Video: C47/ DC-3 Fleet Operating Over Columbia

#3
Seat of the pants flying - gutsy stuff.
I last flew in a C-47 in '79 and it was scary then.
The jump was a relief!
:pale:
 
#8
Technically not accurate though surely? FW and rotary metres apart? Great picture though the two would never ever be in that close proximity.
 
#9
@MisterFormaldyhyde Someone should probably revoke the artist's artistic license. No way a chopper would fly that close to paratroopers, as you say. I would have thought that the C47, being smaller and slower than the C130, could probably get in closer to its DZ and drop paratroopers with greater accuracy. RLI would occasionally jump from 500 feet, I'm told. Barely time to do anything if anything goes wrong.
 
#10
Basler in Oshkosh overhaul DC-3/C-47s to near enough new condition and fit two Pt-6 turboprops, to keep the old lady going for another fifty odd years. That's what the Colombian Air force are using as bombers/gunships/para droppers/airlifters, alongside more modern turbos.
 
#11
Basler in Oshkosh overhaul DC-3/C-47s to near enough new condition and fit two Pt-6 turboprops, to keep the old lady going for another fifty odd years. That's what the Colombian Air force are using as bombers/gunships/para droppers/airlifters, alongside more modern turbos.
Do you know what has happened to all those Rhodesian Air Force Daks? Check out this site. Douglas DC-3 C-47 C/N 42978 ZS-FRJ for the history of one DC3 that began life working for Swissair in 1946 and is now awaiting refurbishment in South Africa.
 
#12
Technically not accurate though surely? FW and rotary metres apart? Great picture though the two would never ever be in that close proximity.
Yes they would as the op required. It's likely the Alouettes were controlling the descent. The picture angle gives a false impression of height and proximity.
The troupies under the canopy could have well been deliberately dropped in a position for the helicopters to pick them up and drop them closer to other battlefield pressure points. They may well even been carrying fuel for the the helios.
 
#14
it only gives you a few seconds under canopy and it keeps you out of the eyeball of the enemy, long enough for you to get to earth and get unstrapped and away. Downside, if the chute fails, you've got mere seconds left...
 
#15
...There's no great fuss about a 400' / 450' exit height, providing the part of the ground you land on isn't 200' above the local surrounds :)

Happened at night IIRC. Came as a bit of a shock to the folks landing on the hill.


it only gives you a few seconds under canopy and it keeps you out of the eyeball of the enemy, long enough for you to get to earth and get unstrapped and away. Downside, if the chute fails, you've got mere seconds left...
Nothing to stop you watching the deployment (if you left the door properly) and start chucking out the other bag of laundry if you don't like what you see.
 
#16
Yes they would as the op required. It's likely the Alouettes were controlling the descent. The picture angle gives a false impression of height and proximity.
The troupies under the canopy could have well been deliberately dropped in a position for the helicopters to pick them up and drop them closer to other battlefield pressure points. They may well even been carrying fuel for the the helios.
I stand corrected and thanks. So who would have carried out such a a drop and where / when? I'm assuming not a UK operation? I think @Colonel Blimp implied Rhodeisans?
 
#17
I stand corrected and thanks. So who would have carried out such a a drop and where / when? I'm assuming not a UK operation? I think @Colonel Blimp implied Rhodeisans?
Rhodies. The only other nation that would have commuted troops in such a manner in that scenario would have been the French, resourceful and determined as always.
 
#18
Basler in Oshkosh overhaul DC-3/C-47s to near enough new condition and fit two Pt-6 turboprops, to keep the old lady going for another fifty odd years. That's what the Colombian Air force are using as bombers/gunships/para droppers/airlifters, alongside more modern turbos.
The nice thing is that you still get plenty of spare parts for the DC-3 / C-47, even newly made ones, including for the old piston engines.
 
#19
it only gives you a few seconds under canopy and it keeps you out of the eyeball of the enemy, long enough for you to get to earth and get unstrapped and away. Downside, if the chute fails, you've got mere seconds left...
Actually, the area would have been prepped by circling K-Cars, which were Alouettes with 20 mil cannons sticking out of the side. The coordination was usually so good that the moment they lifted their fires, the Daks would be dropping paratroopers and the Alouettes carrying soldiers would be unloading. It was a very precise and well-oiled drill. The RLI holds the world record for the number of op jumps. And out of an aircraft whose best days are not yet over.
 
#20
The RLI holds the world record for the number of op jumps. And out of an aircraft whose best days are not yet over.
Ironic really as I'm informed that the RLI unlike their other brothers in arms did not receive para pay.

As for the Dak - I believe that one of the airframes on the Chimoio operation had dropped troops on D Day ( WW2).
 

Similar threads

New Posts

Latest Threads

Top