Venezuela - coup d'état?

The blackout continues. 'We need help': Anger mounts as Venezuela's worst-ever blackout enters day 4 | CBC News
"The food we had in our refrigerators has spoiled, businesses are closed, there's no communication, not even by cell phone," Ana Cerrato, 49, a merchant, standing in front of a pile of razor wire and debris.
"No country can bear 50 hours without electricity. We need help! We are in a humanitarian crisis!"
As I've mentioned previously I've been through a similar wide scale black-out in hot summer weather. It took about a week to fully restore electric power. I'm not sure of details of the situation in Venezuela, but in my experience the larger cites had their electric power restored later than most of the smaller towns, as they represented a larger incremental chunk of generating capacity and so had to wait until more of the system had been brought back up and stabilised.

It's amazing how much daily life depends on electricity and how quickly you can get bored when you can't use televisions, computers, or the Internet. When the sun goes down you can't even read a book. Trying to go anywhere in your car doesn't work out well, as all the traffic lights don't work and even with the best of discipline by drivers at intersections traffic soon slows to a crawl. The shops closed because their cash registers didn't work. Mostly though, people walked about in the cooler parts of the day and talked with their neighbours on the street, in some cases getting to know them for the first time.

I can imagine however that in the larger cities in Venezuela there will be lots of people with even more spare time on their hands than usual, few sources of entertainment, and given the existing political situation were spending their time being very upset with whomever they feel is to blame for the situation. Knocking out the electricity system is a remarkably effective means of disrupting modern society. We don't however have any information at this time as to the actual cause in this case.

In Venezuela, some people have taken to looting the shops. In at least some cases the shops were apparently looted by protesters.
A small supermarket in a working class area of western Caracas was looted on Saturday night after protesters barricaded an avenue and clashed with police, according to neighbours and the shop's owner Manuel Caldeira.
"They took food, they broke the display windows, they stole scales and point of sale terminals," said Caldeira, 58, standing on the shop floor littered with glass. "We weren't here (when it happened), we got here and found all of this destroyed."
The air in the shop still reeked of tear gas from the night before, when police had fired canisters to disperse the looters. Two employees were struggling to open protective steel doors that were damaged by the thieves.
 
It looks that restoration of Venezuelan electric power system will not happen soon. It is not clear what exactly have happened at Guri Hydro Power Plant but the situation complicated by explosion on critically important Power substation.
Marco Rubio Says Venezuelan Explosion Occurred At 'German Dam,' Who Is A Journalist And Not A Dam
A transformer exploded in the Sidor substation in Guayana, a city in the Venezuelan state of Bolívar.
But the journalist who reported about the explosion has 'misleading' name ... apparently.
That information was reported by a journalist by the name of Germán Dam, who Rubio seemed to think was an actual, literal dam.
Sen. Marco Rubio’s comments this weekend on widespread power outages in Venezuela came back to bite him after the “German Dam” he said exploded turned out to be the name of a journalist covering the issue.
“Today another transformer explosion at the German Dam in Bolivar State caused another massive blackout,”
Though it is just a funny mistake.
 
Yet another major electrical substation has exploded or burned, this time in Caracas. Explosion at Venezuela power station adds to tensions amid days-long blackout | CBC News
Witnesses say an explosion occurred at a power station in the Venezuelan capital as days of nationwide power cuts imposed increasing hardship on the country.
Flames rose from the electrical facility in the Baruta area of Caracas early Monday, contributing to a sense of chaos among Venezuelans already struggling with an economic crisis and a bitter political standoff.
Guaido says that 3 out of 4 power transformers were destroyed and are unrepairable.
Opposition leader Juan Guaido says three of four electricity transformers servicing the area were knocked out and that state engineers are unable to fix them.
Guaido claims the fires are proof of government mismanagement, while the government has accused Guaido of being involved in the sabotage of the national grid.
The U.S.-backed leader of the National Assembly has blamed the blackouts that began Thursday on alleged government corruption and mismanagement, while President Nicolas Maduro accused his adversary of sabotaging the national grid.
The army has now been deployed to guard the power system from saboteurs.
Meanwhile, Defence Minister Vladimir Padrino Lopez said the military has been deployed to protect Venezuela's power installations from alleged saboteurs.
The following is a photo of the burned substation in Caracas.

