Venezuela - coup d'état?

So the US is going to risk international condemnation for 24 Kalashnikovs, instead of 2000?

I smell Maduro Manure
As I understand there are no comments from Washington. US authorities likely would deny any connection to US made weapons discovered in Venezuela. There was no any risk in supplies, as a private company is involved.
Condemnation?
For years CIA was staging bombings of tribal areas in Pakistan with hundreds of innocent victims - children, women, the old. And during years Washington didn't comment, didn't accept any responsibility.
Was it condemned? No. In our imperfect world the might is right.
 
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As I understand there are no comments from Washington. US authorities likely would deny any connection to US made weapons discovered in Venezuela. There was no any risk in supplies, as a private company is involved.
Condemnation?
For years CIA was staging bombings of tribal areas in Pakistan with hundreds of innocent victims - children, women, the old. And during years Washington didn't comment, didn't accept any responsibility.
Was it condemned? No. In our imperfect world the might is right.
Got any proof of that?

Sounds more like what Russia's been doing in Ukraine & Russia's refusal to accept responsibility, including downing an airliner.
 
Got any proof of that?

Sounds more like what Russia's been doing in Ukraine & Russia's refusal to accept responsibility, including downing an airliner.
It is a well known fact
Drone strikes in Pakistan - Wikipedia
Since 2004, the United States government has attacked thousands of targets in Northwest Pakistan using unmanned aerial vehicles (drones) operated by the United States Air Force under the operational control of the Central Intelligence Agency's Special Activities Division.[12][13] Most of these attacks are on targets in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas along the Afghan border in Northwest Pakistan.
These strikes began during the administration of United States President George W. Bush, and increased substantially under his successor Barack Obama.[14] Some in the media have referred to the attacks as a "drone war".[15][16] The George W. Bush administration officially denied the extent of its policy...
However
in May 2013, the Obama administration acknowledged for the first time that four US citizens had been killed in the strikes.[17] The US administration and Pakistani authorities have publicly claimed that civilian deaths from the attacks are minimal...
But as a result
Civilians killed: 424 – 969
Children killed: 172 – 207
84 of the 2,379 dead have been identified as members of al-Qaeda
 
It is a well known fact
Drone strikes in Pakistan - Wikipedia


However

But as a result
Civilians killed: 424 – 969
Children killed: 172 – 207
84 of the 2,379 dead have been identified as members of al-Qaeda
That's not "staging bombings" it's drone strikes.

The term "staging bombings" appears to be an attempt to suggest the CIA were instigating suicide bombings.

Waits for the troll to cry about limited ability in the English language...:roll:
 
That's not "staging bombings" it's drone strikes.

The term "staging bombings" appears to be an attempt to suggest the CIA were instigating suicide bombings.

Waits for the troll to cry about limited ability in the English language...:roll:
Anyway, you now understand what did I mean.
I didn't mention the very word 'suicide'. As for bombings then it is a broad term that I used correctly, did I?
 
I see el presidente is once again blaming the US for all the problems in his country. This comic is relevant again.
05.12.01.WillDestroyYa-X.gif
 

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The US and the government of Venezuela have been apparently been holding secret talks, although there is still no love lost between them and they offer conflicting descriptions of the nature of those talks. Maduro says he hopes to meet Trump directly to resolve their differences. U.S. announces new sanctions against Maduro officials, aid shipment en route | CBC News
A month into Venezuela's high-stakes political crisis, President Nicolas Maduro revealed in an AP interview that his government held secret talks with the Trump administration and predicted he would survive an unprecedented global campaign to force his resignation.
While harshly criticizing U.S. President Donald Trump's confrontational stance toward his socialist government, Maduro said Thursday he hopes to meet the U.S. president soon to resolve a crisis over Venezuela's presidency. The U.S., for its part, said it recognizes Maduro's political opponent Juan Guaido as the rightful leader.
In the meeting the US threatened to "deploy troops" and complained about Venezuela's relations with Cuba, Russia, and allegedly, Hezbollah.
Two senior Venezuelan officials who were not authorized to discuss the meetings publicly said the two encounters between Abrams and Foreign Minister Jorge Arreaza came at the request of the U.S.

They described, on Jan. 26, was described as hostile, with the U.S. envoy threatening Venezuela with the deployment of troops and chastising the Venezuelan government for allegedly being in league with Cuba, Russia and Hezbollah.
Maduro is blaming Venezuela's current economic problems on US sanctions.
At turns conciliatory and combative, Maduro said all Venezuela needs to rebound is for Trump to remove his "infected hand" from the country that sits atop the world's largest petroleum reserves.
Venezuela is apparently planning to make up for the loss of US markets by selling more in Asia, particularly India. Venezuela's oil minister was recently in India at a petroleum conference discussing this possibility.
Maduro said he will make up for the sudden drop in revenue by targeting markets in Asia, especially India, where the head of state-run oil giant PDVSA was this week negotiating new oil sales.
"We've been building a path to Asia for many years," he said. "It's a successful route, every year they are buying larger volumes and amounts of oil."
At a petroleum conference in New Delhi, Venezuela's oil minister, Manuel Quevedo, suggested the country was open to a barter system with India to get around U.S. sanctions.
 
