Voluntary Redundancy - would you?

Would you opt for voluntary redundancy?

  • Yes

    Votes: 103 66.0%
  • No

    Votes: 31 19.9%
  • Over my dead body

    Votes: 22 14.1%

  • Total voters
    156
#1
Given that they're going to ask for voluntary redundancies (ahead of non-voluntary redundancies!), who would go for it? What's your price - because you can bet your bottom dollar they've learned the lesson from 'Options for Change'...
 
#3
If this was an option, who is going to pay for it?
 
#4
Not my personal experience, but my father in law was very glad indeed that he chose to leave in the first tranche of Options For Change - as a good but not outstanding Lt Col had he left later he would have struggled to standout from a larger crowd of ex-officers, and to subsequently develop a very successful civilian career.

Options was a fair while ago, but I'd be suprised if the same doesn't hold true today - times are tough in the outside job market.

Charlie
 
#7
Any DM(A) type people in the forum knocked up a redundancy calculator akin to the Pension Calc? That would be useful.
 
#11
There will be no volountary redundancy-if you read the DIN it says you will be able to apply to be made compulsorilly redundant.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
#12
DIB 2010/80 has just appeared. Can be sighted by those with a DII connection HERE

Service personnel

• To achieve the required reduced Armed Forces Manning levels a compulsory redundancy programme will be required.

• A DIN has been produced which outlines the broad principles that will be used to determine the specific personnel required for redundancy - DIN 2010DIN01-187: Regular Armed Forces Redundancy Programme. There is also a further DIN, 2010DIN01-188, called 'Redundancy Provisions for the Regular Armed Forces'. Both DINs can be found at Related documents.

• Specific single Service DINs will be published in approximately 6 months detailing the specific personnel requirements. No applications for redundancy are being called for at the moment.
 
#13
I know a few "Senior" Pers that have recently PVR'd, I bet their gutted!

It's now a waiting game to find out what the requirements are, 6 Months. Personally I would bite their hand off if the finances added up, with the current climate the Forces will be a grim place work for the next 5 years IMHO.
 
#14
With up 1/2 million other public servants allegedly heading for the job centre to add to the millions already there (and huge numbers are not even signed on), you'd be mad to volunteer for any sort of redundancy in the current economic climate.
 
#15
4(T) do you really think that? Even if the Pers that are taking redundancy could be leaving the Army in a few years anyway through natural wastage and will join the masses in the dole queue anyway, without a healthier redundancy package that could be offered now?
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
#16
I can honestly state that I love my job, and I love serving in the Army. I am not planning on going until they drag me kicking and screaming out the front gate, ripping my uniform from my body as I go.

I accept that we are going to suffer both in terms of workload and far less 'perks', but I think (hope) that it'll be a relatively short term pain that we will have to endure.

Face it guys, for the average soldier there is not much out there by way of decently paid employment.
 
#17
I know a few "Senior" Pers that have recently PVR'd, I bet their gutted!

It's now a waiting game to find out what the requirements are, 6 Months. Personally I would bite their hand off if the finances added up, with the current climate the Forces will be a grim place work for the next 5 years IMHO.
I bet they're really gutted that they are PVRing whilst on an Open Engagement....
 
#18
Given that they're going to ask for voluntary redundancies (ahead of non-voluntary redundancies!), who would go for it? What's your price - because you can bet your bottom dollar they've learned the lesson from 'Options for Change'...
What was the problem with Options for change in the 90s? I thought it was excellent. All the yes men stayed in their boxes, all the married with kids in MQs stayed allright ensuring future Stability, most of the career Officers stayed around using the old boy network, and lots of the useless scrotes were hoofed.
The ones who did benefit were those who had their eyes on a second career and were willing to jump into the property market when prices were low.
 
#20
It very much depends on the finances, but.....leave early, with an interesting and transferable skill set, onto an immediate pension and the prospect of a job that doesn't necessarily involve prolonged periods away from home on an appallingly regular basis? You'd have to be slightly insane not to at least consider it.

that said, there will definitely be two sides to this story. Anyone want to bet that half of those who go will probably get recalled onto FTRS for another Op HERRICK before too long?
 

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