Veteran's Experiences in Civilian Employment

#1
Looking to conduct short phone interviews, around 15 minute in length with British Army veterans. The research aims to understand what benefits and barriers are created by time in service when moving into civilian employment.

The research so far has highlighted the lack of financial support and advice offered as well as difficulty adjusting to the new work environment. These issues are really important and there is a lack of knowledge in this area, so it would be great to get as many opinions as possible.

The website below provides much more detail into the work and directions on how to get involved. If you would like to help in this research, please take a look or get in touch via armyresearch@yahoo.com.

employment

The work is part of a 3rd year dissertation and is being supported by the University of York. Also in early discussions to share the research through charities and support agencies.

Please comment any advice or thoughts too, it has been really helpful to hear peoples opinions.

This post has been approved by Bad Co

Thank you
 

Roti

On ROPS
On ROPs
#2
Looking to conduct short phone interviews, around 15 minute in length with British Army veterans. The research aims to understand what benefits and barriers are created by time in service when moving into civilian employment.

The research so far has highlighted the lack of financial support and advice offered as well as difficulty adjusting to the new work environment. These issues are really important and there is a lack of knowledge in this area, so it would be great to get as many opinions as possible.

The website below provides much more detail into the work and directions on how to get involved. If you would like to help in this research, please take a look or get in touch via armyresearch@yahoo.com.

employment

The work is part of a 3rd year dissertation and is being supported by the University of York. Also in early discussions to share the research through charities and support agencies.

Please comment any advice or thoughts too, it has been really helpful to hear peoples opinions.

This post has been approved by Bad Co

Thank you
Biggest barrier is lack of adequate and timely planning by Service Leavers; unrealistic expectations by some that the Army will sort everything out for them; lack of participation by by many in terms of education, training and resettlement opportunities offered to them; and an expectation by many that the State will furnish them with social housing as a right.
 

napier

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
#3
Research into this area is important and participation from former service personnel would be very helpful. Please support Resarrase in his dissertation, thanks.
 
#4
Always happy to help someone doing this sort of thing, but can it be assumed that my experience, and that of my peers who left the Forces a couple of decades ago, would be irrelevant? Are you only needing input from recent times?
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#5
Like WB I left in the 80's not sure how relevant my experience would be, but PM if you feel it would
 
#6
Like WB I left in the 80's not sure how relevant my experience would be, but PM if you feel it would
Likewise. I left in the late 70's (self inflicted flounce!), then the naughties and now back in on FTRS, but have some experience of the transition, so happy to share my thoughts with the OP if relevant.
 
#7
In response to Whiskybreath's question, we haven't put a limit on the time since leaving the forces currently. Many of the issues highlighted so far would be the same in the past.

It's definitely useful to get an idea of whether the support that is provided has improved too.

Thanks to those who gave offered to help so far. I will PM you with more details
 
#8
Does it have to be from veterans themselves, or can impressions be given by a spouse? A relative left a few years ago, and has since died. His widow may be willing to contribute if shown this thread
 
#9
In response to Whiskybreath's question, we haven't put a limit on the time since leaving the forces currently. Many of the issues highlighted so far would be the same in the past.

It's definitely useful to get an idea of whether the support that is provided has improved too.

Thanks to those who gave offered to help so far. I will PM you with more details
I disagree with this approach. If your study is to have value it should reflect the changing paradigm within and without the organisation. Even split into 5 or 10 year blocks as a control. Trying to lump 30-40 years of response into a single survey the results would be open to challenge. Surprised an academic institution has agreed such a broad scope.
 
#10
Does it have to be from veterans themselves, or can impressions be given by a spouse? A relative left a few years ago, and has since died. His widow may be willing to contribute if shown this thread
The research can only be with Veterans directly sorry. Thank you for the offer though. In future I hope there is more research from the spouses perspective as many of the participants have highlighted the ffects of service and transitions on their partners
 
#11
Biggest barrier is lack of adequate and timely planning by Service Leavers; unrealistic expectations by some that the Army will sort everything out for them; lack of participation by by many in terms of education, training and resettlement opportunities offered to them; and an expectation by many that the State will furnish them with social housing as a right.
I left in 2007. Have to agree, I was looking for after Army jobs as far back as 19 years before I was due to leave. Really started applying for jobs about 6 years out. Got a few interviews about 5 years before I had to retire.

The amount of stress on taking tests and giving interviews as well as doing PowerPoint presentation I had to do for the first few was difficult.

After the third or fourth, calm as custard. Pre planning and knowing the company, its history and where they wanted to go . Even a small thing , for the PP show one company had a laser pointer , during the PP show , picked it up and started pointing. One of the board, must have known . Said " sorry the pointer is broken"
No problem, I have one here in my pocket...

Got that job. PPPPPP

Also remember others stating , won' t work unless it's a 25,000 wage and I willl be getting a council house. Wonder where they are now?
 
#12
I disagree with this approach. If your study is to have value it should reflect the changing paradigm within and without the organisation. Even split into 5 or 10 year blocks as a control. Trying to lump 30-40 years of response into a single survey the results would be open to challenge. Surprised an academic institution has agreed such a broad scope.
Very reasonable concern. It was something we discussed at length. Due to it being in depth qualitative interviews though, we believe it to be beneficial to hear as many views as possible. Additionally, during analysis I will able to separate interviews by leaving date and ensure this is used properly in line with the concerns you had.
 

