Builds Vosper 73Ft Motor torpedo boats

I see that the 1st SGB Flotilla was commanded by Sir Peter Scott, the son of Scott of the Antarctic and founder of the Slimbridge Wildfowl Trust in Gloucestershire.
Still impressive the amount of weapons, that those Dog boats carried at the end of the war.
Two powered 6pounder Molems. A 20mm Oerlikon and two powered twin mounts Vickers. 50 cal, either side of the Bridge. And that's not counting what the Skipper decided his boat needed.
 

The description says:

1549376414657.png

More info on the film at the youtube page.

ETA, have just noticed the film is referenced and linked to at the aforementioned spitfires of the sea. Their commentary on the film is interesting and informative. The Broad Fourteens

I notice that the IWM host a copy of the film and have a frames tab, allowing you to browse various frames that open at that point in the film for ease of reference. THE BROAD FOURTEENS [Main Title]

A higher quality version is available in four sections. This is much better for reference work.
THE BROAD FOURTEENS [Main Title]
 
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I see that the 1st SGB Flotilla was commanded by Sir Peter Scott, the son of Scott of the Antarctic and founder of the Slimbridge Wildfowl Trust in Gloucestershire.
Slightly off-topic, but...

Over thirty years ago, when I was a wee university midshipman, I read an excellent memoir of coastal forces by a chap who was at one point Peter Scott's 2ic. Can I, got the life of me, remember his name or the book's title? As I say, it was a personal memoir, rather than a history per se.

One bit that sticks in my mind was the author's comments on the two young officers assigned as the navigators on the flotilla leader's and deputy flotilla leader's boats. The flotilla leader had a Sub Lieutenant, who stayed at his chart table, maintaining the plot, in the worst of fire-fights, even as rounds passed through the wheelhouse. Utter admiration from the writer.

The author, as deputy leader, had a 19 year old midshipman as his navigator; the comment was that this young man had as much "fighting spirit" as the rest of the crew put together, but the result was, much to his CO's distress on occasions, that when they ran into the Germans, he would just scribble down one hasty last fix, then join in the fight with one of the old US .30 Lewis guns that had been crudely modified as a "hand-held" weapon in 1940. At the end of the engagement he would draw a big circle around his last fix - radius of X minutes fire-fight at 35 knots - and proudly tell the CO, "We are somewhere in there, sir!"

Oh, and when he had his mount shot from under him - the crew were all picked up by a sister ship - the author got a bollocking from the flotilla leader for excessive honesty about the kit that they managed to salvage as they abandoned the boat, since they could/should have indented for 100% replacements. Particularly pre-war Zeiss binoculars.

Anyway, grateful if anyone has any clues as to the book / author!
 
was at Boathouse four today run by Portsmouth Dockyard Historic Property trust, to meet the Volunteer coordinator. They are building a MTB from WW1, here it is being built. The cross stringers are steamed and bent into position before being fixed in place. She would launch off the Stern and get out of the way of the torpedo as it was travelling forward in the same direction as the boat! Hairy.
 
the lower portion of the kit torpedo mounts cut off and will be used to mount the new Tubes, the tube on the right of the picture is still to be cut away, the mount to the left of that has been partly cleaned up, the rest still to go.
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Slightly off-topic, but...

Over thirty years ago, when I was a wee university midshipman, I read an excellent memoir of coastal forces by a chap who was at one point Peter Scott's 2ic. Can I, got the life of me, remember his name or the book's title? As I say, it was a personal memoir, rather than a history per se.

One bit that sticks in my mind was the author's comments on the two young officers assigned as the navigators on the flotilla leader's and deputy flotilla leader's boats. The flotilla leader had a Sub Lieutenant, who stayed at his chart table, maintaining the plot, in the worst of fire-fights, even as rounds passed through the wheelhouse. Utter admiration from the writer.

The author, as deputy leader, had a 19 year old midshipman as his navigator; the comment was that this young man had as much "fighting spirit" as the rest of the crew put together, but the result was, much to his CO's distress on occasions, that when they ran into the Germans, he would just scribble down one hasty last fix, then join in the fight with one of the old US .30 Lewis guns that had been crudely modified as a "hand-held" weapon in 1940. At the end of the engagement he would draw a big circle around his last fix - radius of X minutes fire-fight at 35 knots - and proudly tell the CO, "We are somewhere in there, sir!"

Oh, and when he had his mount shot from under him - the crew were all picked up by a sister ship - the author got a bollocking from the flotilla leader for excessive honesty about the kit that they managed to salvage as they abandoned the boat, since they could/should have indented for 100% replacements. Particularly pre-war Zeiss binoculars.

Anyway, grateful if anyone has any clues as to the book / author!
Peter's "The Battle of the Narrow Seas" and Len Reynold's Dogboats at War are the Standard Reference Books on this subject

Of the Top of my Head other memoirs

Peter Dickins "Night Action"
Robert Hitchen "We Fought them in Gunboats"/"Gunboat Command"
Horlock's "Our Lady of the Pirates" which is an absolute ****** to get hold of, so if anyone finds a copy....
Len Reynold's MGB 658
AJ Chapman "War of the Motor Gun boats"
 
Peter's "The Battle of the Narrow Seas" and Len Reynold's Dogboats at War are the Standard Reference Books on this subject

Of the Top of my Head other memoirs

Peter Dickins "Night Action"
Robert Hitchen "We Fought them in Gunboats"/"Gunboat Command"
Horlock's "Our Lady of the Pirates" which is an absolute ****** to get hold of, so if anyone finds a copy....
Len Reynold's MGB 658
AJ Chapman "War of the Motor Gun boats"
Thank you - definitely not Peter Scott's own book, but just possibly Reynold or Dickins...
 
was at Boathouse four today run by Portsmouth Dockyard Historic Property trust, to meet the Volunteer coordinator. They are building a MTB from WW1, here it is being built. The cross stringers are steamed and bent into position before being fixed in place. She would launch off the Stern and get out of the way of the torpedo as it was travelling forward in the same direction as the boat! Hairy.
This year is of course the centenary of Agar's VC for attacking the Bolshevik fleet in Kronstadt with just such a CMB. (Preserved in a hangar at Duxford.)
 
the complete unit trial fitted to the kit base portion, now removed from the kit Torpedo tubes, happy with that, time to paint and then mask up for top dark grey cam.
 
the kit deck vents have these very visible location studs, once they have been ground out, it much improves the appearance of the assembled item.
 
white primer on the Bridge/helm principle components, and the vents await some mr surface on their internal joints.
 

daz

LE
the complete unit trial fitted to the kit base portion, now removed from the kit Torpedo tubes, happy with that, time to paint and then mask up for top dark grey cam.
I'd of thought that the rails would of come in resin or etched strips along with the tubes ... all looking good saying that
 

daz

LE
cheers daz, the kit parts are a bit gappy, Mr Surface to the rescue.
A bit gappy?? that's a quality understatement if ever there was one :)
 

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