Volcanic Tsunami possible after eruption in the Philippines

Warnings of ‘Volcanic Tsunami’ After Eruption in the Philippines.
Manila’s international airport also said on Twitter that flights to and from the airport were suspended because of the eruption.

It is that the official communique technique these days, just send out a tweet.?

Hundreds were evacuated and tremors were felt in nearby villages amid an eruption of the country’s second-most-active volcano, the Taal, about 40 miles from Manila.
By Jason Gutierrez Jan. 12, 2020Updated 7:15 a.m. ET. NYT Just reporting it now.
  • A dramatic explosion of the Philippines’ second-most-active volcano on Sunday prompted warnings of a possible “volcanic tsunami” as villagers were evacuated and nearby communities were advised to take precautions against any lake water surges.
The explosion, which sent a plume of ash half a mile into the air, came months after the volcano — Taal, about 40 miles south of Manila — began exhibiting a state of unrest. Tremors were felt on the volcano’s island and in villages around the nearby town of Agoncillo in Batangas Province, and booming noises from the volcano raised fears among residents.


The Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology raised its alert level for Taal Volcano to four out of five, indicating that a “hazardous eruption” was imminent.

Ordering the evacuation of hundreds of villagers, the institute warned that the eruption could cause a “volcanic tsunami.”
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Although volcano eruptions have been happening since the earth was formed Que CC experts blaming Global Warming for this.
 
At least it could be one Tsunami where the death toll is very slight, if they take heed of the warnings

I really can't image seeing one knowing you've no chance of outrunning it
 
I have visited the viewpoint above lake Taal on a number of occasions, the view from Tagaytay is spectacular. There has been volcanic seismic activity for many years, only today it combined the earthquake rumblings with a full on eruption! Fingers crossed for those who live nearby, as although it has become one of the favourite tourist spots the roads surrounding Taal aren't up to much.

As can be seen in the photo, the lake is quite large, and a number of fishing villages are in the immediate vicinity, the lake itself is surrounded by higher ground on 3 sides, so a tsunami would be a serious event. There are villages on the volcanic island itself, which have now been evacuated.
 

Attachments

Last edited:
At least it could be one Tsunami where the death toll is very slight, if they take heed of the warnings

I really can't image seeing one knowing you've no chance of outrunning it
Apparently a few people managed to outrun or survive the Mt St Helen's eruption, it's one thing being a scientist checking it out but Darwin must have had a week off because many of these people actually went to take a looky loo, the idiots.
 
Interesting place, looking at it on Google Maps. Seems to be a volcanic crater lake on an island in a lake on an island. And there seems to be a little island in the volcanic lake.

I’m not sure what a “volcanic tsunami” is supposed to mean. Seems a very strange term. I assume they mean a pyroclastic flow, what I was taught was a nuée ardente.

Good luck trying to outrun poison gas and superheated steam travelling at 60mph on a small island.
 
Interesting place, looking at it on Google Maps. Seems to be a volcanic crater lake on an island in a lake on an island. And there seems to be a little island in the volcanic lake.

I’m not sure what a “volcanic tsunami” is supposed to mean. Seems a very strange term. I assume they mean a pyroclastic flow, what I was taught was a nuée ardente.

Good luck trying to outrun poison gas and superheated steam travelling at 60mph on a small island.
Poor sods wouldn't stand an earthly ☹️
 
Interesting place, looking at it on Google Maps. Seems to be a volcanic crater lake on an island in a lake on an island. And there seems to be a little island in the volcanic lake.

I’m not sure what a “volcanic tsunami” is supposed to mean. Seems a very strange term. I assume they mean a pyroclastic flow, what I was taught was a nuée ardente.

Good luck trying to outrun poison gas and superheated steam travelling at 60mph on a small island.
I think they are referring to the possibility of a full on volcanic explosion, the volcano itself is very low down, and doesn't look much, but historically some of the volcanic activity has killed thousands in past events. In my photo there are fish farms and villages shown. The smaller island was active some 500 years ago, and on occasions has clouds of steam coming up into the crater.
 
RE #6

According to the article 6000 people were removed from the island, so they should be OK.
 
I think they are referring to the possibility of a full on volcanic explosion, the volcano itself is very low down, and doesn't look much, but historically some of the volcanic activity has killed thousands in past events. In my photo there are fish farms and villages shown. The smaller island was active some 500 years ago, and on occasions has clouds of steam coming up into the crater.
I get that. The possibility of a full on volcanic eruption looks high but it’s not a tsunami.

A tsunami is unlikely in a lake that is only 15 miles at its widest.

Presumably a journo is using the word in a figurative sense.

The people on the shore of the lake ought to be a bit worried as well. If there is a pyroclastic flow they are going to be hit with a cloud of steam, poison gas and rubbish that ain’t gonna stop in a hurry.

