decidedly easy for the majority of minorities to flash a conveniently wallet-sized official government document with their photo and particulars on it...?

Mefinks Labour doth protest too much, the vote-rigging shithouses.
 
#25
Not convinced, you underestimate the actual effect of policies like this. How they are meant to work is one thing, how they actually work in practice is usually quite different.

1. By default, any initiative which seeks to tighten ID requirements is going to cut some people out - otherwise what is the point. The question is how many, and whether it will be the right people.
I'd suggest the biggest impact will be on the old. Mum, aged 88, has never had a passport and has thankfully given up her driving licence. As her short term memory is not good I regularly have to search the house to find and file the relevant council tax, utility bills so I can lay my hands on them when she needs them. Given that she loses her Credit Card about twice a year issuing her an ID card would be pointless.
 
#28
But, we know from experience that the government would outsource the production and issue of ID cards to the lowest bidder, with minimal oversight.
We know from experience that those producers and issuers can be corrupted, and would issue far more cards than the current population requires.
We know from experience that government departments sell our data to all and sundry.
We know from experience that government departments frequently lose or destroy documents and records that some people rely on to prove their very existence.
We know from experience that anything the government thinks is " a good idea" inevitably goes to ratshit within weeks.
civil servant Walt
 
#29
From the OP link;
"(2F) A specified document is— (a) in the case of an elector who has an anonymous entry, the elector’s poll card;"

Not sure what an anonymous entry is, but he/she only requires the pol card as id. Seems to defeat the object of the exercise?
 
#30
I'd suggest the biggest impact will be on the old. Mum, aged 88, has never had a passport and has thankfully given up her driving licence. As her short term memory is not good I regularly have to search the house to find and file the relevant council tax, utility bills so I can lay my hands on them when she needs them. Given that she loses her Credit Card about twice a year issuing her an ID card would be pointless.
If only there were some way of placing the vote in a suitable container and having it delivered to the returning officer by way of a national provider of such services, thereby precluding the requirement to identify oneself in person.
 
#31
I'd suggest the biggest impact will be on the old. Mum, aged 88, has never had a passport and has thankfully given up her driving licence. As her short term memory is not good I regularly have to search the house to find and file the relevant council tax, utility bills so I can lay my hands on them when she needs them. Given that she loses her Credit Card about twice a year issuing her an ID card would be pointless.

I think that one point is that, unlike in the past, any ID card system should have an easy online reference that can be checked. Most passports and official certificates that i hold have e-versions that are used by the authorities (I assume that, for example, UKBA can flash up a scan of your current passport when you show your paper version). Your forgetful oldie will thus be visually recognised when a transaction is required, so retention of the card itself may not be vital.

In the case of polling, it shouldn't be a major challenge (self-inflicted data laws apart) for a voting ward to be issued on a device the set of e-IDs that match its voter list. Currently they receive a written list of registered voters that someone has had to extract and print off. It'd probably be even quicker to download an electronic file for use.
 
#32
Presumably during those 10 years they won't need to pay any taxes? Not taxation without representation. Caused quite a big kerfuffle a while ago.
But they do have representation - wherever they live will have an MP.

"no taxes without representation" was about not having a representative in parliament.
 
#33
Everything you do is recorded anyway and I mean everything, so they might at well issue ID cards,
IE, I was away from home dog sitting and the people we sit for ring every day so a mobile phone
is needed, Mrs forgot the changer so bought another phone [cheaper than a charger],
Three years later I am on a government website and they asked me a series of questions
one of which was "In the last 5 years have you bought a mobile phone"
 
#34
Is this a problem that needs solving? In America, to listen to the noise, this had become a huge issue even before Trump. However, there is vanishingly little evidence that it is actually a problem: the number of proven voter fraud cases is extraordinarily small
The issue is more fraught in the USA because some parts of the country have a prior history of using ID specifications,property tax qualifiers, literacy or other qualifying tests, Poll taxes and other dodges to prevent the non-reflective members of the population registering to vote... Indeed they even had to amend the national constitution (24th Amendment) to stop tax payments being used to disbar voters..
 
#35
When you have a situation like Tower Hamlets you know there is a problem, that police are needed at every polling station with cameras, extra training and instructions to ensure only English is spoken around the polling stations I am not sure why any one would complain about showing some form of ID.

Police investigate new fraud claims over Tower Hamlets poll

Police get anti-fraud election training

Police 'failed' in election fraud probe

Either this or we descend in to third world politics in certain areas of the country.
 
#36
Rrrrrriiiiiiggght.

So you're looking to sell your case to the Borders Agency (or whatever they're called this week) as an upstanding person who the UK really needs. And first thing you do is not pay taxes?

Anyone else see a snag with this?
Anyone who is paying taxes is entitled to a say in how those taxes are spent. In this country we do that by allowing them to choose who represents them in local and general elections. No taxation without representation.
 
#37
When you have a situation like Tower Hamlets you know there is a problem, that police are needed at every polling station with cameras, extra training and instructions to ensure only English is spoken around the polling stations I am not sure why any one would complain about showing some form of ID.

Police investigate new fraud claims over Tower Hamlets poll

Either this or we have descended into third world politics in certain areas of the country.
Minor edit needed there.
 
#40
How it works...
I have a green barcoded ID book.
This is NOT mine.

On voting day, I head to the polls, show the book, they stamp it with the date.
They check my listing on the (paper) voter's roll, and tick it off.
I have to put my thumb under a scanner, which picks up fluorescent traces.
Then they mark my thumbnail with special pen.
I get my ballot papers, and head to the booth to do the X thing.

On the ID thing, it is compulsory to carry your drivers license at all times when driving.

Credit Card size.

Now, I like being able to prove who I am if asked.
Human Rights types bleat and moan, saying "I ain't done nuffing wrong!"
I'm the opposite - "Here you go, officer/bank clerk/airline check-in staff etc... this proves it is me. I have nothing to hide."
 

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