Vorsrpung Durch Dickhe@d

I'm pretty sure my lowly Skoda packages the telemetrics and camera feeds if you stack in so plod can do forensics.

That Audi driver seems to be intent on being introduced to the Grim Reaper by The EM, but my concern is he'll end up stacking into another car containing an innocent party.

Hopefully he'll be removed from society before he has the chance to do so.
I know that road very well - at Pease Pottage it seamlessly becomes the A23 but is motorway standard until just outside Brighton. A few years ago, another toerag was doing a similar sort of thing going from Crawley to Brighton with 5 people in the car going at well over 100mph and bragging to someone about it on his mobile phone. Just before Pyecombe, the road does an 'S' which he misjudged and the car somersaulted over the barrier into the London bound side, killing himself, everyone else in the car and 3 people in cars going the other way, including a 3 year old lad whose parents had brought him down to Brighton for the day. Brave lad hung on in ICU for 3 days before succumbing and I think about it every time I drive past that spot and it still upsets me as it was nothing to do with the little feller. As a consequence, the A23/M23 is liberally sprinkled with ANPR and has a number of unmarked police cars regularly patrolling. I think that laddo will be getting a visit before long.
 
I suspect its not his car ?

probably dealer, technician or valeter ?
 

philc

LE
He'd probably still have explain why his phone was doing over 200mph.
What the phone he left in his car.


See I watch Police camera Action Northern Bastards and they have every excuse in the book lined up.

Coke found in the pockets, these are my brothers jeans, coat or jacket.

Boot full of nicked gear, just brought the car officer.

Going equipped at 2 in the morning, off to buy a lorry, mates broken down or I am horticulturalist.
 
Plenty of CCTV along motorways for a variety of uses, it won't be that hard to find the car and possibly a half decent image of the driver.
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
I suspect its not his car ?

probably dealer, technician or valeter ?
Nah.
If it was a sales knob-jockey, he's be too busy taking video of himself to get the speedo in the frame.
The valeter would be in the R8 behind, flashing his lights to get past....
The tech would be in the R8 passenger seat seeing how low the mpg would go.
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
It seems the Purple Cloaked one sells Audis
another Yoot will be getting a knock at the door soon


 

Anonymous Yank

On ROPS
On ROPs
Last time I was getting my Ferrari serviced they had a completely totalled 488 in there.

From the car’s ECU they were able to tell that the car had been doing over 160 just before it crashed.

I assume most modern cars have some sort of device like this now? Not sure if it would stand as evidence in a court of law, or even if the police would have the right to access that data.
They do, it does, and they do.
 
Stupid. I'm sure Darwin will catch up with the driver. Even the Polis don't drive that fast.
They do when they're running away from Pikies!
 
An Audi driver filmed themselves doing up to 200 mph on the M23 in Crawley, West Sussex. Even less impressive it looks like he was holding his phone at the time.

Apparently an RS of some variety.

A whiff of sulphur coming from the exhaust pipe perhaps?



(ETA changed link to YouTube).

when caught, guaranteed jail time
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
Most modern cars of any price have some sort of telematics that can be accessed, at least, by the manufacturer. The data can be “seized” if required under Section 19 of PACE, but that would require an offence to be suspected first, and ideally would be used as an adjunct to other evidence.

I have seen the download from a single vehicle fatal RTC involving a Jaguar; the data available was phenomenal, position of front wheels, throttle travel, gear selection, seat belt fitted (or not) etc. It even showed the TCS trying to get control after he dropped a cog and floored it. That data was accessed by Jaguar in order to assess if there was a fault with the vehicle. We then applied for the data in order to formulate the Coroner’s File.
Yes. I wrote a story a few years ago about mass-media accusations of 'spy in the boot' technology.

The technology to find out what was going on in a vehicle's last few moments before a crash has been embedded for some time - even in 'regular' vehicles. The UK press office of a Japanese manufacturer all but admitted it to me (to be clear: they're not unique) but it's not something that the manufacturers collectively wanted made more widely known because of the privacy issues and the way this would be spun by the newspapers.

In reality, there are plenty of ways that the vehicle could be tracked. The movement through mobile phone cells, for instance. Lots of top-end vehicles also use premium services for navigation, anti-theft and so on. It'd be fairly easy to check who was where, when and going how fast.




ETA: Just seen @brettarider's post on page 2 making the same point about phone cells.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
I know that road very well - at Pease Pottage it seamlessly becomes the A23 but is motorway standard until just outside Brighton. A few years ago, another toerag was doing a similar sort of thing going from Crawley to Brighton with 5 people in the car going at well over 100mph and bragging to someone about it on his mobile phone. Just before Pyecombe, the road does an 'S' which he misjudged and the car somersaulted over the barrier into the London bound side, killing himself, everyone else in the car and 3 people in cars going the other way, including a 3 year old lad whose parents had brought him down to Brighton for the day. Brave lad hung on in ICU for 3 days before succumbing and I think about it every time I drive past that spot and it still upsets me as it was nothing to do with the little feller. As a consequence, the A23/M23 is liberally sprinkled with ANPR and has a number of unmarked police cars regularly patrolling. I think that laddo will be getting a visit before long.
That stretch from Pease Pottage round to the Crawley turn-off is for some reason a deceptively fast stretch. I've caught myself well over the limit a few times, even in my remarkably normal car.

