Veteran's 'rights' - Your view

Veterans should be entitled to:

  • Priority NHS treatment for life.

    Votes: 18 14.9%
  • Priority NHS treatment for service related injuries.

    Votes: 104 86.0%
  • Free private medical treatment for service related injuries.

    Votes: 42 34.7%
  • Priority access for children's school places.

    Votes: 27 22.3%
  • Discounted mortgage rates for life.

    Votes: 15 12.4%
  • Tax free pensions.

    Votes: 40 33.1%
  • Priority access to Local Authority housing.

    Votes: 59 48.8%
  • Discounted rent on Local Authority housing.

    Votes: 21 17.4%
  • Free annual private medical exams for physical and mental health.

    Votes: 33 27.3%
  • Guaranteed job interviews when applying for roles within the public sector.

    Votes: 41 33.9%

  • Total voters
    121
#1
There has been much discussion over the past year regarding Veteran's rights or lack of them. Where do you stand on this issue? Please choose all the options that you think we should be entitled to. I've maxed out the options but did have some others at the back of my mind too. As this is currently in the Int Cell please mind your Ps and Qs. QUICK EDIT - JUST TO CLARIFY, THESE OPTIONS DO NOT ECHO MY BELIEFS! :)
 
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#2
Treatment for service related injuries, the rest are silly.
 
#3
There has been much discussion over the past year regarding Veteran's rights or lack of them. Where do you stand on this issue? Please choose all the options that you think we should be entitled to. I've maxed out the options but did have some others at the back of my mind too. As this is currently in the Int Cell please mind your Ps and Qs.
There’s a world of difference between what I would like to be entitled to, and what I believe is morally correct.

I don’t think that veterans should be entitled to much different than we already are - except that any injury (non-emergency) caused/aggravated should be prioritised (but not ahead of more serious issues with others).

If it’s a blank slate, however, I’d like a licence to kill those I disagree with, a daily sackful of cash and 3/5 of the Spice Girls.
 
#4
Treatment for service related injuries, the rest are silly.
Yep, with you on that .......OP forgets or ignores that many Toms were toerags before they joined up and are still toerags when they leave.

We volunteered, we got paid....we fecked off. End off


However, as a recruiting tool it may have some legs?.....for those stupid enough to believe it.
 
#6
Yep, with you on that .......OP forgets or ignores that many Toms were toerags before they joined up and are still toerags when they leave.

We volunteered, we got paid....we fecked off. End off


However, as a recruiting tool it may have some legs?.....for those stupid enough to believe it.
OP agrees with you. Not saying I agree with any/all of the options I've posted.
 
#7
Service guarantees citizenship.
Should be enough for anyone
 
#8
Sorry mate, call me a dick, most probably will, but apart from the second one, I don't think we necessarily deserve any of the above. Most of the above just seem to be charter to have shit admin once you've left and be 'entitled' to it, similar to all the benefit scum that ARRSE so likes to denigrate.

The 'SAS Hero Bob deserves a house because his business skills and personal life are shite' line is weak and makes us all look like whiney chancers.

My view is enhance the resettlement to something meaningful, with a Leavers Mentor in each unit to ensure that Sgt. Admin isn't going to leave in 3 days and assume that his council will give him a house. Bump up the financial package to those who have left >22yrs, to ensure they're not destitute, and lastly have some proper support mechanism (MoD financed) whereby Ex-serving can get proper advice, and emotional and financial support. It should be like a leavers probation period and you're eventually signed off once you and the Org agree you're stable enough to do your own thing. Relying on the RBL, SSAFA or Regiment Associations isn't good enough.

What we do is a job, although with lots of risks involved, it shouldn't be a gimme gimme gimme charter to do just 2 yrs and then reap the benefits that most others in the country would dearly love too.

There, I've said it
 
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#9
Sorry mate, call me a dick, most probably will, but apart from the second one, I don't think we necessarily deserve any of the above. Most of the above just seem to be charter to have shit admin once you've left and be 'entitled' to it, similar to all the benefit scum that ARRSE so likes to denigrate.

The 'SAS Hero Bob deserves a house because his business skills and personal life are shite' line is weak and makes us all look live whiney chancers.

