Venezuelan F-16s to Iran?

#1
http://www.regnum.ru/english/641129.html

Venezuela does not plan to sell US F16 to Iran or any other state, Venezuelan Defense Minister Orlando Maniglia has announced. He made the statement after a spokesman for the Venezuelan Joint Staff announced a possible deal with Tehran. The US State Department reacted to it immediately, noting that without US approval reselling of the fighters to a third country would be unlawful, reports Radio Liberty.

As REGNUM earlier reported, spokesman for Joint Staff of Venezuelan Armed Forces, Gen. Alberto Muller announced that Venezuela wanted to replace US F16 fighters by Russian Su35.
Sometimes denials mean that exactly this step would be done. And what if Venezuela would ingnore American prohibitions? Maybe Venezuela would be invaded or oil embargo would be imposed?
 
#2
Good luck getting spares. Those airframes are around 25 years old.
 
#3
KGB_resident said:
http://www.regnum.ru/english/641129.html

Venezuela does not plan to sell US F16 to Iran or any other state, Venezuelan Defense Minister Orlando Maniglia has announced. He made the statement after a spokesman for the Venezuelan Joint Staff announced a possible deal with Tehran. The US State Department reacted to it immediately, noting that without US approval reselling of the fighters to a third country would be unlawful, reports Radio Liberty.

As REGNUM earlier reported, spokesman for Joint Staff of Venezuelan Armed Forces, Gen. Alberto Muller announced that Venezuela wanted to replace US F16 fighters by Russian Su35.
Sometimes denials mean that exactly this step would be done. And what if Venezuela would ingnore American prohibitions? Maybe Venezuela would be invaded or oil embargo would be imposed?
Could it be another attempt to get the yanks goat?

Or just anoother attempt by the 'underdog' to snub their nose at the evil empire?
 
#5
For all the challenge they would present to an F22, they may as well be flying Sopwith Camels.
 
#6
like all other types of military action its not the machine but the man, well until everyone is using rov's. fall all their faults i'm sure the usaf could deal with iran if they were using the f22 and the spams the sopwith camels.
 
#7
bleep323 said:
like all other types of military action its not the machine but the man, well until everyone is using rov's. fall all their faults i'm sure the usaf could deal with iran if they were using the f22 and the spams the sopwith camels.
A slightly confusing post bleep, I assume you mean that if the tables were turned and the Iranians had the F22, they would have the upper hand. You are of course correct. Similiarly, if Iran had the Deathstar and a battalion of Chuck Norris clones, they would kick Uncle Sams butt. Thankfully, they havent, so they cant. :roll:
 
#8
If they want to sell them, let them sell them. After all, didn't they pay for them. Irrelevant how they paid for them.... that doesn't come into the equation!

So, if Iran wants F16 fighters they can park them alongside their F14s!
 
#9
me n bee said:
If they want to sell them, let them sell them. After all, didn't they pay for them. Irrelevant how they paid for them.... that doesn't come into the equation!

So, if Iran wants F16 fighters they can park them alongside their F14s!
It is relevant when they signed a contract (which is backed up by international law) promising that they would not sell them onto a 3rd party :D
 
#11
Agent_Smith said:
me n bee said:
If they want to sell them, let them sell them. After all, didn't they pay for them. Irrelevant how they paid for them.... that doesn't come into the equation!

So, if Iran wants F16 fighters they can park them alongside their F14s!
It is relevant when they signed a contract (which is backed up by international law) promising that they would not sell them onto a 3rd party :D
Since when do the spams give a toss about international law? 8O
 
#12
So , between Venezuela and Bandar Abbas is an awful lot of sea. I can't see the cargo not being intercepted on route, and isn't Iran still under embargo as regards Arms sales anyway?
 
#13
PartTimePongo said:
So , between Venezuela and Bandar Abbas is an awful lot of sea. I can't see the cargo not being intercepted on route, and isn't Iran still under embargo as regards Arms sales anyway?
PTP!

What would our American friends do if the cargo would be under

1. Liberian flag
2. Russian flag
3. Russian naval flag.
 
#14
KGB_resident said:
PartTimePongo said:
So , between Venezuela and Bandar Abbas is an awful lot of sea. I can't see the cargo not being intercepted on route, and isn't Iran still under embargo as regards Arms sales anyway?
PTP!

What would our American friends do if the cargo would be under

1. Liberian flag
2. Russian flag
3. Russian naval flag.
As long as they had a suspiscion that the ship was carrying restricted weapons to Iran, i'm 99% sure they would blockade the ship regardless of which flag it flew. Watch out sergey, better avoid any long 'pleasure-trips' to the arabian gulf in the near future :D
 
#15
KGB_resident said:
PartTimePongo said:
So , between Venezuela and Bandar Abbas is an awful lot of sea. I can't see the cargo not being intercepted on route, and isn't Iran still under embargo as regards Arms sales anyway?
PTP!

What would our American friends do if the cargo would be under

1. Liberian flag
2. Russian flag
3. Russian naval flag.
For a small consideration, our friends in the French secret service would sink it in the port of embarkation. :D
 
#16
sandmanfez said:
KGB_resident said:
PartTimePongo said:
So , between Venezuela and Bandar Abbas is an awful lot of sea. I can't see the cargo not being intercepted on route, and isn't Iran still under embargo as regards Arms sales anyway?
PTP!

What would our American friends do if the cargo would be under

1. Liberian flag
2. Russian flag
3. Russian naval flag.
For a small consideration, our friends in the French secret service would sink it in the port of embarkation. :D
Frankly speaking unlikely Iranins would buy these old, rusty, useless F-16s (moreover without spare parts).
 
#17
Agent_Smith said:
Watch out sergey, better avoid any long 'pleasure-trips' to the arabian gulf in the near future :D
Thanks for the warning mr.Smith!
 
#20
I think this was the desired text:
[url=http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/4990302.stm]BBC News[/url] said:
Venezuela 'may swap oil currency'
Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez
President Chavez has big plans for Venezuela's oil industry
Venezuela has hinted it could price its oil exports in euros rather than US dollars, further weakening its links to the US.

President Hugo Chavez said he was considering taking the step following a similar declaration by Iran.

Earlier this month, Iranian authorities gave backing for the launch of an oil exchange that traded solely in euros.

Some reports have suggested Iran's move may be part of a bid to undermine the importance of the dollar.

But in an interview with Channel 4 News in London, Mr Chavez said the move was merely a matter of choice.

"I think the European Union has made a large contribution with the euro," he said.

"So what the president of Iran says ... is recognising the power of Europe - they have succeeded in integrating and have a single currency competing with the dollar, and Venezuela might also consider that - we are free to do that," he added.

Dollar concerns

Experts have suggested that, should Iran demand payment for its exports in euros, central banks could opt to convert some of their dollar reserves to euros and therefore possibly trigger a further decline in the US currency.

The dollar has already come under pressure in foreign exchange markets in recent weeks, triggering nervousness in world stock markets.

Central banks, especially in Asia, who hold large amounts of the US dollar, could find the value of their foreign currency reserves substantially reduced.

Tensions rising

Iran is currently embroiled in a stand-off with the US in a row over its nuclear ambitions.

Iran, the second-largest exporter in oil producing nations group Opec, insists merely wants to build power stations, but the US claims it is building nuclear arms.

Meanwhile, Venezuela - the world's fifth largest oil producer - has been trying to reduce its dependence on the US, as relations have been strained under President Hugo Chavez.

In April it signed a joint venture with Cuba - a long time opponent of the US - to revamp an oil refinery and supply unrefined oil to the country.
 

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