 
Yet another major electrical substation has exploded or burned, this time in Caracas. Explosion at Venezuela power station adds to tensions amid days-long blackout | CBC News


Guaido says that 3 out of 4 power transformers were destroyed and are unrepairable.


Guaido claims the fires are proof of government mismanagement, while the government has accused Guaido of being involved in the sabotage of the national grid.


The army has now been deployed to guard the power system from saboteurs.


The following is a photo of the burned substation in Caracas.

It sounds as if the distribution network is collapsing in sequence, as the remaining infrastructure has to take up the strain of trying to supply the electricity demands.
I would guess that there isn't much resilience left in the system by this point.
 
It sounds as if the distribution network is collapsing in sequence, as the remaining infrastructure has to take up the strain of trying to supply the electricity demands.
I would guess that there isn't much resilience left in the system by this point.
That's quite a lot of conclusion to draw out of two substation fires. The second one doesn't look particularly large either. I'll leave the analysis up to people actually working in the power system industry, but I wouldn't rule arson out of the picture either.
 
It looks that restoration of Venezuelan electric power system will not happen soon. It is not clear what exactly have happened at Guri Hydro Power Plant but the situation complicated by explosion on critically important Power substation.
Marco Rubio Says Venezuelan Explosion Occurred At 'German Dam,' Who Is A Journalist And Not A Dam

But the journalist who reported about the explosion has 'misleading' name ... apparently.


Though it is just a funny mistake.
Sidor is a major steel company in Venezuela, near the city of Ciudad Guyana. If the substation was associated with Sidor, then it may have been built to service one of their steel mills.

I believe that Sidor has been operating at low capacity for a few years now. The substation may have been running at low utilisation or even shut down, so it's hard to say how this affects things without knowing the technical details.

There is a fair bit of heavy industry in eastern Venezuela, near the Orinoco River. The big hydro-electric dams are there, where a major tributary of the Orinoco comes down from the plateau to the south. There are also major iron ore and bauxite mines and aluminium smelters and steel mills which take advantage of the proximity of these mines to low cost hydro-electric power. The Orinoco is very large, so ships can come up the river to load and unload so there is also easy access to shipping.

Also near there are the heavy oil and oil sands deposits which form the bulk of Venezuela's oil reserves. There are traditional oil wells at the other end of the country around Lake Maracaibo which produced most of Venezuela's output, but the big increases in declared reserves which gives Venezuela more oil than Saudi Arabia come from these heavy oil and oil sands deposits. These are similar in type and roughly comparable in size to the oil sands in Alberta. There are minor differences in chemistry and deposit characteristics which make recovery more difficult than in Alberta, and they don't have the same advanced technological base to drive innovation, but the scale of the deposits shouldn't be underestimated. International competition for influence in the region centres around who will gain control of these unconventional oil deposits.
 
That's quite a lot of conclusion to draw out of two substation fires. The second one doesn't look particularly large either. I'll leave the analysis up to people actually working in the power system industry, but I wouldn't rule arson out of the picture either.
I doubt it's arson, as the outside of a transformer is hardly easy to set on fire, whereas overloading decrepit transformers is a pretty much guaranteed way to get them burning (they're almost invariably oil filled for cooling).
 
That's quite a lot of conclusion to draw out of two substation fires. The second one doesn't look particularly large either. I'll leave the analysis up to people actually working in the power system industry, but I wouldn't rule arson out of the picture either.
Hardly. It is business as usual for Venezuela.
In September 2018, a string of them blew up in Maracaibo, and that was the fourth incident that year.
I would suspect that all of the infrastructure was built in roughly the same time frame, to service the hydro electric plants built in the late 1970s so it is all failing at the same time. The oil filled version transformers have insulation that decays over time,allowing the oil to vapourise and cause a huge fuel air explosion if ignited. Assuming a standard service life of twenty years, all of the Venezuelan kit is probably on its last legs, even if it was last serviced under the Chavez regime. Maduro almost certainly hasn't had the funds to do so.
 
