Very Old and Very Bold

Just come across this picture elsewhere on the tinternet, caption is 1951 the oldest serving soldier in British Army over 40 years served Pte Arthur 'Nick' Carter KSLI, served Boer War and WW1 active service. Like the General speaking to him Kitchener look alike? Button undone bottom left pocked - was he picked up by man with stick?


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Auld-Yin

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Just come across this picture elsewhere on the tinternet, caption is 1951 the oldest serving soldier in British Army over 40 years served Pte Arthur 'Nick' Carter KSLI, served Boer War and WW1 active service. Like the General speaking to him Kitchener look alike? Button undone bottom left pocked - was he picked up by man with stick?


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Just well he was not promoted - no room for rank! :)

BTW, this chap has been discussed previously, albeit some years ago.

ETA: The officer accompanying the General also has the bottom pocket button undone - regimental tradition? :)
 
Just well he was not promoted - no room for rank! :)

BTW, this chap has been discussed previously, albeit some years ago.

ETA: The officer accompanying the General also has the bottom pocket button undone - regimental tradition? :)
Good spot on the other Officer and button, RAF BofB pilots had tradition to have top button of tunic undone. Obviously he could not be appointed CSgt Drum Major !
 
Dit alert! Found this account of Warrant Officer (WO2) Bill Griffiths encounter with Private Arthur (Nick) Carter, then QM.

On arrival at the Quartermaster's store, I was surprised to see what I considered to be quite an old chap behind the counter. He had lots of stripes upside down on one sleeve, and I was told that these were known as service stripes, and represented numbers of years service, and this chap I was told was one of the oldest serving private soldiers in the British Army. Nick Carter was his name, but here was another chap who had to be called ‘Sir’ out of respect for his age and experience.

He proceeded to throw equipment and clothing onto the counter, which I was told to stuff quickly into the kit bag, which was the first item given to me. The old boy kept muttering about how small I was and ‘how was he supposed to kit out midgets, from the kit available to him’ . But he continued to find stuff from all corners of the store, and kept on throwing it onto the counter, and I kept stuffing it into my kit bag. I thought, how the hell am I going to carry all this lot? and he hadn’t finished yet. He had got to the stage of finding a uniform for me. He looked puzzled. "We don’t have battledress to fit midgets" he said. "How tall are you"? "Four foot ten" I replied. I gathered from his conversation with another chap in the store that there was nothing anywhere near my size, and that I would have to be taken to the regimental tailor who would have to conjure up something for me. In a funny sort of way, I felt quite pleased with myself, here I was, not even one whole day in the army, and it seemed as though I was one up on their system, but to be fair, I suppose I was extra small, and I recalled how my choirmaster Sir Percy Hull, had always called me midget!!

Link to source:

Long Service & Good Conduct?

Chapter One


The inside story of (WO2) Bill Griffiths begins on a fateful day in May 1946 when the MP on the gates of the KSLI Guard Room at Copthorne Barracks Shrewsbury, demands recognition as "Sir" and tests the responses of this giant of a man who, while small in stature and still growing, will begin a Military adventure spanning almost 4 decades until his discharge in 1984. Any former soldier of the post WW2 era will relate to this humorous tale of mischief, devilment and typical Army conduct and challenge.

billgriffiths838
 
Pic dated 1951 and both men in BD wear the 1937/40 Pattern, not the 1949 Pattern. I wonder if they were TA ?

General Grover is wearing KSLI SD, as he was Colonel of the regiment in 1951, having retired from the regular army in 1948.

Colonel Shaw-Ball went on to command 1KSLI in Korea.
 
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Re the Earl of Powis, mentioned above.

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From Wiki:

George Charles Herbert, 4th Earl of Powis DL JP (24 June 1862 – 9 November 1952), known as George Herbert until 1891, was a British peer.

