Venezuela - coup d'état?

Grey Fox

*Russian Troll*
Seriously? Has Russia admitted any CivCas in Syria yet? Or is it still “no civilian casualties”? Millions displaced, hundreds of thousands dead and yet no CivCas admitted let alone investigated by ‘Putin’s agitprop’
Syrian war was started by Westies. All casualities are on them.
 

Grey Fox

*Russian Troll*
The Venezuelan people I meet on a daily basis are exactly the same as everyone else in LatAm. Working hard for low wages, exploited by bosses whose only objective is profit.
Yes, Venezuelan people are exactly the same, as everyone else in LatAm (may be, exept Cuba). But "working hard" and "only objective is profit", is, obviously, joke. Not in the European or Asiatic meaning of this words
 
Really? Your 'assault' on Aleppo left no CivCas? Not one? How ridiculous are you?
I believe it is not right place to discuss Syria and other issues not related to Venezuela.
 
Does anyone here know anything about Venezuela prior to these current problems? I've heard it's got the highest murder rate in the world outside of war zones. Can it extract itself from this decline?
Yes, crime level in Venezuela was and remain very high.
Crime in Venezuela - Wikipedia
The United Nations has attributed crime to the poor political and economic environment in the country,[1][2] which has the second highest murder rate in the world.
It should be said that murder rates are very high in Latin America and namely Latin American countries are 'leaders' in respect to murder rates.
List of countries by intentional homicide rate - Wikipedia
According to this source the countries and territories with highest murder rates are
intentional homicide victims per 100,000 inhabitants
El Salvador 82.84
Honduras 56.52
Venezuela 56.33
US Vergin Island 49.26
Jamaica 47.01
Lesoto 41.25
Belize 37.60
Note, that even on territories that enjoy US/UK rule and democracy (Virgin Islands, Belize) murder rate could be very high.
 
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Does anyone here know anything about Venezuela prior to these current problems? I've heard it's got the highest murder rate in the world outside of war zones. Can it extract itself from this decline?
In reality only if Maduro (and more specifically Putin, as he’s loaned $80bn to Maduro’s ‘govt’) allow the free elections that the constitution demands in these circumstances. And the chances of that are.....
 
Yes, crime level in Venezuela was and remain very high.
Crime in Venezuela - Wikipedia

It should be said that murder rates are very high in Latin America and namely Latin American countries are 'leaders' in respect to murder rates.
List of countries by intentional homicide rate - Wikipedia
According to this source the countries and territories with highest murder rates are
intentional homicide victims per 100,000 inhabitants
El Salvador 82.84
Honduras 56.52
Venezuela 56.33
US Vergin Island 49.26
Jamaica 47.01
Lesoto 41.25
Belize 37.60
Note, that even on territories that enjoy US/UK rule and democracy (Virgin Islands, Belize) murder rate could be very high.
Belize isn't under UK rule.
 
Yes, crime level in Venezuela was and remain very high.
Crime in Venezuela - Wikipedia

It should be said that murder rates are very high in Latin America and namely Latin American countries are 'leaders' in respect to murder rates.
List of countries by intentional homicide rate - Wikipedia
According to this source the countries and territories with highest murder rates are
intentional homicide victims per 100,000 inhabitants
El Salvador 82.84
Honduras 56.52
Venezuela 56.33
US Vergin Island 49.26
Jamaica 47.01
Lesoto 41.25
Belize 37.60
Note, that even on territories that enjoy US/UK rule and democracy (Virgin Islands, Belize) murder rate could be very high.
I believe the Wiki article is based on the UNODC report of 2016? There are other sources and no doubt some will dismiss OVV statistics:
InSight Crime's 2018 Homicide Round-Up


Venezuela has not given up its status as the Latin American country with the highest homicide rate, at 81.4 homicides per 100,000 people, or 23,047 murders. While this number is slightly down from the 26,616 murders reported in 2017, the country remains wracked by severe political, economic, and social conflicts.

A report from the Venezuelan Violence Observatory (Observatorio Venezolano de Violencia – OVV), the only public source of homicides in the country, put the murder rate at 81.4 in 2018, down from 89 in 2017.
There’s also the allegations that security forces are not recording those ‘resisting authority’ or have the bad luck to be caught by ‘stray’ rounds of ammo:
Venezuela Police Hide Killings Behind Claims of Resisting Authority

To be fair, the whole region of north and north eastern Latin America appears to have many problems. But for a nation of such massive potential wealth like Venezuela, it appears to have a failing strategy.
 
Yes, Venezuelan people are exactly the same, as everyone else in LatAm (may be, exept Cuba). But "working hard" and "only objective is profit", is, obviously, joke. Not in the European or Asiatic meaning of this words
Outside of Venezuela, yes, working hard. Perhaps you missed the part where I touched on the lack of a state social service? If you don’t work, you don’t have money, with no money you starve. People die of hunger in Latin America; Shock!