Electric power is being restored in Venezuela on Tuesday. There are no detailed reports, but most seem to say it includes many parts of the country.
Venezuela's Maduro orders U.S. diplomats out, blames 'sabotage' for blackouts | CBC News
The government is saying that power has been restored to most of the country.
Information Minister Jorge Rodriguez said power had been restored in the "vast majority" of the country on Tuesday.
"We are on our way to consolidating the victory of the Venezuelan people over this attack," said Rodriguez. He added that the "electricity war continues," a sign that authorities may still be concerned about ongoing outages.
The news report simply says "many" parts of the country have power again, but it is still out in some areas, including parts of Caracas.
Power returned to many parts of the country on Tuesday, including some areas that had not had electricity since last Thursday, according to witnesses and social media.
But power was still out in parts of the capital of Caracas and the western region near the border with Colombia.
 
Electric power has returned to much of Venezuela, the main oil export terminal is running, and people will be returning to work.
China offers help as Venezuela seeks to restore power amid looting | CBC News
Power had returned to many parts of Venezuela after a nationwide outage last week, with the country's main port terminal of Jose, which is crucial for oil exports, resuming operations. The government said people could return to work on Thursday, following several consecutive public holidays due to the lack of electricity.
School will remain suspended for 24 more hours, Information Minister Jorge Rodriguez said in a state television broadcast on Wednesday, adding that power supply had been broadly restored but problems remained in some areas with transformers that had been "sabotaged."
As mentioned previously, looters robbed stores in various parts of western Venezuela.
Energy supplies remained patchy in the sweltering western state of Zulia, where anger after nearly a week without power overflowed into street violence.
Looters smashed shop windows and made off with merchandise in more than 300 businesses across the state along the border with Colombia, the Zulia chapter of business organization Fedecamaras said in a statement.
China has offered to provide help and technical support in restoring electric power.
China on Wednesday offered to provide help and technical support to restore electricity, and backed Maduro's assertion that the problem was the result of sabotage.
Norway have offered to mediate between the government and the opposition. Norway have not recognised Guaido's claim to be president.
With Maduro still in control of state functions and retaining the loyalty of the armed forces, Norway's foreign ministry said on Wednesday it would be prepared to act as a mediator or facilitator of talks between the government and opposition.
"We are in contact with both sides in Venezuela and can contribute if they so wish," said a Norwegian foreign ministry spokesperson.
The opposition however are apparently not prepared to accept mediation at this time.
"Our position is the same: the conditions are not ripe for mediation or dialogue," said opposition legislator Fernando Sucre, adding that there had not been talks with Norway.
"The agony of the Venezuelan people has increased because of the electricity disaster, and it cannot keep being extended."
 
Electric power has returned to much of Venezuela, the main oil export terminal is running, and people will be returning to work.
China offers help as Venezuela seeks to restore power amid looting | CBC News


As mentioned previously, looters robbed stores in various parts of western Venezuela.


China has offered to provide help and technical support in restoring electric power.


Norway have offered to mediate between the government and the opposition. Norway have not recognised Guaido's claim to be president.


The opposition however are apparently not prepared to accept mediation at this time.
Nice to see that China, friendly supporter of all appalling tyrants worldwide, is displacing Russia, which is quietly giving up on the disaster area yet another of its clients has turned into.

I am sure the Venezuelan people will be happier to see the Chinese ripping them off instead of their own home grown kleptocrats.

Edit-interesting little news item on the multi billion $ Russia squandered on Maduro
How Russia sank billions of dollars into Venezuelan quicksand
 
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Nice to see that China, friendly supporter of all appalling tyrants worldwide, is displacing Russia, which is quietly giving up on the disaster area yet another of its clients has turned into.

I am sure the Venezuelan people will be happier to see the Chinese ripping them off instead of their own home grown kleptocrats.

Edit-interesting little news item on the multi billion $ Russia squandered on Maduro
How Russia sank billions of dollars into Venezuelan quicksand
The story manages to skate around how Rosneft got involved there in the first place. BP needed big bags of cash to pay the US damages for the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, and their Venezuelan operations were one of the assets they had to sell off to come up with the cash. Rosneft supposedly picked up the assets quite cheaply (via several intermediate stages).