The last time that happened near a built-up area the best part of 30,000 people died within a few minutes: Mount Pelée - Wikipedia
 
I get that. The possibility of a full on volcanic eruption looks high but it’s not a tsunami.

A tsunami is unlikely in a lake that is only 15 miles at its widest.

Presumably a journo is using the word in a figurative sense.

The people on the shore of the lake ought to be a bit worried as well. If there is a pyroclastic flow they are going to be hit with a cloud of steam, poison gas and rubbish that ain’t gonna stop in a hurry.

The last time that happened near a built-up area the best part of 30,000 people died within a few minutes: Mount Pelée - Wikipedia
The Seismology institute of the Philippines is specifically mentioning the possibility of a Volcanic Tsunami, I'm presuming (as their site is in Tagalog) that the meaning is that if Taal blows its top, the inrush of lake water could lead to a much stronger explosion as water enters the magma chamber.

Sa naganap, itinataas ng DOST-PHIVOLCS sa Alert Level 4 ang estado ng Bulkang Taal kung saan posible ang mapanganib na pagputok sa loob ng ilang oras hanggang ilang araw. Mariing inuulit ng DOST-PHIVOLCS ang kabuuang paglikas mula sa Taal Volcano Island at karagdagang paglikas sa mapanganib o high-risk na mga lugar sa loob ng 14-kilometer radius mula sa Taal Main Crater dahil sa posibleng banta ng pagkakaroon ng pyroclastic density current (mabilis na daluyong ng napakainit na usok at abo) at volcanic tsunami. Ang mga lugar sa hilaga ng Bulkang Taal ay pinapayuhang magbantay at maging maingat sa epekto ng tuluy-tuloy at matagalang pag-ulan ng abo. Dapat payuhan ng civil aviation authorities ang mga sasakyang panghimpapawid na iwasan magpalipad sa paligid ng bulkan dahil sa panganib ng abo at ballistic fragments mula sa eruption column. Patuloy ang pagmamatyag ng DOST-PHIVOLCS sa aktibidad ng Taal Volcano at maglalabas ng update para sa publiko.

An earlier bulletin was released in English saying much the same:

his serves as notice for the raising of the alert status of Taal from Alert Level 3 (magmatic unrest) to Alert Level 4 (hazardous eruption imminent). As of 5:30 PM PST (1730H), eruptive activity at Taal Volcano Main Crater intensified as continuous eruption generated a tall 10-15 kilometer steam-laden tephra column with frequent volcanic lightning that rained wet ashfall on the general north as far as Quezon City. Volcanic tremor was recorded continuously since 11:00 AM and two volcanic earthquakes of magnitudes M2.5 and M3.9 were felt at Intensity III in Tagaytay City and Alitagtag, Batangas were recorded at 6:15 and 6:22 PM PST, respectively.

In view of the above, DOST-PHIVOLCS is now raising the alert status of Taal from Alert Level 3 to Alert Level 4. This means that hazardous explosive eruption is possible within hours to days. DOST-PHIVOLCS strongly reiterates total evacuation of Taal Volcano Island and additional evacuation of areas at high risk to pyroclastic density currents and volcanic tsunami within a 14-kilometer radius from Taal Main Crater. Areas in the general north of Taal Volcano are advised to guard against the effects of heavy and prolonged ashfall. Civil aviation authorities must advise aircraft to avoid the airspace around Taal Volcano as airborne ash and ballistic fragments from the eruption column pose hazards to aircraft. DOST-PHIVOLCS is continually monitoring the eruption and will update all stakeholders of furt

her developments
 

TamH70

MIA
I get that. The possibility of a full on volcanic eruption looks high but it’s not a tsunami.

A tsunami is unlikely in a lake that is only 15 miles at its widest.

Presumably a journo is using the word in a figurative sense.

The people on the shore of the lake ought to be a bit worried as well. If there is a pyroclastic flow they are going to be hit with a cloud of steam, poison gas and rubbish that ain’t gonna stop in a hurry.

The last time that happened near a built-up area the best part of 30,000 people died within a few minutes: Mount Pelée - Wikipedia
Agreed, the wording may be better, but there are such things as volcanic tsunamis, but it's not the eruptions that cause them rather than the effects of the eruption. What basically happens is big bits of volcano break off, land in the water, and the force of those big bits of rock ( which has a mass usually measured in megatonnes - but could reach the early GIGAtonnes) doing so, causes a very big splash, which causes a wave, which is the volcanic tsunami that the journos are talking about. You can definitely get one of those in a body of water that's only 15 miles wide if enough of the volcano takes a header into it.