The Vz girl who served my friends and I last night works six, 10-12 hour shifts a week. She is paid about S/.1000. Which is approximately US$330, per month. I would count that as exploitation by her bosses.
 
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putins appranty sent troops in and told trump hands off
US warns Russia, others against sending troops to Venezuela
We strongly caution actors external to the Western Hemisphere against deploying military assets to Venezuela, or elsewhere in the Hemisphere, with the intent of establishing or expanding military operations," White House National Security Adviser John Bolton said in a statement.

Anything that gives John Bolton a headache is a good thing
 
putins appranty sent troops in and told trump hands off
US warns Russia, others against sending troops to Venezuela
We strongly caution actors external to the Western Hemisphere against deploying military assets to Venezuela, or elsewhere in the Hemisphere, with the intent of establishing or expanding military operations," White House National Security Adviser John Bolton said in a statement.

Anything that gives John Bolton a headache is a good thing
Really?
I'd suggest thinking that increased tensions is a good thing is pretty damn' stupid.
 
So America can't launch another adventure?
oh dear how sad never mind whatever happens in Venezuela US military intervention wouldn't help.
 
Netblocks.org provides a useful (if depressing) insight into the state of the Venezuelan power grid.

The good news today? A vast improvement.

Only 67% of the country is now offline.

As opposed to 91% a few days past and around 97% at one point

 

Grey Fox

*Russian Troll*
But Russian intervention does?

You're definitely one stop west of Upney.
If Eurasian states can make alliances with American states, so American states can make alliances with Eurasian one.
If Bolton (or any other Septic) dont want to see the Russian forces in Western hemisphere, he had to withdraw US forces from the Easern one.
 
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Steps are proceeding to strip Guaido of his immunity to prosecution so that he can be charged with various alleged crimes.
Venezuela's top judge moves to strip opposition leader Juan Guaido of immunity | CBC News
Venezuela's chief justice asked lawmakers Monday to strip opposition leader Juan Guaido of immunity, taking a step toward prosecuting him for alleged crimes as he seeks to oust President Nicolas Maduro.
These crimes include incitement to violence, receiving illicit funds from abroad, and ignoring a court order to remain in the country.
Supreme Court Justice Maikel Moreno said Guaido should be prosecuted for violating a Supreme Court ordered ban on his leaving the country when he went on a tour of Latin American nations that back a change in Venezuela's government.

The opposition leader, who has immunity from prosecution as head of the National Assembly, is also accused by Maduro's government of inciting violence linked to street protests and receiving illicit funds from abroad.
Guaido is continuing with his campaign to bring his supporters out onto the streets to demand the government resign.
"We must unite now more than ever," said Guaido, at a Caracas university earlier Monday. "We must mount the biggest demonstration so far to reject what's happening."
Heads have apparently rolled in cabinet over the electrical blackout fiasco, and rationing is being introduced to help mitigate blackouts.
Monday evening, Maduro said in a state televised address that he had replaced his electricity minister Luis Motta with electrical engineer Igor Gaviria.
The move came one day after Maduro said the nation's electricity is being rationed to combat daily blackouts.
The news story notes that since there aren't a lot of details it's hard to say how well the government's plans will be able to restore normal service.
With few details, it was difficult to assess how effective the plan would be in restoring a consistent supply of power in the long term. Some electricity experts have also said there are no quick fixes to Venezuela's fragile power grid, presenting the prospect that electricity could be shaky and unreliable for the foreseeable future.
Anti-government and pro-government groups clash in the streets. Some gunfire is reported.
On Sunday, a mass of protesters took to the streets only to be threatened by contingents of alleged government supporters known as "colectivos" who appeared on motorbikes and quickly dispersed them. Videos posted on social media also showed armed men opening fire to drive residents inside.
The Americans are manoeuvring to have a supporter of Guaido take Venezuela's seat in the Organization of American States (OAS), The OAS is a talking shop with little real relevance, but it would represent another diplomatic victory for Guaido.
Meanwhile, U.S. officials in Washington said Monday they will do "everything possible" so that Guaido's representative can fill Venezuela's seat in the Organization of American States (OAS), a body that promotes economic, military and cultural co-operation among its members.
U.S. Ambassador Carlos Trujillo was optimistic about the possibility that a resolution to authorize Gustavo Tarre access to the seat of Venezuela will meet the 18 required votes.
"We have many friends who are very interested in the Venezuela issue," Trujillo told reporters after a brief ceremony in which he assumed the rotating presidency of the OAS Permanent Council. "There are some who have not recognized Guaido but know that what happens in Venezuela is unacceptable."
Maduro like Chavez before him has few friends in Latin America, as he represents an overturning of the existing social order in much of Latin America, a region with major racial and class divides.
 