He was appointed Lord Lieutenant of Shropshire in 1896,[5] a post he held until 1951.[6] He was also a Deputy Lieutenant for the county of Montgomeryshire and JP for the counties of Montgomeryshire and Shropshire, and Alderman of Shropshire County Council. He was Bailiff Grand Cross of the Order of St John of Jerusalem.[7]

In 1897 he served as treasurer of the Salop Infirmary in Shrewsbury.[8] In 1898 he was made Honorary Colonel of the 4th (Militia) Battalion of the South Wales Borderers.[9]

Here he is in 1939:
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By Geoff Charles - Royal Welch Fusiliers parade at Newtown, CC0, File:Royal Welch Fusiliers parade at Newtown (4345644805).jpg - Wikimedia Commons

I notice that his year of birth is given as 1862 in the main and 1864 in the Personal Details table in the the right hand column. In any case it seems he died in 1952, the year after he left office.
George Herbert, 4th Earl of Powis - Wikipedia
 
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"He proceeded to throw equipment and clothing onto the counter, which I was told to stuff quickly into the kit bag, which was the first item given to me. The old boy kept muttering about how small I was and ‘how was he supposed to kit out midgets, from the kit available to him’ . But he continued to find stuff from all corners of the store, and kept on throwing it onto the counter, and I kept stuffing it into my kit bag. I thought, how the hell am I going to carry all this lot? and he hadn’t finished yet. He had got to the stage of finding a uniform for me. He looked puzzled. "We don’t have battledress to fit midgets" he said. "How tall are you"? "Four foot ten" I replied. I gathered from his conversation with another chap in the store that there was nothing anywhere near my size, and that I would have to be taken to the regimental tailor who would have to conjure up something for me"

Sounds very like the fellow who kitted me out at Buller Barracks, Aldershot, in 1970, if you substitute 'normal' for 'midget' or small'. His response to my questions on size was a gentlemanly 'ferck orf'.

Still, the tin hat and spider fitted.
 
Just come across this picture elsewhere on the tinternet, caption is 1951 the oldest serving soldier in British Army over 40 years served Pte Arthur 'Nick' Carter KSLI, served Boer War and WW1 active service. Like the General speaking to him Kitchener look alike? Button undone bottom left pocked - was he picked up by man with stick?


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Presumably he's being briefed on the provisions of an RSM's pension.
 

goodoldboy

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Just come across this picture elsewhere on the tinternet, caption is 1951 the oldest serving soldier in British Army over 40 years served Pte Arthur 'Nick' Carter KSLI, served Boer War and WW1 active service. Like the General speaking to him Kitchener look alike? Button undone bottom left pocked - was he picked up by man with stick?


View attachment 666333
Interesting story about Pvt Carter. He must have been in his mid-sixties when that photograph was taken, do we know when he was born?
 
Interesting story about Pvt Carter. He must have been in his mid-sixties when that photograph was taken, do we know when he was born?
I don't do facebook but if you do perhaps you can find more info at the link below. For anyone seeing nothing below this line, I've posted a link to a facebook page, which may not be visible.

ETA - if Pte Carter had been in the first Boer War he would have been at least 85 in 1951 and probably born before 1866. If it was the second Boer War he was in he would most likely have been born before 1888, so he would have been at least 63. I'm basing this on the possibility of a lad joining up a couple of years younger than his claimed age, as was known to happen, though not necessarily in this case, as late as the last year of the war.
 
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Update on Pve Arthur "Nick" Carter.

ARMY TRIBUTE FOR AN OLD COMRADE SHREWSBURY.— Last Post was sounded for the last time for ex-Private Arthur ( Nick ) Carter, aged 71, by a King's Shropshire Light Infantry bugler at a semi-military funeral here yesterday. Nick enlisted ...
Published: Thursday 11 November 1954
Newspaper: Birmingham Daily Gazette
County: Warwickshire, England
Type: Article | Words: 510 | Page: 7 | Tags: none

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