Vietnam Memorial Facts

#1
Apologies if this has been around before but I just got it from one of my corporals from 42 years ago who still considers me "his officer" and i honor him by posting it.

Semper Fi Dan Davis, Corporal of Marines


To all of my family and friends and Marines that I had the pleasure of serving with in the military and Vietnam, I forward this to you so we all will never forget our service to our country, and hopefully the nation will never forget what we went through.

Daniel Davis Corporal U.S.M.C. 1970-1973 Vietnam Veteran

[HR][/HR]From:
Date: Sat, 28 Apr 2012 17:04:47 -0400
Subject: Fwd: The Vietnam Memorial Wall



Sent: 4/28/2012 4:52:31 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time
Subj: The Vietnam Memorial Wall


Posted by MG Hank Stelling USAF ret



I think the Vietnam Memorial Wall is something this country got right. A
little history most people will never know and a refresher for those that
do know.
Hank

Memorial Wall

There are 58,267 names now listed on that polished black wall, including
those added in 2010.

The names are arranged in the order in which they were taken from us by
date and within each date the names are alphabetized. It is hard to
believe it is 36 years since the last casualties.

The first known casualty was Richard B. Fitzgibbon, of North Weymouth ,
Mass. Listed by the U.S. Department of Defense as having been killed on
June 8, 1956. His name is listed on the Wall with that of his son,
Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Richard B. Fitzgibbon III, who was killed on
Sept. 7, 1965.

There are three sets of fathers and sons on the Wall.

39,996 on the Wall were just 22 or younger.

8,283 were just 19 years old.

The largest age group, 33,103 were 18 years old.

12 soldiers on the Wall were 17 years old.

5 soldiers on the Wall were 16 years old.

One soldier, PFC Dan Bullock was 15 years old.

997 soldiers were killed on their first day in Vietnam ..

1,448 soldiers were killed on their last day in Vietnam ..

31 sets of brothers are on the Wall.

Thirty one sets of parents lost two of their sons.

54 soldiers attended Thomas Edison High School in Philadelphia . I
wonder why so many from one school.

8 Women are on the Wall. Nursing the wounded.

244 soldiers were awarded the Medal of Honor during the Vietnam War; 153
of them are on the Wall.

Beallsville, Ohio with a population of 475 lost 6 of her sons.

West Virginia had the highest casualty rate per capita in the nation.
There are 711 West Virginians on the Wall.

The Marines of Morenci - They led some of the scrappiest high school
football and basketball teams that the little Arizona copper town of
Morenci (pop. 5,058) had ever known and cheered. They enjoyed roaring
beer busts. In quieter moments, they rode horses along the Coronado
Trail, stalked deer in the Apache National Forest. And in the patriotic
camaraderie typical of Morenci's mining families, the nine graduates of
Morenci High enlisted as a group in the Marine Corps. Their service
began on Independence Day, 1966. Only 3 returned home.

The Buddies of Midvale - LeRoy Tafoya, Jimmy Martinez, Tom Gonzales were
all boyhood friends and lived on three consecutive streets in Midvale,
Utah on Fifth, Sixth and Seventh avenues. They lived only a few yards
apart. They played ball at the adjacent sandlot ball field. And they all
went to Vietnam. In a span of 16 dark days in late 1967, all three would
be killed. LeRoy was killed on Wednesday, Nov. 22, the fourth
anniversary of John F. Kennedy's assassination. Jimmy died less than 24
hours later on Thanksgiving Day. Tom was shot dead assaulting the enemy
on Dec. 7, Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day.

The most casualty deaths for a single day was on January 31, 1968… 245
deaths, during the TET OFFENSIVE. The most casualties suffered on
January 31st - 2nd BN., 5th Marine Reg., 1st Marine Division Regiment
FMF (Pacific) Reinforced - III MAF at Hue.

The most casualty deaths for a single month was May 1968 - 2,415
casualties were incurred.

For most Americans who read this they will only see the numbers that the
Vietnam War created. To those of us who survived the war, and to the
families of those who did not, we see the faces, we feel the pain that
these numbers created. We are, until we too pass away, haunted with
these numbers, because they were our friends, fathers, husbands, wives,
sons and daughters. There are no noble wars, just noble warriors. Please
pass this on to those who served during this time, and those who DO Care
I've also sent this to those I know who do care very much.