The G7 foreign ministers are meeting in France in preparation for a larger G7 meeting in a few months. www.cbc.ca/news/world/g7-france-1.5087656?cmp=rss
Amongst the issues discussed was Venezuela, where the US is trying to get more support for the overthrow of Maduro and his replacement by Guaido.
Deputy Secretary of State John J. Sullivan said that Washington will use the G7 forum to galvanize support in recognizing American-backed Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaido.
Most of the G7 support this stance to varying degrees. The odd man seems to be Italy, who have not yet agreed to back Guaido.
Washington seems to be at odds with Italy over its stance on the crisis-hit South American country as it is the sole G-7 state to not back Guaido.
 
The following is a very interesting story on the conditions the Canadian embassy in Caracas is working under. I will summarise a few of the interesting points, but I would very much recommend reading the article itself as it provides a good deal of background information on the situation there as well as showing the value of the work which embassies in general do.
www.cbc.ca/news/politics/venezuela-maduro-canada-embassy-1.5087483?cmp=rss

First to provide some context, here we see a typical scene in Venezuela. Anti-Maduro protesters armed with Molotov cocktails advance along a street in Caracas. The Canadian embassy is the building immediately behind them.


The US has pulled their embassy out of Venezuela, but Canada remains with no intention of leaving. Having people there on the ground who can talk to ordinary Venezuelans provides you with a degree of information on events and general public mood which you can't get any other way.
"I'm glad that Canada didn't do the same thing as the U.S. because you need people on the ground in places like Venezuela to get a sense of what the citizens are saying," said Ben Rowswell, the last person to serve as a full ambassador for Canada in Caracas. (...)

"The core function of diplomacy is listening and that's one thing our embassy excelled at. The embassy has probably had face-to-face conversations with tens of thousands of Venezuelans of every stripe over these past few years and that's one of the reasons we're so confident in our judgments of what Venezuelans really want."
If there is a reason that US foreign policy acts like the US are "blind and deaf", that's because they effectively are because they pull out of places such as Caracas.
"There's a reason that the U.S. sometimes acts in foreign policy like it's blind and deaf, and that's because it actually ends up removing its eyes and ears from the places that matter the most, like Caracas.
Canada and Venezuela have come to a tacit diplomatic understanding, whereby the Canadian embassy in Caracas continues to function despite being ordered to close, and the Venezuelan embassy and consulates in Canada continue to function despite the government not being recognised by Canada.
Canadian officials and their Venezuelan counterparts — both the ones who support current President Nicolás Maduro and those backing opposition leader Juan Guaidó — have described a strange diplomatic equilibrium that allows Canada's embassy to remain in Caracas despite government orders to leave, and also lets Maduro's government retain six diplomatic properties in Canada, despite the fact that Ottawa doesn't recognize it.
As an aside, this story mentions in passing something that was mentioned in a previous story. There are apparently large numbers of Colombians living in Venezuela.
Colombia also has lost the ability to help its citizens in Venezuela, where they are by far the largest group of foreign residents.
To go back to diplomacy, the Venezuelan government twice ordered Canada to retract its statements about not considering Maduro to be president, or face diplomatic relations being broken off. Canada ignored both deadlines, and the embassy in Caracas continues to function.
As well as surviving downgrades and expulsions, the Canadian embassy managed to ride out one ultimatum to close up shop by simply ignoring it.
On Jan. 9, the Venezuelan government gave Canada 72 hours to retract a statement saying that Maduro, whose presidential term had ended that day, was no longer a legitimate president. If Canada did not retract, Venezuela would break off relations.
Canada did nothing.
On the Saturday the deadline was to expire, Venezuela's foreign ministry announced that President Maduro had decided to extend the deadline for Canada (and fellow miscreant Paraguay) to the following Monday.
Again, Canada did nothing. The Monday came and went with no consequences.
Paraguay responded to the threat by closing its embassy and breaking off relations.
The recent former Canadian ambassador to Venezuela said that the Venezuelan government leaders are sometimes just performing for the cameras, with public statements condemning various countries not being connected to subsequent actions.
"(Members of the Maduro regime) are aware of how isolated they are," said Rowswell, "and they sometimes lash out in anger in ways that aren't entirely thought through. And they're sometimes performing for the cameras, and not engaged in real conversations. Often you'll see them making a threat on television without ever having communicated with the embassy.
"My experience was you never knew who they were going to pick on. You'd wake up one day and it would be the Italians, the next day it would be the Spanish, almost every day (it) would be the United States, and then regularly every single Latin American country would be singled out for abuse.
"It got to the point there was no observable pattern, just whoever Maduro was mad at from one day to the next."
Overall, I would recommend reading the complete news story to gain an appreciation for the function and importance of embassies and diplomats in these sorts of crises.
 

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