I know geologists are a bit terrified of one happening in the Canary Islands, the "Cumbre Vieja Western Flank collapse" scenario. If that goes as bad as feared, you can kiss goodbye to large chunks of Western Europe, Africa and the Eastern Continental Seaboard of the United States.



Full disclosure - I did watch the BBC Horizon documentary referred to in the second link, and it sort of stuck in my mind as something to keep an eye on.
 
Still at level 4 - total evacuation of the islands and surrounding cities, possibility of a full eruption with the threat of Pyroclastic flow or Tsunami as a result! Evacuations are continuing.
 
You might also want to take a look at this too, earthquake induced landslide causing a megatsunami in a narrow bay. Same same but different.

Another cracker was the Thera/Santorini eruption. Probably the largest ever (known) volcanic eruption. The total collapse of the caldera caused mega-tsunamis across the Med.

I always felt a bit sorry for Lisbon, which got a triple whammy in the 1700s. First an earthquake which destroyed much of the city. Then a tsunami which continued the job. Then a firestorm from all the open fires, cooking grates etc which finished the job completely. People ran away from the earthquake, came back when it stopped, got killed by the tsunami and then cremated by the firestorm. Not a good day.

I just don’t see Taal generating a tsunami in a smallish lake. Looking at the map I assume the lake is a former, much larger caldera. Or several. Could be interesting though.
 
Just had a look at the latest status. Simmering nicely.


The time lapse film of the lightning is pretty impressive (less impressive is the BBC calling it lightening).
 
I just don’t see Taal generating a tsunami in a smallish lake. Looking at the map I assume the lake is a former, much larger caldera. Or several. Could be interesting though.
The eruption doesn't have to be limited to the size of the lake though. References to Taal are more likely to indicate location rather than extent. A subsurface/submarine eruption could be quite big.
 
The eruption doesn't have to be limited to the size of the lake though. References to Taal are more likely to indicate location rather than extent. A subsurface/submarine eruption could be quite big.
Taal's volcanoes, for there are 5 craters on the lower island and another volcano located to its northern edge which has the almost traditional shape of a volcano, are located in Lake Taal, which itself is the result of a larger explosion in prehistoric times. The erupting crater is located within a lake on the lower island. The viewpoint from where most of the photographs are taken are the edges of the crater formed when the original volcano exploded some 150,000 years ago! The view is spectacular, the edges of the former caldera are some 2,500 feet high.

The lightning is amazing, and is a relatively rare phenomenon. This eruption is providing a spectacular display!

Family as far away as Manila are working from home today, it is not safe to walk around without a mask, and the smell of sulphurous gases is quite strong in the street. There is now a 17Km radius exclusion zone from the eruption. Friends who have plantations in the region are sending photographs of their now ruined crops.
 

ches

LE
I know geologists are a bit terrified of one happening in the Canary Islands, the "Cumbre Vieja Western Flank collapse" scenario. If that goes as bad as feared, you can kiss goodbye to large chunks of Western Europe, Africa and the Eastern Continental Seaboard of the United States.



Full disclosure - I did watch the BBC Horizon documentary referred to in the second link, and it sort of stuck in my mind as something to keep an eye on.
Saw that docu at the time, as i recall the boffins were saying it won't be case of if, its a when. At some point a lot of the eastern US is going diffy.
 
Although volcano eruptions have been happening since the earth was formed Que CC experts blaming Global Warming for this.
According to Levitt & Dubner in their book "Super Freakonomics", when Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines went bang in 1991 it led to a 0.5 degree FALL in world temperatures for two years due to an increase in stratospheric sulphur dioxide acting as a layer of sunscreen.

Perhaps we should suggest to the greens that the only way to save the planet from global warming is to set off a few volcanoes, presumably by dropping nukes in the middle of them.
 
Agreed, the wording may be better, but there are such things as volcanic tsunamis, but it's not the eruptions that cause them rather than the effects of the eruption. What basically happens is big bits of volcano break off, land in the water, and the force of those big bits of rock ( which has a mass usually measured in megatonnes - but could reach the early GIGAtonnes) doing so, causes a very big splash, which causes a wave, which is the volcanic tsunami that the journos are talking about. You can definitely get one of those in a body of water that's only 15 miles wide if enough of the volcano takes a header into it.

I know geologists are a bit terrified of one happening in the Canary Islands, the "Cumbre Vieja Western Flank collapse" scenario. If that goes as bad as feared, you can kiss goodbye to large chunks of Western Europe, Africa and the Eastern Continental Seaboard of the United States.



Full disclosure - I did watch the BBC Horizon documentary referred to in the second link, and it sort of stuck in my mind as something to keep an eye on.
I hiked through it last year and its bloody massive. If one side was blown out the tsunami would dwarf anything we have seen thus far.
 

Latest Threads

Top