Venezuela - coup d'état?

Bachelet on the other hand seems to be getting the red carpet treatment. This may possibly be because she seems to have some serious credentials in South America, having spent time in prison in Chile under the military dictatorship there.
Michelle Bachelet is one of the most respected politicians in Latin America. She was a president of Chile 2 terms 2006-10 and 2014-18. Previously she was Health minister, minister of Defence and is a physician with studies in military strategy.
She is an ideal figure as a mediator to resolve the crisis in Venezuela.
 
Guaido's attempt to overthrow Maduro seems to be running out of steam, as the US gradually loses interest. www.cbc.ca/news/world/venezuela-corruption-guiado-maduro-coup-abrams-1.5191288?cmp=rss
A bid by opposition lawmakers to oust Nicolas Maduro as Venezuela's president has sputtered amid a corruption scandal, a lack of support from the oil-rich country's powerful military and what appears to be reduced interest from Washington.
It appears at this point that Maduro will be around for a while yet.
"It's sort of a stalemate at this point," said Timothy Gill, a sociology professor at the University of North Carolina who studies Venezuela. "There is a sense Maduro is going to stick around longer than many might have expected."
The US has lost interest in Venezuela and have turned their attentions to China and Iran instead.
U.S. President Donald Trump has reportedly lost interest in Venezuela, according to sources cited by the Washington Post.
He is said to have believed toppling Maduro would be an easy foreign policy win and has virtually ceased mentioning the country on Twitter or in speeches, as military tensions with Iran mount and trade battles with China fester.
Talks between the government of Venezuela and Guaido's supporters have been taking place, with another round coming next week in Barbados.
Talks between the government and Guaido's team took place in Norway last month. Another round of negotiations aimed at breaking the political standoff is slated to start next week, likely in Barbados, according to sources cited by The Associated Press on Saturday.
At the moment though, Guaido's biggest concern is corruption within the ranks of his supporters. He is currently facing a scandal relating to money which was intended to be spent on defecting Venezuelan soldiers in Colombia instead being stolen by people working for Guaido.
Reports and denials of the U.S. losing interest in the situation come as Guiado's team grapples with a corruption investigation.

Earlier this month, anti-Maduro news outlet the PanAm Post reported that tens of thousands of dollars earmarked for defecting Venezuelan soldiers in Colombia were stolen by Guaido's emissaries in the country. The money was allegedly spent at fancy nightclubs and high-end hotels.
Colombian prosecutors are investigating.
Guaido has launched an investigation, as have Colombian prosecutors.
As Guaido and his supporters have constantly been using accusations of corruption against the Maduro government, having his own people apparently being implicated in corruption as well will hurt the oppositions reputation.
Guaido and opponents of Maduro have consistently rallied against government corruption as a cause of the country's suffering. Having his allies implicated in a scandal — especially one involving money destined for military defectors, a key plank of the opposition's broader plan to take power — is particularly troublesome.
A polling firm with connections to the opposition has found that 36 per cent of Venezuelans support Guaido, while more than 40 percent support Maduro.
In a poll conducted earlier this month, Datincorp, a firm with links to the opposition, found 36 per cent of Venezuelans recognized Guaido as the head of state, down from 49 per cent in February. More than 40 per cent recognized Maduro as president.
If Guaido is going to succeed, it will have to be within the next six months as he is basing his claim to the presidency on a legal provision that results in his claim expiring at the end of the year.
"If Guaido is going to be successful, it will have to be in the next six months," said James Roberts of the Heritage Foundation. "Legally, his interim presidency ends at the end of the year."
 
The government of Venezuela have arrived in Barbados for talks with the opposition, mediated by Norway.
www.cbc.ca/news/world/venezuela-government-opposition-talks-barbados-1.5212669?cmp=rss
Jorge Rodriguez said on Twitter that he and the rest of the government's delegation have arrived for negotiations in the Caribbean nation of Barbados, where several days of talks were also held last week.

Rodriguez was flanked by representatives including foreign minister Jorge Arreaza and Miranda state Gov. Hector Rodriguez in the video message. Chief opposition negotiator Stalin Gonzalez earlier confirmed that his delegation was returning to Barbados for talks mediated by Norway.
Not a lot seems to be happening so far.
 
There's been another major blackout in Venezuela on Monday.
www.cbc.ca/news/world/venezuela-blackout-1.5221067?cmp=rss
There's not a lot of information at this time as to the cause or how long it will be down. The government said something about an "electromagnetic attack" on a hydroelectric dam, but that explanation doesn't tell us much.
Sounds like they are preparing to issue a story that Donald Trump personally hacked into the utility's SCADA system.
 
Sounds like they are preparing to issue a story that Donald Trump personally hacked into the utility's SCADA system.
It sounds like someone had to answer a question in a press conference about what happened and he came out with the first thing that popped into his head whether it made sense or not.
 
Venezuela SU-30 Flanker Aggressively Shadows a U.S. EP-3 Aircraft
Video of Venezuela SU-30 Flanker as it “aggressively shadowed” a U.S. EP-3 Aries II at an unsafe distance in international airspace over the Caribbean Sea July 19, jeopardizing the crew and aircraft. The EP-3 aircraft, flying a mission in approved international airspace was approached in an unprofessional manner by the SU-30 that took off from an airfield 200 miles east of Caracas. The U.S. routinely conducts multi-nationally recognized and approved detection and monitoring missions in the region to ensure the safety and security of our citizens and those of our partners.
 

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