Volley gun

#1
Remember Richard Sharpe's oppo having one of these in the Bernard Cornwell novels but has anyone ever seen one?

There's a little more information from the National Maritime Museum here:
Volley guns were designed by James Wilson and presented to the Board of Ordnance for trials in 1779. The Board decided these guns would be of most use on board ships and consequently they were purchased by the Admiralty for use in the fighting tops of naval vessels. Henry Nock became sole supplier of these weapons to the Navy. It appears that their first use was with Admiral Howe's fleet at the siege of Gibraltar in 1782. However, as all seven barrels fired at once, there was considerable risk of setting fire to the sails and thus the entire ship and so these guns were seldom used on board ship. Also as the barrels were rifled, they were difficult to load as well as delivering a ferocious kick from the recoil.
Seems surprising it was rifled when rifled arms didn't come into general use until years later. Makes a double rifle look straightforward!
 
#2
Since Sharp came out, these (and Baker rifles) are like rocking horse poo..

I know Dysons make repro Bakers, but Nocks are difficult to make and bl**dy useless, so thery were never popular...

www.peterdyson.co.uk
 
#3
Given the inaccuracy of most weapons of the time, and the fact that the nasty people tended to arrive en masse, there's a lot to be said for this "weapon of last resort".
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#5
There are a few press releases showing Dar o Paddy in a museum with an original. They wont be many around, believe if you google Volley gun abot 200 were made and most went to the Navy or some soft figure like that!
click, click, click, click, etc!
 
#6
ugly said:
There are a few press releases showing Dar o Paddy in a museum with an original. They wont be many around, believe if you google Volley gun abot 200 were made and most went to the Navy or some soft figure like that!
click, click, click, click, etc!
Most interesting but Sharpe Appreciation Society (SAS)? Tell me that wasn't deliberate :roll:
 
#8
The guy next Paddy O Doofer looks a little "slow".
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#9
Agreed, perhaps SAS stands for Special And Slow!
 
#10
blue_sophist said:
Given the inaccuracy of most weapons of the time, and the fact that the nasty people tended to arrive en masse, there's a lot to be said for this "weapon of last resort".
Any use against "Wild Donkeys"?
:thumleft: :thumleft: :blowkiss: :blowkiss:
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#11
I'm curious as to how lightening a rifle would reduce the recoil. Lightening the charge or load perhaps but lighten the rifle and there is less to absorb the recoil.
Strange what you read on t'internet!
 

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