Voter ID pilot Schemes

an air hostess at Gatwick. She had been a ballet dancer until her breasts got too big
That's not a girlfriend. That's a pitch for a porn film.

National ID cards are a very useful tool if they are implemented correctly. There are some very interesting articles on line about the Estonian card. Plug it in to a PC and you can use it for on line voting. It can also be used as a passport and to pay for public transport. Everybody who gets a card also gets an official email address. Saved a fortune in sending letters from the government.

I think there's little chance of ID cards being introduced in Britain. Think of the arguments about how many genders there are. Plus, the last Labour government tried to use ID cards to track our every movement, including trips to the toilet, how many sheets of bog roll used and was it a long or a short flush.
 
That's not a girlfriend. That's a pitch for a porn film.

National ID cards are a very useful tool if they are implemented correctly. There are some very interesting articles on line about the Estonian card. Plug it in to a PC and you can use it for on line voting. It can also be used as a passport and to pay for public transport. Everybody who gets a card also gets an official email address. Saved a fortune in sending letters from the government.

I think there's little chance of ID cards being introduced in Britain. Think of the arguments about how many genders there are. Plus, the last Labour government tried to use ID cards to track our every movement, including trips to the toilet, how many sheets of bog roll used and was it a long or a short flush.
Contrasts. The Estonian model shows how it could work, and Work very well. The Labour model was an exercise in population control. It’s interesting how far they were prepared to go when it suited them, and how anti they are now it doesn’t.
 
Bingo, house called.................if a person hasn't served they do not get it. spot on chap.
Ah, the Robert Heinlein solution (see Starship Troopers, the book not the movie)
 
So is the Guardian saying Voter ID is racist because voter fraud is more prevalent in one ethnic group?
 
If we do go ahead, and outsource this, I suggest we award the contract to Alphabet (Google). If they don't have a record of you already, they'll probably pay us for the chance to add you to their database.
 

greyfergie

MIA
Book Reviewer
Yes, that cancels the referendum result. Actually you did commit an electoral offence by impersonating a voter, but I wonder why you bothered, because production of polling card (while a requirement in some of the imminent ID trials) was not required in order to vote.
Odd ours did? Maybe just to stop revolving door voting? Definitely produced though, because I got turned away am as I couldn’t find mine....

Maybe it was a registration card rather than a polling card comes to think of it....
 
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I have no objection to id cards in principle.
My main concern is the lanyard.
Seems to me, nowadays, everyone and his brother has a colourful lanyard with some form of id attached.
Would I be required to wear a lanyard representing my political persuasion?
Questions, questions.
 
The signature word in your first sentence is "probably". Try reading again your second sentence "...council drones will not deviate from strict laid down guidance..." Of course staff won't, because it's basic that electoral rules should be (a) clearly publicised so voters know what's required and (b) then applied by the book, not made up by council "morons" and "drones" as they go along, otherwise you will find firearms certificates accepted at one polling station and refused at the next. Hope that makes it clearer.
Still in pedant mode, the people checking id at polling centres are volunteers, not necessarily council workers, drones or otherwise.
 
Nobody has to carry an ID card at all times.

I have an MOD90 and a warrant card and I only carry them when I need to.

The point is, making people produce ID to vote at a polling station to prevent voter fraud, where there is little or no voter fraud is nonsense, and would seem to be designed by people looking to deny a vote to other people who would vote for the other lot.

End postal voting. 99%+ problem solved.
Go for both, I say.
 
Indeed. Licences is the word for the plural.

Much like Billy practises football, between the two dental practices.

May be going a little off topic here though.
I'd advise you to take advice about that.:cool:;)
 
In Germany I had a residents permit. Didn't entitle me to much though as I had to prove I could support myself and had medical insurance before I got it.
Offspring is applying for one for New Zealand. We should copy their immigration system!
 
As ever, ID cards, like other things such as stop and search, need a proper debate which isn't allowed to get hijacked by the shrill single-issuists. I mention stop and search because all of my Afro-Caribbean friends are in favour, yet if you listen to 'community representatives', no-one is. Everyone I speak to has no issue with an ID card in principle.

I don't see that debate happening, though.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
To which the only logical conclusion is to end postal voting.

The political answer from the government in power is of course disenfranchise those who might vote for the other lot.

I don't have a photocard driving licence or a current passport. I probably won't vote, because an MOD90, a warrant card or a firearm certificate won't be recognised by the morons at the polling station.

Anyway, it doesn't matter. Democracy is finished in the UK and we are slowly transitioning into a proto fascist corporate state.
We all postal vote in this house, 4 adults and once you have jumped through the fairly low set hoops its a convenience that ensures at least that 4 votes are cast in this house. The signatures are updated and checked against the council register every year, I could I suppose if I really wanted to double the number of voters but as we aren't crooks and don't normally have 8 adults at one address as a norm I would expect to be caught out!
I'm for keeping postal voting, its the rules that need enforcing, typical knee jerk reaction to a problem is to ban instead of enforcing!
 
OK, let's go one step further and make voting compulsory for qualified citizens. This really would need tight administration, and some kind of verification if it's an offence not to vote. Perhaps unique ID's would do it. Whilst every voter could be defrauded on the day, just like every credit card can, given enough time one could work out exactly who and how, and some spectacular sentences for offenders would reduce the incidence of it over, say, four general elections. Those who aren't in favour of parliamentary democracy are welcome just to wilfully spoil their papers as at present, or we can add an extra box for them to tick.

(Or, for the disenfranchised illiterates, revert to the old South African system of being given three coloured pingpong balls on entering the booth, and depositing the colour of your candidate into the sealed box. On departure, hand your un-used balls to the men from the Bureau of State Security to prove you have voted)
I live in Australia as it happens and this is what obtains at the moment:


Under the existing Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 it is compulsory for Australian citizens aged 18 years or older, and who have lived at the same address for a month, to register their name and address on the electoral roll. Enrolment can be made online or by completing a form available from the Australian Electoral Commission.[17]

To enrol, citizens need to provide evidence of identity: a driver's licence, Australian passport number or have someone who is already on the roll to confirm the enrolee’s identity.[18]

While it is commonly understood that voting is compulsory for Australian citizens, in practice you are required only to present yourself at a voting booth and have your name marked off the roll. Because casting a ballot is done in secret, it is impossible to tell in a particular case whether a valid vote has actually been cast. A voter may have deposited a blank ballot paper in the box, for example.

On polling day, AEC officials ask each prospective voter the following questions:

  • What is your full name?
  • Where do you live?
  • Have you voted before in this election?

If a voter’s name does not appear on the official ‘certified’ list, a voter can still cast a ballot in the form of a ‘declaration’ vote, and its eligibility is determined later, once relevant checks have been carried out:

You are issued a declaration vote if your name and/or address details cannot be found on the certified list used at the polling place at which you have come to vote, or if your name has already been marked as having voted. The envelope used to seal your ballot papers is called a declaration vote envelope. Your declaration vote ballot papers are inserted into the envelope and forwarded to the division in which you are claiming enrolment. The envelope has a counterfoil which is removed and filed in a 'declaration records' folder. This is a record that you voted at that particular polling place. You 'declare' that you are entitled to vote by signing the envelope.[19]

Thus, under present legislation, a person is not required to show ID in order to cast a ballot at a Federal election.

Nor, I might add, in any State or local government election where voting is also compulsory.

From: Voter ID – Parliament of Australia
 

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