I'm not sure that there's ANPR on that stretch, though*; certainly farther south towards Brighton there are more unmarked cars on patrol, as you note, and coming up towards Gatwick there's more coverage.

Plus, of course, there's the average speed coverage on the smart motorway installation that's going on at the moment.




*Happy to be corrected if you know different.
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
One of the Major reasons for telematics in the early days, was cases of litigation in the event of an accident
the case I mentioned earlier in Manchester was one such case
also data on the engine and drive train, brakes, suspension etc can be monitored, and if faults are found it gives the manufactures far more information about the surroundings
Mercedes have had it installed for some considerable time, there was a recent case were a dodgy businessman owing thousands on the car, parked it well away from his home and office to prevent it being recovered by the loan company
he had quite a surprise when returning to a car park, his well concealed car was nowhere to be seen !!!
they had been tracking it and just waited for it to be parked at the same place for the same amount of time and it was uplifted
to be honest if you buy a high end car and it is not fitted with a tracking system you have no excuse not to install it
recently a business man advertising his high end Merc sports car, let two gentleman drive it with him accompanying them,
car returned to his house and they left saying they would be back with the money
1 am car vanishes
turns out they did a quick shuffle and sleight of hand, and left him with a fake Merc transponder, as they walked away it locked
they came back and away with it

boo hoo

Audis in particular are very easy to nick, but I wont put on here what they have been doing, but teenagers are able to pinch them with ease, and not using high end technology either

Motability have also started fitting tracking systems to some cars, this is to prevent unauthorised use, the car can be monitored as to driving style, where its parked and for how long, common with some larger efnic families is to claim a motability car and then it gets used for hire or reward, our loaned out to the wider diaspora
 
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I can just see someone now that its all over the press.

"Er hello, is that the Police, can I report a stolen Audi, it was on the drive last week and I have just noticed its gone, no not driven it in weeks due to lock down"

Next day a burnt out Audi R6 is found in some woods.


As in the report I posted Detective Inspector Greg Maides, from the East Midlands special operations unit, said: “After examining Shaun Davis’ mobiles phones, we found multiple videos of him driving grossly in excess of the maximum national speed limit, with no regard for the safety of other motorists, pedestrians or himself"
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
... data on the engine and drive train, brakes, suspension etc can be monitored, and if faults are found it gives the manufactures far more information about the surroundings
Mercedes have had it installed for some considerable time, there was a recent case were a dodgy businessman owing thousands on the car, parked it well away from his home and office to prevent it being recovered by the loan company
he had quite a surprise when returning to a car park, his well concealed car was nowhere to be seen !!!
they had been tracking it and just waited for it to be parked at the same place for the same amount of time and it was uplifted
...
The only data stored is that which is required by the restraints control systems, security systems and legislative requirements.
PSA group were generally ahead of the field in this regard, 'telematics' can be accessed on some of their vehicle range produced from 1997

Mercedes were not broadcasting / tracking all vehicles, tracking devices were fitted to vehicles which were purchased with (MB) finance or leased, these are / were distinctly separate to the standard equipment fitted to all vehicles in their range.
It'll come as no suprise that most vehicle hire companies fit trackers, many car dealership groups also fit them to the loan cars, one group that i'm aware of also track the vehicles in real time and will refuse loan cars on the basis of your treatment of the last one if certain parameters are exceeded.
 
Yes. I wrote a story a few years ago about mass-media accusations of 'spy in the boot' technology.

The technology to find out what was going on in a vehicle's last few moments before a crash has been embedded for some time - even in 'regular' vehicles. The UK press office of a Japanese manufacturer all but admitted it to me (to be clear: they're not unique) but it's not something that the manufacturers collectively wanted made more widely known because of the privacy issues and the way this would be spun by the newspapers.

In reality, there are plenty of ways that the vehicle could be tracked. The movement through mobile phone cells, for instance. Lots of top-end vehicles also use premium services for navigation, anti-theft and so on. It'd be fairly easy to check who was where, when and going how fast.




ETA: Just seen @brettarider's post on page 2 making the same point about phone cells.
The punk/Goth Bauhaus band got there before you both with their 1980 track Spy In The Cab, about the introduction of the tacograph into HGV vehicles (I kid you not) -

Coldly observing, callously reserving
A drivers time
Automated autonomy
Playing on his mind
The spy in the cab


 
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