VJ Day 75 - Lead up, history, pics, links, preps, recipes

"We may allow ourselves a brief period of rejoicing; but let us not forget for a moment the toil and efforts that lie ahead. Japan, with all her treachery and greed, remains unsubdued. The injury she has inflicted on Great Britain, the United States, and other countries, and her detestable cruelties, call for justice and retribution. We must now devote all our strength and resources to the completion of our task, both at home and abroad. Advance, Britannia! Long live the cause of freedom! God save the King!"
Churchills VE Day speech in full

Prompted by a post by @mechanicalhorsetrough I thought we could have a thread for the lead up to VJ Day, where we can discuss, post pics, links, info, ideas for remembering and / or celebration. While thinking of the appalling conditions, disease and starvation so many thousands of allies suffered in jungles and at the hands of the Japanese, I still think a curry and some India Pale ale is fitting but I'm sure there must have been many would have longed for some good old British fare. Perhaps you have ideas of how you intend to mark VJ Day?

Britain's War In The Far East During The Second World War

VJ Day 75 | Remembrance Events | Royal British Legion
 
Last edited:

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
The Toyota factory is a few miles away - maybe I could torch the place whilst all the prisoners workers are in solitary confinement?

Thanks for the IWM link :thumleft:
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
Strangely enough, I found this a couple of weeks ago..
 
Today is the 75th Anniversary of the mission that dropped Little Boy on Hiroshima. My father was still in the service at that time, and was anxiously awaiting the announcement of the build up for the Invasion of Japan and his part in it.

Bombing of Hiroshima

Hiroshima was the primary target of the first atomic bombing mission on August 6, with Kokura and Nagasaki as alternative targets. The 393d Bombardment Squadron B-29 Enola Gay, named after Tibbets's mother and piloted by Tibbets, took off from North Field, Tinian, about six hours' flight time from Japan. Enola Gay was accompanied by two other B-29s: The Great Artiste, commanded by Major Charles Sweeney, which carried instrumentation, and a then-nameless aircraft later called Necessary Evil, commanded by Captain George Marquardt, which served as the photography aircraft.[126][clarification needed
After leaving Tinian, the aircraft made their way separately to Iwo Jima to rendezvous with Sweeney and Marquardt at 05:55 at 9,200 feet (2,800 m),[128] and set course for Japan. The aircraft arrived over the target in clear visibility at 31,060 feet (9,470 m).[129] Parsons, who was in command of the mission, armed the bomb in flight to minimize the risks during takeoff. He had witnessed four B-29s crash and burn at takeoff, and feared that a nuclear explosion would occur if a B-29 crashed with an armed Little Boy on board.[130] His assistant, Second Lieutenant Morris R. Jeppson, removed the safety devices 30 minutes before reaching the target area.[131]


During the night of August 5–6, Japanese early warning radar detected the approach of numerous American aircraft headed for the southern part of Japan. Radar detected 65 bombers headed for Saga, 102 bound for Maebashi, 261 en route to Nishinomiya, 111 headed for Ube and 66 bound for Imabari. An alert was given and radio broadcasting stopped in many cities, among them Hiroshima. The all-clear was sounded in Hiroshima at 00:05.[133] About an hour before the bombing, the air raid alert was sounded again, as Straight Flush flew over the city. It broadcast a short message which was picked up by Enola Gay. It read: "Cloud cover less than 3/10th at all altitudes. Advice: bomb primary."[134] The all-clear was sounded over Hiroshima again at 07:09.[135]

At 08:09, Tibbets started his bomb run and handed control over to his bombardier, Major Thomas Ferebee.[136] The release at 08:15 (Hiroshima time) went as planned, and the Little Boy containing about 64 kg (141 lb) of uranium-235 took 44.4 seconds to fall from the aircraft flying at about 31,000 feet (9,400 m) to a detonation height of about 1,900 feet (580 m) above the city.[137][138] Enola Gay traveled 11.5 mi (18.5 km) before it felt the shock waves from the blast.[139]

Due to crosswind, the bomb missed the aiming point, the Aioi Bridge, by approximately 800 ft (240 m) and detonated directly over Shima Surgical Clinic.[140] It released the equivalent energy of 16 ± 2 kilotons of TNT (66.9 ± 8.4 TJ).[137] The weapon was considered very inefficient, with only 1.7 percent of its material fissioning.[141] The radius of total destruction was about 1 mile (1.6 km), with resulting fires across 4.4 square miles (11 km2).[142]

Enola Gay stayed over the target area for two minutes and was ten miles away when the bomb detonated. Only Tibbets, Parsons, and Ferebee knew of the nature of the weapon; the others on the bomber were only told to expect a blinding flash and given black goggles. "It was hard to believe what we saw", Tibbets told reporters, while Parsons said "the whole thing was tremendous and awe-inspiring ... the men aboard with me gasped 'My God'". He and Tibbets compared the shockwave to "a close burst of ack-ack fire".
[143]

The war wasn't over yet, but after Nagasaki and the declaration of war by the Russians (eventually) against Japan, it was finally finished when the Emperor threw in the towel. My dad was one among many who were thankful and never doubted for a minute that dropping the bomb was necessary.

I reckon I'll mark the occasion by watching "Above and Beyond", a somewhat fictionalized account of the training of the 509th Composite Group. The movie was made in 1953 and stars Robert Taylor as COL Paul Tibbetts.
BG Paul W. Tibbets USAF (Ret).jpg
Little Boy Hiroshima Bomb.jpg
Mission to Hiroshima.JPG
 

KnockKnock

On ROPS
On ROPs
One of my drinking pals (now, sadly no longer with us) would tell of how when serving on a 'flat top' at the time of surrender, many Japanese prisoners were held on his aircraft carrier, and how the crew would make sure the prisoners were kept busy all the day, scrubbing the landing deck repeatedly.
 

goodoldboy

MIA
Book Reviewer
One of my drinking pals (now, sadly no longer with us) would tell of how when serving on a 'flat top' at the time of surrender, many Japanese prisoners were held on his aircraft carrier, and how the crew would make sure the prisoners were kept busy all the day, scrubbing the landing deck repeatedly.
Fascinating.
 

