Voter ID pilot Schemes

Are the points required set by the government or by the banks?
They are required by the Government. As far as I know, the banks have nothing to do with it, the scheme came in during the 1980s as a response to various crooked business scams involving inter alia the setting up of bank accounts under false names.
 
General Postal Voters

The basics of postal voting in Australia. Note that each State has a slightly different form to fill out for registration, but essentially they are all the same. You must have a valid reason for requesting a postal vote, and the reasons are listed on the first page of the site. You can fill these forms out online, but they must then be printed, signed, and posted to the relevant authority. I think that has to do with problems with electronic signatures.

Electronic voting has been tried in Australia as the site also shows, but, although there is a system of telephone voting for blind and visually handicapped voters which evolved from those trials, electronic voting in general is not allowed because the present legislation requires paper ballots. If the law were to change, electronic voting might be allowed.
 
Presumably during those 10 years they won't need to pay any taxes? Not taxation without representation. Caused quite a big kerfuffle a while ago.
Green card holders can't vote in federal elections in the US, so presumably those who caused said kerfuffle were OK with this.
 
Elections must have been ever so much fun in the 18th Century, if one is to believe William Hogarth:



The Whig candidate for Guzzledown, Hogarth's fictional electorate, hosts a drunken tavern party while his Tory opponent incites a riot outside. As usual Hogarth has filled his work with satirical allegories. The painting itself, for example, is a parody of several, "Last Supper" paintings.

Even politicians must leave off their drunken revelry to attend to work from time to time:



In this case, taking bribes from both sides. Note the veterans who are being ignored at the left and right of the painting and the crowd rioting in the background. Does anything ever change all that much?

Election Day at last:



The halt, the lame and the blind are miraculously restored just long enough for them to cast a vote, although there is some dispute over the old sweat in the right foreground using his left hook rather than his lost hand to swear on the Bible. Shock, horror! That can't be legal, surely?

That's Britannia in the left background in a broken down carriage. Her coachmen don't care about that; they are more interested in their hand of cards, even if the one on the left is blatantly cheating.

The series ends in another riot as the winning Tory candidate is chaired through the town. This time it's the Whigs who have organized the mob:



We see that "Nunchucks," were not unknown in the 18th Century, which perhaps isn't surprising, the name translates as "Flail." Even if the brawl hadn't started, the party were headed for disaster anyway as the blind fiddler leads them into a ditch. The frightened pigs refer to the parable of the Gadarene Swine, and you can make what you will of the goose flying overhead and the chimney sweep pissing on the lot of 'em.

Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose!
 

Sarastro

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Hopefully never going to happen. Neither the government nor the big name IT consultancies have the skills or ability to deliver a workable secure voting system.
Well, that's probably because you don't hire consultancies or governments to build software.

The technology to build a workable secure voting system is there, and has been for about ten years: if you have ever bought anything online or used online banking then you've used a system with an extremely low failure rate which could easily be repurposed for voting. What's more, the vast majority of the failures / fraud in online transactions are from overuse or user error (or unwise use), which means the unique ID details for a given individual get spread more widely than they should. Given the infrequency of voting, that source of error would be pretty much eliminated for a voting system.

I agree with what you mean about the UK government's chronic habit of ******* up major IT projects by tendering them to fourth rate corporate consortia, but there are several places around the world (Estonia, Finland, mostly Nordic countries...all of whom are well aware of the threat from their big neighbour to the east) that already use it, and it works perfectly well.
 
Well, that's probably because you don't hire consultancies or governments to build software.

The technology to build a workable secure voting system is there, and has been for about ten years: if you have ever bought anything online or used online banking then you've used a system with an extremely low failure rate which could easily be repurposed for voting. What's more, the vast majority of the failures / fraud in online transactions are from overuse or user error (or unwise use), which means the unique ID details for a given individual get spread more widely than they should. Given the infrequency of voting, that source of error would be pretty much eliminated for a voting system.

I agree with what you mean about the UK government's chronic habit of ******* up major IT projects by tendering them to fourth rate corporate consortia, but there are several places around the world (Estonia, Finland, mostly Nordic countries...all of whom are well aware of the threat from their big neighbour to the east) that already use it, and it works perfectly well.
I don't disagree. I could knock up a secure demonstration in about an afternoon.

There is still an elegant simplicity in our paper based method though, and it is visibly traceable and trusted - and then there is the history of who can count the votes quickest to return a result first.

It's a working system that doesn't need to change.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator

skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
We have had to show photo ID to vote in Northern Ireland for years. I have never heard any of the ethnic minorities here say that it has caused them a problem.

The only people that consistently bitch about it are Sinn Fein, whose widespread electoral fraud is what caused the law in the first place. Oddly enough their arguments against it are exactly the same as above, that Catholics are less likely to have photo ID, for some mysterious reason that they can't actually explain.

That’s why so few Catholics drive vehicles, travel, live over 60(bus passes) work in government departments or any employment which issues an ID card.
So all those shit drivers out there are Prods or unlicensed catholics.
The police should be doing something. I’m incensed
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
oh yea my polling card has my photo & Signature on it NOT
You receive it from your local authority, which has your address, birth date and signature on your application to join the electoral roll.
 
What's wrong with those things, exactly? Clearly it would be unreasonable in an emergency, but if I have to take my drivers licence to the GP next time I get ill I really couldn't give the tiniest rat's arse about it.

So there are, for example, no politicians recently forced to leave office due to electoral fraud?
Of course not. And there isn't a massive thread on here about it, either. No sirree-bob!
And as if on cue...

A disgraced ex-Labour councillor convicted of voter fraud is re-standing after changing his name
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
Apparently, it's not illegal and I can see a certain party making the most of this, namely the one advertising this on the board.
31326844_10156474117926654_851956713631252480_n.jpg
 
Apparently, it's not illegal
Apparently it is. Except for local elections where you would be voting in two different council areas...

If I’m registered twice, can I vote twice?
If you are registered to vote in two different electoral areas, you can vote in local elections for the two different local councils.

However, it is an offence to vote twice in the same type of election, such as in a UK general election. Doing this could result in a fine of up to £5,000.

Electoral Commission | I have two homes. Can I register to vote at both addresses?
 
Just got my new driving license, not happy' as years ago Ii paid the fiver for never having to pay again.
Now have too shell out the best part of a hundred quid for a new passport.
 
I have a green barcoded ID book.
This is NOT mine.
To any of us with a government issued identity card, or a warrant, or a photo driving license, or a biometric passport, this requires no radical change in mental attitude. It certainly doesn't impinge on our civil liberties.
The Government still likes the idea of identity cards and in my opinion this merely approaches the problem from a different direction. It is certainly more subtle than the "Poll Tax".
 

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