Rod924

LE
Kit Reviewer
#13
I think the main problem is two fold in finding employment:

1. The ability of the civilian employer understanding a Military career CV and the ability to ascertain not just transferrable hard skills, but personal skills; to the service leaver, as an example, teamwork is an utter given but oddly, not to a civvy!

2. The biggest obstacle, IMHO, is the number of vacancies (or NOT as they often are) that are outsourced through agencies. Having worked in this sector, my opinion then, mid 90's, to now, has been consistent: Recruitment Consultants are not HR, they are Sales. They are afraid to waste time, or face, in understanding things they (obviously (there are a shit load of industries out there)) do not understand; they simply do not want to appear like they don't know their onions. They are afraid to say 'what do you mean by that?' or 'I'm sorry, I don't know what you mean, please can you break that down for me'?

As examples: Having been self employed for long periods, I find it incomprehensible that a consultant does not know that T/a means 'Trading As'. Believe it or not, when I first got into the sector I was trained (well they tried) to ignore self employed people due to: If they are looking for an employed position, they're obviously a failure. Utter bollards in my opinion.

I fully accept that I have a lower that low opinion of Recruiters. Even today, I got a call from a consultant to discuss my career and aspirations. My CV is pretty obvious, if one (would) read it, but the focus is purely on the last 5 years of employment: like for like, apples for apples; can I place this person and get a fee?

I was asked what I was now looking for and I explained a role within an office environment or even account manager that would use my core skills. OK they said, but you appear to have been doing a manual role (My current role,since 2010, which takes up a massive 5 lines, of the 3 pages). I countered, exasperated I admit, that you are simply looking at the last 5 years. They were obviously a wee bit miffed and said did I want their help! OK, please advise. Advice re my CV given. Check. So, any other questions I was asked. Yes, is your company looking for a consultant in x part of the country? Erm, well I don't know, do you have any business development experience? I replied 'Pardon! I was previously 16 years in Recruitment, running my own business for 12 of those of whom I got contracts with a number of large company's as detailed on the CV'. I never had the heart to say that this proves what I said 10 minutes ago re the last 5 years only to which you took exception.
 
#14
I think the main problem is two fold in finding employment:

1. , teamwork is an utter given but oddly, not to a civvy!
That is utter B/S, we had/still have many ex-forces Teamwork seems to mean get someone else to do your work. mention the fact the Forces all about Teamwork and the whining is embarrassing!
Ex forces is NOT a qualification!
 

Rod924

LE
Kit Reviewer
#15
That is utter B/S, we had/still have many ex-forces Teamwork seems to mean get someone else to do your work. mention the fact the Forces all about Teamwork and the whining is embarrassing!
Ex forces is NOT a qualification!
From what experience?
 
#16
I've hired a few ex-services.....some were successful, some not. Came down to the individual character rather than their military related CV.

When I left it was a case of "the main gate is that way".......
 
#17
From what experience?
Not my experience in Customs. A current topic on the FB group ( I know, I know) is " What was the best thing about working in Customs pre merger ?". It's proving to be rather popular, and at a rough guess, about 80% of the responses are of the teamwork/cameraderie/getting the job done/work hard and play hard/banter/pissups type.
No wonder ex Forces managed to slot in so well.
One guy hit it on the head when he said that although a small Department, it was known as the family Department, as virtually no matter where you went, you'd meet someone who'd know a mate or a colleague, and besides, we all had something in common.
There were of course some utter twats too...that thread doesn't pull any punches either!
 
#18
Biggest barrier is lack of adequate and timely planning by Service Leavers; unrealistic expectations by some that the Army will sort everything out for them; lack of participation by by many in terms of education, training and resettlement opportunities offered to them; and an expectation by many that the State will furnish them with social housing as a right.
When did you leave just after Major Sharpe?
 

Rod924

LE
Kit Reviewer
#19
I've hired a few ex-services.....some were successful, some not. Came down to the individual character rather than their military related CV.

When I left it was a case of "the main gate is that way".......
So not quite the 'dinner plate thrown off the table' B/S as you initially opined? My point being, the simple ethos of the Regular Army (fook the other lot (Services) which I would not btw)) is simply teamwork, drilled home in basic. Whilst I don't deny there are slackers, Jack cuants, idlers, biff chits and mingers, in the round, it's a bone question, or do you disagree with that?

Personally, in my experience, interviewing soundly can find out this trait, though not always. As I have stated, there are bad apples, bluffers in ALL walks of life, but I personally WOULD take teamwork as a given; teamwork to the extreme especially if evidence is shown of operational theatres.

Perhaps relevant to the thread is for CV's to elaborate on teamwork?
 

Rod924

LE
Kit Reviewer
#20
Not my experience in Customs. A current topic on the FB group ( I know, I know) is " What was the best thing about working in Customs pre merger ?". It's proving to be rather popular, and at a rough guess, about 80% of the responses are of the teamwork/cameraderie/getting the job done/work hard and play hard/banter/pissups type.
No wonder ex Forces managed to slot in so well.
One guy hit it on the head when he said that although a small Department, it was known as the family Department, as virtually no matter where you went, you'd meet someone who'd know a mate or a colleague, and besides, we all had something in common.
There were of course some utter twats too...that thread doesn't pull any punches either!
Totally agree: any vacancies?
 

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