This saga goes back quite a few years. American and EU companies were the big players in Venezuela, including Exxon-Mobile, Conoco-Phillips, ENI, Total, and others. A number of smaller Russian companies also got involved.

Most of the world's biggest oil reserves are controlled by state oil companies in the Middle East and it's hard for outsiders to get involved. There are only two places outside of the Middle East with comparable reserves, and these are the unconventional oil deposits in Alberta Canada and the Orinoco region of Venezuela. These are very different from conventional oil and require more advanced technology and a great deal more capital to develop and operate them.

When oil prices were high, the oil majors piled into both with big money. When oil prices fell, they lost interest, cancelled projects, and pulled out of both. The difference between Canada and Venezuela however is that there were local well capitalised and technically advanced major oil companies based in Canada who bought up the interests of the oil multinationals, continued to advance the technology, cut production costs, and carried projects forward.

There was nothing like that in Venezuela. PVDSA did not have the capital or the expertise to take over. They were experienced with conventional oil production in the western part of the country, but the Orinoco Belt is quite a different thing. However, Russian and Chinese companies picked over the bones of projects in Venezuela and bought up what they felt were some good assets at cheap prices as western companies gave up. They do tend to have more appetite for risk than western companies and invest in places where others have given up.

Most of the smaller Russian companies eventually gave up and sold out as well, while Rosneft hung in. I suspect that Rosneft sees the potential for themselves to be a huge player in the international oil industry based on Venezuelan reserves, if only they can get the deposits to produce.

There's a few problems with that plan however. One is that PVDSA is a mandatory majority partner, and they have been under capitalised for many years. The other problem is that it is that developing the oil of the Orinoco is a lot more difficult than most people realise before they get involved.

Seeing a project of this nature through to production also takes a longer time horizon than most western multinationals are willing to commit to. I've seen it here in Canada where they gave up and sold out as soon as oil prices dropped from their peak.

At some point I suspect that Rosneft will decide to cut their losses as well and focus their money back on projects in Russia. I suspect the Chinese will stick around somewhat longer, and might still be there when oil prices rise back up again at which point the western multinationals will want to pile back in for another round of gambling away billions on the banks of the Orinoco.
 
The story manages to skate around how Rosneft got involved there in the first place. BP needed big bags of cash to pay the US damages for the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, and their Venezuelan operations were one of the assets they had to sell off to come up with the cash. Rosneft supposedly picked up the assets quite cheaply (via several intermediate stages).

This saga goes back quite a few years. American and EU companies were the big players in Venezuela, including Exxon-Mobile, Conoco-Phillips, ENI, Total, and others. A number of smaller Russian companies also got involved.

Most of the world's biggest oil reserves are controlled by state oil companies in the Middle East and it's hard for outsiders to get involved. There are only two places outside of the Middle East with comparable reserves, and these are the unconventional oil deposits in Alberta Canada and the Orinoco region of Venezuela. These are very different from conventional oil and require more advanced technology and a great deal more capital to develop and operate them.

When oil prices were high, the oil majors piled into both with big money. When oil prices fell, they lost interest, cancelled projects, and pulled out of both. The difference between Canada and Venezuela however is that there were local well capitalised and technically advanced major oil companies based in Canada who bought up the interests of the oil multinationals, continued to advance the technology, cut production costs, and carried projects forward.

There was nothing like that in Venezuela. PVDSA did not have the capital or the expertise to take over. They were experienced with conventional oil production in the western part of the country, but the Orinoco Belt is quite a different thing. However, Russian and Chinese companies picked over the bones of projects in Venezuela and bought up what they felt were some good assets at cheap prices as western companies gave up. They do tend to have more appetite for risk than western companies and invest in places where others have given up.

Most of the smaller Russian companies eventually gave up and sold out as well, while Rosneft hung in. I suspect that Rosneft sees the potential for themselves to be a huge player in the international oil industry based on Venezuelan reserves, if only they can get the deposits to produce.

There's a few problems with that plan however. One is that PVDSA is a mandatory majority partner, and they have been under capitalised for many years. The other problem is that it is that developing the oil of the Orinoco is a lot more difficult than most people realise before they get involved.