KnockKnock

On ROPS
On ROPs
'Fascinating' ??

Sarky?
But it's how word of mouth accounts, add to a complete record of WW11, this is from what later historians get an overall picture from, and pick out what is then factual?
 
Last edited:

Bodenplatte

War Hero
Paul Tibbets was pilot of Butcher Shop, lead ship of 97th Bomb Group (H) out of Polebrook on US Eighth Air Force Mission #1, the first US heavy bomber raid over Europe. Rouen, 17 August 1942.

First In, Last Out (almost)
 
Bump, this excellently intentioned thread seems to have something in common with the Forgotten Army.
 
One of my drinking pals (now, sadly no longer with us) would tell of how when serving on a 'flat top' at the time of surrender, many Japanese prisoners were held on his aircraft carrier, and how the crew would make sure the prisoners were kept busy all the day, scrubbing the landing deck repeatedly.
Very sensible action
 
Watched the flypast on BBC1 and some accounts and readings.
Good speech by HRH Prince of Wales I thought.
Might catch up with the rest on iPlayer.
Mulligatawny soup for lunch. That would have been a dreamt of luxury for many.
Some itchy insect bites don't even come close to Burmese mosquito bites etc but it can make you think.
 
Last edited:
BBC1 VJ Day 75 The Nation's Tribute.
Gurka band, medley of well known tunes
Flypast,
Lumley looking fab and in good voice.
Good speech from Prince William, Duke of Cambridge
Short anecdotes from Burma veterans
Ruby Turner and supporting singers
Anecdotes from relatives of veterans no longer with us.
Clever image projection as per D Day commemorations.
Childhood recollections were given of Singapore, eating mice and chewing tar because they were starving.
Nicola Roberts. Pretty red haired singer.
Japanese atrocities recounted.
Chindits recollections.
Dame Vera Lynn's account of her visit to Burma read by Sheridan Smith. She had a few tears while watching the projections of the veterans recounting the impact Dame Vera made in those conditions. Sheridan then sang some songs.
Turning point - 14th Army starts at a disadvantage but learns well and starts to push Japanese back.
Some opera type singer bloke. Welsh Kenneth McKellar walt?
Battle of Kohima and airdrops in monsoon rain.
Martin Shaw reads from General Slim's memoirs.
British Pacific Fleet (inc Canadians and others). Kamikaze attacks and sunken ships.
The A bomb and the moral dilemma.
Burma campaign member and daughter of a Japanese soldier recounts the animosity against the Japanese but not so much animosity from the Japanese over the bombs and how she saw the need for reconciliation.
REME Burma veteran concludes the spoken proceedings - excellent speech - he hopes current and coming generations appreciate the freedoms that were fought for and not to take them for granted. Finally to remember all those who died and fought for those freedoms.
Willard white concludes with You will never walk alone.
 
Last edited:
BBC1 JC Day 75 The Nation's Tribute.
Gurka band, medley of well known tunes
Flypast,
Lumley looking fab and in good voice.
Good speech from Prince William, Duke of Cambridge
Short anecdotes from Burmah veterans
Ruby Turner and supporting singers
Anecdotes from relatives of veterans no longer with us.
This had been a long-planned public event which, thanks to Covid, has had to be completely rehashed.
 

PFGEN

GCM
So far so good and better than I expected.
Got in late today and catching the end of this. Wish I'd seen the whole thing as I'm finding it rather good. Seeing Lumley in another light as a commentator. Would be happy to see her presenting like this at similar future events. I hope this gets a repeat.
 
Got in late today and catching the end of this. Wish I'd seen the whole thing as I'm finding it rather good. Seeing Lumley in another light as a commentator. Would be happy to see her presenting like this at similar future events. I hope this gets a repeat.
This morning and this evenings commemorations will be on BBC iPlayer.

iPlayer links:
VJ Day 75 - The Nation Remembers
VJ Day 75 - The Nation’s Tribute

Search result listing VJ articles on BBC site:BBC - Search results for vj

There will be other material for celebrations in commonwealth and allied countries.
 
Last edited:

PFGEN

GCM
Below is a photo of my grandmother that I found recently. China never had conscription in WW2 and when war broke out my grandma was just a maths teacher. As a child an ant was enough to make her cry. However, such was determination to fight off Japanese invaders that my grandma ran away from a comfortable middle class home to join up.She joined the Kuomingtang army (not the communists
) and was commissioned as a Lieutenant (the fact that she has 4 pockets signifies that she's an officer). As a female officer my grandma did not see front line action but many of her comrades did, many of whom went on to serve alongside British troops in Burma.
1597527945471.png
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
Below is a photo of my grandmother that I found recently. China never had conscription in WW2 and when war broke out my grandma was just a maths teacher. As a child an ant was enough to make her cry. However, such was determination to fight off Japanese invaders that my grandma ran away from a comfortable middle class home to join up.She joined the Kuomingtang army (not the communists ) and was commissioned as a Lieutenant (the fact that she has 4 pockets signifies that she's an officer). As a female officer my grandma did not see front line action but many of her comrades did, many of whom went on to serve alongside British troops in Burma. View attachment 497378
To your Grandmother and all that contributed to the defeat of Japan & Germany in the second World War, on behalf of my family and I, 'Thank You'. It's not much, but it is a heartfelt, genuine appreciation of all you did and the sacrifices you made.
 

New Posts

Latest Threads

Top