My view is enhance the resettlement to something meaningful, with a Leavers Mentor in each unit to ensure that Sgt. Admin isn't going to leave in 3 days and assume that his council will give him a house. Bump up the financial package to those who have left >22yrs, to ensure they're not destitute, and lastly have some proper support mechanism (MoD financed) whereby Ex-serving can get proper advice, and emotional and financial support. It should be like a leavers probation period and you're eventually signed off once you and the Org agree you're stable enough to do your own thing. Relying on the RBL, SSAFA or Regiment Associations isn't good enough.
The resettlement package is already better than any other job I’ve heard of. Tesco sure as hell don’t give you as much support when you tell them to poke their job.

You could give some people £1million when they leave and a year later they’d be living under a bridge.

If people are destitute after 22 years then they’re probably idiots and likely deserve it. It’d be throwing good money after bad.
 
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#10
Look after those who we injured physically and mentally (although their are a fair few riding on the coattails of PTSD unfortunately).

Pay them the pension terms that they initially signed up to or voluntary signed up to (whatever the cost)

Then join the queue like everyone else.

As far as I am aware, no is conscripted, no one is forced to join and everyone gets a fairly decent wage while they are in.

Oh and ban the wearing of crested blazers and badly shaped berets in all public places, except for remembrance/ commerative events and tell the sad old f*ckers to get a hobby ^~
 
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#11
Oh and ban the wearing of crested blazers and badly shaped berets in all public places, except for remembrance/ commerative events and tell the sad old f*ckers to get a hobby ^~
Good plan - but can we extend it to putting the self-styled “walthunters” in the stocks for public humiliation?
 
#12
There has been much discussion over the past year regarding Veteran's rights or lack of them. Where do you stand on this issue? Please choose all the options that you think we should be entitled to. I've maxed out the options but did have some others at the back of my mind too. As this is currently in the Int Cell please mind your Ps and Qs. QUICK EDIT - JUST TO CLARIFY, THESE OPTIONS DO NOT ECHO MY BELIEFS! :)
You are living in a dream world old son, once your service is over, its over, we are all considered disposable items. We volunteered, nobody forced us to take up arms, you take your chances, do your time, get your pension, and bore your grandchildren to death. Blair showed his contempt by issuing those tin lapel badges, big bloody deal! I'm a veteran, now retired, if I go to A&E why should I be pushed to the front of the queue, in front of a sick screaming kid, or a damaged woman. As for tax, you will pay tax until the day you die, my father, 91 fought in Burma and Malaya still pays tax. Fit healthy discharged servicemen should have the ability to find their own employment, the limbless need help, as do the mentally sick, that they get to a degree, . If this present government had our welfare at heart, there wouldn't be 100's of ex servicemen living on the streets. Dream on.
 
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#13
You are living in a dream world old son, once your service is over, its over, we are all considered disposable items. We volunteered, nobody forced us to take up arms, you take your chances, do your time, get your pension, and bore your grandchildren to death. Blair showed his contempt by issuing those tin lapel badges, big bloody deal! I'm a veteran, now retired, if I go to A&E why should I be pushed to the front of the queue, in front of a sick screaming kid, or a damaged woman. As for tax, you will pay tax until the day you die, my father, 91 fought in Burma and Malaya still pays tax. Fit healthy discharged servicemen should have the ability to find their own employment, the military have disciplined them to be self reliant. If this present government had our welfare at heart, there wouldn't be 100's of ex servicemen living on the streets. Dream on.
RTFQ. I didn't say they were my views. These are all items I've heard various Veterans 'demand' in the recent past. Personally I agree with @Nato Standard123 .
 
#14
Naturally, all service related injuries should get NHS priority.
If you return to the local area where you joined up and you were registered on the Council waiting list for accommodation your service should still count as waiting time, if you weren't registered then you take your chance like everyone else.
Wherever you are posted your children should get priority access to schools and also when you leave the service.
I believe service pensions (actually all public sector pensions) should be tax free.
After you've been out for a year you take your chances like everyone else.
 
#15
I clicked on the House thing because it was the closest I could get to what I’d like. I think guys who’ve served (regular) should be given some benefit for their service when applying for local authority housing, but not priority. They should be further up the pile than their civilian equivalent but I don’t think they should get a house before a single parent with 3 kids.
 
#17
As has already been said, service related injuries, should get priority treatment. But even that should come with the caveat, that it should still be subject to screening and prioritising.