Seeing a project of this nature through to production also takes a longer time horizon than most western multinationals are willing to commit to. I've seen it here in Canada where they gave up and sold out as soon as oil prices dropped from their peak.

At some point I suspect that Rosneft will decide to cut their losses as well and focus their money back on projects in Russia. I suspect the Chinese will stick around somewhat longer, and might still be there when oil prices rise back up again at which point the western multinationals will want to pile back in for another round of gambling away billions on the banks of the Orinoco.
Ain't socialism grand...

another socialist success.jpg
 
Hardly you will find it in MSM.
Pranksters call Venezuela's Guaido as Swiss President
Last week, Vovan and Lexus, the Russian telephone pranksters known for their trolling of politicians from around the world, struck again, releasing audio of their conversations with US special representative for Venezuela Elliott Abrams where, posing as Swiss President Ueli Maurer, they got him to reveal important details on the US-backed effort to overthrow the Latin America's country's legitimate government, Sputnik International reports.
Now it has been revealed along with Abrams, the pranksters also managed to prank Juan Guaido himself. This, it turns out, explains last month's diplomatic faux pass by Guaido, who claimed to have spoken to Maurer about freezing Venezuelan government accounts, while the president's office denied that such a conversation ever took place.
Speaking as 'Maurer', the pranksters assured the opposition leader that he would be able to "manage" the frozen Venezuelan government accounts "as head of state." "Excellent," Guaido replied.

Told that funds would be transferred from Venezuelan officials' accounts to a personal account created for him or his representative, Guaido said that "Yes, of course. I personally understand this situation."
In a humourous moment, the pranksters sent Guaido a draft of the freeze request, mentioning 'Lexus Vovanial Bank Ltd.', a fictitious bank based on their nicknames where they suggested Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro's "criminal monies" were kept.
In a bid to keep the gag going following the 'miscommunication' between Guaido and Zurich, Vovan and Lexus contacted Abrams again, suggesting that the opposition leader had blabbed information which was supposed to stay confidential.

"We contacted Abrams and said that Guaido had made a mistake by revealing everything to the press," the pranksters said, telling him that prematurely revealing the freeze could lead "members of Maduro's clan" to "panic and withdraw all their money from Switzerland."
To their surprise, Abrams took the bait, sending them an email in which he admitted that "Yes – that was an error on his part," and promising to keep "everything confidential" in the future.

"I will let Guaido know, gently, that his comment was an error and should not be repeated," Abrams wrote, offering some insight into the extent of Washington's control of the opposition figure.
You may hear the conversation between two 'presidents'. Enjoy.
 
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Hardly you will find it in MSM.
Pranksters call Venezuela's Guaido as Swiss President






You may hear the conversation between two 'presidents'. Enjoy.
So, liar.

The Rosneft story must be true then, and you have come scuttling along to divert atttention.
All that 'geostrategic' posturing pissed away backing a failed state. Sounds like Syria, doesn't it?
Another zombie regime propped up to further Putin's dreams of world domination.
 
So, liar.

The Rosneft story must be true then, and you have come scuttling along to divert atttention.
All that 'geostrategic' posturing pissed away backing a failed state. Sounds like Syria, doesn't it?
Another zombie regime propped up to further Putin's dreams of world domination.
Reuters is unreliable source and the only source that published these allegations with reference to so called 'internal documents' that could not exist.
The whole story could be just fake news or at best fantasies mixed with real facts.
 
Reuters is unreliable source and the only source that published these allegations with reference to so called 'internal documents' that could not exist.
The whole story could be just fake news or at best fantasies mixed with real facts.
Must remember that next time you quote them.
 
listen to

Your English is poor again.
Thank you for your remark. However, I'm not sure that expression 'you may hear' is not correct in this contexts and expression 'you may listen to' is the only right option.
hear | Definition of hear in English by Oxford Dictionaries
The verb 'to hear' has different meanings including 'to listen to' as one of them.
Using 'to hear' I meant not only 'to listen to' but also proposed to 'be aware', 'to pay attention'.
I believe that the phrase below is absolutely correct English one and it is exactly what I did mean.
And you may hear and see things that you really don't want to.
 

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