 
#3
I have visit the memorial on every trip I have made to DC since the monument was built. There is really something very beautiful and moving about it. The father of a good friend is listed on the wall.

It is amazing that the architect, Maya Lin, was a 21 year old student, studying for he B.Arch. at Yale when she won the competition to design the memorial. Amazing vision for a young woman.
 
#4
Fitzgibbon was certainly not the first 'known' casualty, the first known casualty was Dewey killed by the Viet Minh in 1945, followed by the combat deaths of McGovern and Buford in 1954. Lest we forget.
 
#5
I believe that there are two Brits remembered on there too. Like Rick Rescorla and a few others, they joined the US army and fought in VN.
 
#6
I believe that there are two Brits remembered on there too. Like Rick Rescorla and a few others, they joined the US army and fought in VN.
I'd be very surprised if Rescorla was listed. But I would be very interested to know if someone has compiled a list of the Brits that are?
 
#7
It is amazing that the architect, Maya Lin, was a 21 year old student, studying for he B.Arch. at Yale when she won the competition to design the memorial. Amazing vision for a young woman.
Indeed.

By coincidence a friend and former neighbour of ours (in UK) is a Chinese lady who was a lifelong friend of Linn's mother. If memory serves me, they were classmates at Smith College (somewhere I'm certain you'll be familiar with)

After we had spoken to our friend after visiting the wall, she mentioned two things that have stuck in memory.

One was that Linn's tutor had tried to persuade her not to enter the competition saying that her design lacked merit and therefore little chance of winning (despite him having entered the competion himself). Fortunately she persevered and submitted.

Secondly, that Linn is extremely modest about her achievement, preferring to be judged by the overall quality of her work rather than a one-off.

Of course there maybe an element of family legend in the above but I prefer to believe that its true.
 
#8
I'd be very surprised if Rescorla was listed. But I would be very interested to know if someone has compiled a list of the Brits that are?
The gallant Rescorla died in the 9/11 attack in NYC saving people of the company he was head of security for. Since he did not die in Vietnam he would not be on the wall.
 
#9
The gallant Rescorla died in the 9/11 attack in NYC saving people of the company he was head of security for. Since he did not die in Vietnam he would not be on the wall.
JJH - I remember a there was a public movement trying to get a MoH awarded to Rescorla for his actions on 9/11.
Was it sucsessful? Or was it not considered due to his not being in service at the time, and was he given another medal/award instead (the UK would not issue a VC for this but a GM instead as a 'member of the public' type medal).

Sorry to take the thread off subject, and thanks for posting the original email.
 
#10
JJH - I remember a there was a public movement trying to get a MoH awarded to Rescorla for his actions on 9/11.
Was it sucsessful? Or was it not considered due to his not being in service at the time, and was he given another medal/award instead (the UK would not issue a VC for this but a GM instead as a 'member of the public' type medal).

Sorry to take the thread off subject, and thanks for posting the original email.
I am unaware of that but the MOH would not be possible since he was not serving at the time.
 
#11
The gallant Rescorla died in the 9/11 attack in NYC saving people of the company he was head of security for. Since he did not die in Vietnam he would not be on the wall.
Also one of my former colleagues in the Northern Rhodesia Police in the early 60's!
Prior to the NRP he had been in the Parachute Regiment. Was awarded the Silver Star whilst in the US Army in Vietnam prior to becoming a VP of Security for Morgan Stanley in the WTC!

see here :- http://rickrescorla.com/
 
#12
As I write this there is a huge and I mean humongous firework display taking place from Danang beach and being broadcast live on Vn TV. Countries represented there are Vietnam, USA, Australia, Korea, Russia, China and several others.This is not a victory celebration as such, but a commemoration and some of the music accompanying the displays is very sad and thought provoking.

In memory of all who were killed during that terrible war.
 
#13
I visited the memorial in 84, before the statue had been erected, it is a very restrained and dignified edifice, I intend no offence when I say I found it to be un-American in that respect. Also the people there were quiet and thoughtful.

