Victoria Cross Stamps

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
#1
I hope Militaria is the correct forum for this post but I've no idea where I'd post it else.

I've just received an e-mail informing me that the GPO (or whatever they're calling themselves this week,) are producing stamps featuring a VC winner. I hope and imagine this might be the start of a series culminating in Beharry VC's citation - or perhaps another sldr if a further VC gets issued.
If nothing else it raises the profile of the forces in the public eye once again, but I know which stamps I'll be using on my letters as long as they're about.

Here's the bumf:

Good news!

1st class stamps here in the UK are as follows:

VC for Brave Gurkha - Single-handed Assault

A rifleman's extraordinary courage in the face of withering fire saved
his company after they had become pinned down in the Burmese jungle.
Breaking his cover, Corporal Agansing Rai charged directly at the enemy
position, firing as he ran. Three-machine gunners fell to the Gurkha
NCO as his men surged and took the strongpoint. He launched a fresh
attack on the enemy bunker, advancing ....

That is where it ends on the stamp.
Anyone else know owt about this ?
 
#2
Bit more info here, Cuts.

I shall be stocking up pronto!

Edited to add that the Royal Snail marketing dept don't take long to show the depth of their secondary moddun educashun by stating here that the medal was awarded to recognise bravery. Actually no, QV specifically changed the decoration to read 'For Valour' because she felt that all of her soldiers were brave. Hey, ho. At least they got in their 'Peace Studies' bit about not glorifying war.
Give me strength...
 
#3
[url=http://www.royalmail.com/portal/rm/content1?catId=22900498&mediaId=33800670]bit more detail[/url] said:
1st Class – Jack Cornwell
At the age of 15 Jack Cornwell joined the Navy, and a year later he was on board HMS Chester working as range-layer for the six inch gun. On May 31 1916 the Chester led the British fleet into the Battle of Jutland and was set upon by four enemy cruisers. In a letter to his mother after the battle his captain wrote of him: “He remained steady at his most exposed post… he felt that he might be needed, and indeed he might have been; so he stayed there, standing and waiting, under heavy fire, with just his own brave heart and God’s help to support him.”

1st Class – Agansing Rai
In 1944 at the age of just 24, Agansing Rai was a Corporal in the 2/5th Ghurkha Rifles fighting the elite Japanese 33rd Division that was attacking north through Burma. Agansing Rai led his troops uphill against an enemy machine gun nest and personally killed three of the four soldiers. Then, when a Japanese anti-tank gun opened fire from the nearby jungle, he led another charge again killing three of the enemy. This left the Ghurkhas under heavy machine gun fire from a bunker, and once again Agansing Rai attacked single handed and killed all four occupants.

64p - Charles Lucas
In January 1856 the HMS Hecla, a six gun steam-driven paddle sloop, was one of three ships bombarding a Russian fort on the Aland Islands off the coast of Finland. When a live enemy shell landed on deck everyone on board was ordered to lie flat, but Charles Lucas ignored the order and threw the shell overboard before it exploded. This action earned Lucas the first VC, presented by Queen Victoria herself in 1857 in Hyde Park.

64p - Noel Chavasse
Noel Chavasse is one of only three men to have won the VC twice, known as the VC and bar, both times for gallantry on the Western Front. On August 9 1916 he tended casualties under enemy fire and in plain sight for an entire day and into the night. The following day he was wounded himself, but continued to venture into No Man’s Land to find more injured men. He was awarded the VC for these actions and then a year later received his bar after being mortally wounded tending casualties.

72p - Albert Ball
Albert Ball was awarded a posthumous VC for the actions he performed in the final fortnight of his life. A member of the Royal Flying Corps, he preferred to fly alone. At a time when German planes were technically superior, he took part in twenty-six combats and destroyed eleven planes, drove two out of control and forced many others to land. On one occasion he fought six enemy planes on his own. Even when his plane was badly damaged he would have to be restrained from immediately going out in another. He was killed in combat at the age of 20.

72p - Charles Upham
Of the three people that have been awarded the VC twice, only one was a combatant. Charles Upham was a New Zealander, and in 1941 he was in Crete fighting against German paratroopers. Despite being ill, he displayed extraordinary courage and three times routed German machine gun posts in close quarter battles, earning him the VC. He was awarded the bar a year later when in North Africa, he led a night time bayonet charge. A month later he was taken prisoner and put in Colditz, the infamous German prison camp.
I shall doff my hat before posting any letters this year..

PB
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
#4
Thanks lads.

And to Stickybomb & PassingBells for the extra gen.
 
#5
PassingBells said:
[url=http://www.royalmail.com/portal/rm/content1?catId=22900498&mediaId=33800670]bit more detail[/url] said:
1st Class – Jack Cornwell
At the age of 15 Jack Cornwell joined the Navy, and a year later he was on board HMS Chester working as range-layer for the six inch gun. On May 31 1916 the Chester led the British fleet into the Battle of Jutland and was set upon by four enemy cruisers. In a letter to his mother after the battle his captain wrote of him: “He remained steady at his most exposed post… he felt that he might be needed, and indeed he might have been; so he stayed there, standing and waiting, under heavy fire, with just his own brave heart and God’s help to support him.”

PB
And yet the Royal Snail proudly boasts "the stamps feature six of the brave soldiers"

You would have thought the Navy uniform might have given it away... :roll:
 

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