A dodgy knee, caused by service, shouldn't trump another person's needs, just because you spent time in the military. It still needs to be weighed in the balance of need and if someone else has a greater need that's the way it goes

The type of catastrophic injuries we immediately think of when this issue is raised should obviously be priority cases. But that would be the expectation for anybody with those sorts of injury, ex services or not
 
#19
The practice of rewarding veterans is a very old one, and has both purpose and value. Even Roman legionnaires were set up with a house and land after their service and was one of the ways in which the Pax Romanica was implemented. Examples such as the Royal Hospital, Chelsea and the generosity of the Marquess of Granby are also examples where the welfare of ex servicemen has been provided in the past. Just because there is now a welfare state, the reason why such actions were taken in the past should not be forgotten.

Firstly, military service is not "just a job".. despite recent moves to "normalise" military service, it is not, and never has been directly comparable to civilian employment. The potential risk, social disruption and level of open ended commitment is nowhere comparable with any other career. Society asks a huge amount from its servicefolk and needs to acknowledge this debt, culturally as well ats legally and fiscally. I am making this point not on the basis of seeking selfish benefit, but in recognition of the need to ensure and retain this commitment to collective defence.

I suggest that we need to think about the issue in broadly three areas:

Remuneration and welfare support.. Service people need to be paid at a socially acceptable and attractive rate. I remember the days of soldiers on benefits. This should never happen. I don't really mind if the system is taxed or tax free, as long as what ends up in the pocket is roughly the same. As part of this deal, something needs to address three areas where the peripatetic service life throws up specific problems. These are housing, health and family employment.

Status and Reputation. Trained military individuals are a national asset, and should be seen as such. The country has invested in them and should take more care of them should they be needed in the future. There could be much more overt recognition of the character and abilities of ex-servicemen and much more effort to carry qualifications and employment over to civilian life. Equally it should be recognised that ex-servicemen are held to a higher sense of behaviour by the media..("ex squaddy pensioner convicted of theft shocker!"), however the media seldom sell the up side..! Do not dismiss the importance of symbols and badges.. they mean a lot to some people and their value in recognising sacrifice and selfless commitment should not be dismissed. They cost little, but gain immeasurable benefits for society.

Legal status and protection. This is a newish one, however there seems to be a growing trend in retrospective legislation, and this needs to be addressed. Ex-servicefolk need to be protected from and supported in defending legal attacks on actions taken in the line of duty. Whilst I am in no way condoning war crimes, the battlefield is never the same context as the High Street, even on a Saturday night.. To expose service individuals to political attack through civil and international courts long after the incidents have occurred is iniquitous. The abandonment of Crown Immunity was incredibly stupid, even by our craven politicians..

I know we as a body are pretty stiff lipped about "this sort of thing" and it is fashionable to downplay and decry any calls for "special pleading". I probably agree, but the Profession of Arms is, regrettably, still necessary, and needs to be properly funded and supported both in peace and war, as even the most cursory view of history will show..

I don't think this is necessarily about money and welfare, although regrettably this will always be an issue. It is probably much more about influencing public opinion, and challenging those who would denigrate the value and status of those who have served...
 
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#20
I think when people talk about veterans rights, it's in the back of a lot of peoples minds that American veterans seem to get special deals on things that UK veterans don't get. For example, they get free healthcare and either free or subsidised further education.

Of course, in the UK, we have the NHS which is free and student loans are actually a better deal than any other kind of loan although I think further education should be a free service.

Provided our wounded and disabled veterans get the healthcare and any other assistance they need as and when it's needed, I think everybody else should get on with it like everybody else has to.

Serving in the armed forces is both a unique job and a unique experience. It's not a ticket to easy street once you have stopped serving though. There is a lot of criticism of what I suppose you could describe as social security freeloaders. In some instances, people don't have a choice but in other instances, some people definitely are taking advantage of the system.

Why would we want to start characterising ex service men and women as being of the same ilk which is what would happen if we gave them free stuff for life. You can hear it now. You only joined because you wanted to get on the gravy train when you got out!

I served for a relatively short time. Six and a half years including boy service. During my relatively short service though, one of the things that the Army gave me was confidence to get on with it whatever "it" was. it's now a long time since I was in the Army. I left at the end of 1977.

During those years though, I have done reasonably ok. I own my own house. I have always either held down a job or earned money working for myself. I'm not wealthy but I can afford a pint whenever I want one and I can pay all my bills. I've raised my kids and I now have several grandchildren and everybody is happy and enjoys themselves. What more could I want?

The attitudes the Army instilled in me during my time in it have been largely responsible for me meeting the challenges that have come my way head on and I'm doing ok.

In my view, that's enough for me.
 

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