There was at least one Union Jack in the ground before it. Also an MIA stand with some veterans who I chatted with for a while.

Rick Rescorla was mentioned in the book of the battle of La Drang, but airbrushed out of the film, I don't think Mr Gibson likes the Brits much.

I'm glad I visited it.
 
#14
I visited the memorial in 84, before the statue had been erected, it is a very restrained and dignified edifice, I intend no offence when I say I found it to be un-American in that respect. Also the people there were quiet and thoughtful.

There was at least one Union Jack in the ground before it. Also an MIA stand with some veterans who I chatted with for a while.

Rick Rescorla was mentioned in the book of the battle of La Drang, but airbrushed out of the film, I don't think Mr Gibson likes the Brits much.

I'm glad I visited it.
That is why I will not see the film since as anyone reading the book will see how pivotal a role then 1stLt Rescorla played in the Ia Drang fight. I do not think it hyperbole to suggest that battle could well have ended in a crushing defeat were it not for his presence of mind and courage to run full speed through heavy fire to provide critical leadership to the rear of the column that was effectively cut in half by the ambush.

IMHO he deserved at least the DSC.
 
#15
Each time I that I have been in Washington D.C. I have ensured that I have visited the Vietnam Memorial - it is quite simply a truly humbling piece of public sculpture which honours the dead and comforts the living. For me, at least, the symbology of the three soldiers emerging, as if from a jungle clearing, and encountering the memorial is deeply moving.
 
#16
This probably belongs on another thread but in answer to the questions about Brits in Vietnam, I had a sergeant who was English.

I also served with a Marine officer who was a Scot--first name Alistair. He later fell on his sword so to speak by posing nude for Playgirl magazine along with other members of the USMC rugby team. He also got involved with a deployed enlisted Marine's wife and was cashiered from the Corps. Too bad since he was a great combat recon officer.
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
#17
Visited the memorial in 1988 - I thought it exactly the right design. People tracing their lost ones' names with their fingers - that was immensely moving. Name, after name, after name.
 
#18
Indeed.

By coincidence a friend and former neighbour of ours (in UK) is a Chinese lady who was a lifelong friend of Linn's mother. If memory serves me, they were classmates at Smith College (somewhere I'm certain you'll be familiar with)

After we had spoken to our friend after visiting the wall, she mentioned two things that have stuck in memory.

One was that Linn's tutor had tried to persuade her not to enter the competition saying that her design lacked merit and therefore little chance of winning (despite him having entered the competion himself). Fortunately she persevered and submitted.

Secondly, that Linn is extremely modest about her achievement, preferring to be judged by the overall quality of her work rather than a one-off.

Of course there maybe an element of family legend in the above but I prefer to believe that its true.
I think she was a very unassuming younng woman. I met her briefly twice in the early 80's. Once were were next to each other in line at a camera store waiting to pick up photos. She looked and dressed like any other young univ student and I had no idea who she was until she had to tell the clerk her name. Another time I was standing in front of the Harvard Sq. fire station talking to a firefighter friend and she stopped to ask us directions.

Smith College is an excellent women's college in Massachusetts. Her dad was a dean at a university in the midwest. She comes by here brains honestly.

From the Vietnam Memorial there is a clear view past Lincoln Memorial to Arlington National Cemetary. The father of a friend was a two star killed in 1970. The first time I visited the Vietnam Memorial I found his name and looked across to Arlington where he is buried. I then was moved to walk the 2-3 miles across to Arlington to visit his grave, up on a hill not far from President Kennedy. The memorial is very powerful in its emotional impact to any who visit.
 
#19
The gallant Rescorla died in the 9/11 attack in NYC saving people of the company he was head of security for. Since he did not die in Vietnam he would not be on the wall.
Sorry, my post was badly written. I know Rescorla isn't on the Wall, what I meant was other Brits like him fighting for the US in VN,

I went to the Wall in 1990, and chatting to one of the Vets there he said that there were a number of Brits listed on the Wall as fallen in VN. Sadly I can't remember how many he said.
 

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