Some interesting information has come out about that photo of a blocked bridge between Venezuela and Columbia which has been so much in the news lately.
How a bridge between Colombia and Venezuela became part of a propaganda fight | CBC News
This is the photo in question.


The photo was being used to illustrate news stories of how the Venezuelan government was preventing aid from reaching their population.
Over the past week or so, the image of a blockaded bridge between Colombia and Venezuela has been all over news sites around the world. It's been featured in stories describing how the president of Venezuela, Nicolas Maduro, is keeping international food aid from his desperate citizens.
I previously posted the above photo here as part of CBC story, but the photo was also used by the Guardian, the BBC, CNN, Bloomberg, and others.
CBC News was among the many news organizations that used the photo in stories, stating that Maduro's forces had purposely blocked the Tienditas Bridge with shipping containers and a fuel tanker.
The photo originated in a Tweet sent by the U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and was used to back the US position that Maduro must go.
On Feb. 6, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo sent a tweet that drew a lot of attention.

The tweet helped back the U.S. position that Maduro is no longer the legitimate president and must go.
However, what the tweet didn't say and what most news organisations didn't apparently know, was that the bridge has never been open since it was originally built.
But what Pompeo didn't say in his tweet — and what many news organizations, including CBC News, didn't report — was that the bridge in the tweet has never been open to traffic.
Here's a photo of the bridge in 2017. The fence and concrete barriers were already there. All that was recently added were the shipping containers and tanker trailer.


The fences were already there, as were the concrete blocks. All that Maduro's forces added last week were the shipping containers and tanker trailer.
The bridge was complete in 2016, but due to disagreements between Columbia and Venezuela there was no agreement to actually open it.
Construction of the bridge was finished in 2016, amid already heated tensions between the two countries. But Colombian and Venezuelan authorities could not reach an agreement to open it. Nearby bridges were already being used to smuggle in goods and fuel from Colombia to Venezuela.
The bridge story is an interesting example of a successful US media op to influence how the news is reported.

The humanitarian aid that is actually sitting in warehouses in Cucuta Columbia is only a fraction of what was actually promised by the US, Canada, and other opposition supporters.
The humanitarian aid Pompeo referred to is currently sitting in warehouses in the Colombian border town of Cucuta. It represents only a fraction of what has been promised from the United States, Canada and other allies of the Venezuelan opposition.

Here's a news story from 2015 which the CBC linked to in describing the bridge closure.
Venezuela closes another border, heightening tensions with Colombia | CBC News
I have included it here as it provides interesting background on the lead up to today's situation.

In the story Venezuela was closing various border crossings to cut smuggling of Venezuelan subsidized food and gasoline to Columbia, as they felt this was costing Venezuela too much money.
President Nicolas Maduro ordered the main crossing in Venezuela's biggest state closed Monday night as part of a two week-old anti-smuggling offensive.
This affected the major Colombian border city of Cucuta, the same one which has been mentioned in many recent news reports from the region. The city relied heavily on gasoline, food, and other goods smuggled from Venezuela.
The crackdown had targeted Tachira state across the border from Cucuta, a Boston-size city in Colombia that has long relied on smuggled gas, food and other goods purchased in Venezuela at bargain-basement subsidized prices.
Apparently much of the smuggling was in the hands of the Wayuu Indians who live on both sides of the border.
Maduro could also face resistance from hundreds of thousands of Wayuu Indians settled on either side of the border who don't recognize the international division. The tribe has long dominated economic life on the isolated Guajira peninsula, shared by both countries on South America's northern tip, and is heavily involved in smuggling, which they don't consider an illicit act.
Venezuelan authorities said they will respect the Wayuu's traditional nomadism and increase education grant programs even as an additional 3,000 troops are deployed to Zulia.
"They are masters of their own land," Vice-President Jorge Arreaza said. "They will be free to move back and forth, just not with contraband."
Venezuela was also deporting Colombians, blaming them for crime and smuggling.
In the space of two weeks, Maduro has closed six crossings and deported about 1,500 Colombians without legal status, blaming the migrants for a surge in crime and contraband along Venezuela's western edge.
About 20,000 Colombians had already returned voluntarily rather than going through deportation.
Nearly 20,000 more Colombians, some of whom have lived in Venezuela for years, have returned voluntarily, fearing reprisals as reports spread about security forces uprooting migrants and marking their homes for demolition.
There were apparently 5 million Colombians living in Venezuela.
The social effects the border offensive has had on the estimated five million Colombians nationals living in Venezuela is more subtle, but could also be longer-lasting.
The flood of returning Colombians was causing a humanitarian crisis in Colombia.
The flood of returnees has overwhelmed emergency shelters, leading Colombia to warn of a looming humanitarian crisis.
The Colombian foreign minister went to the UN to complain about what she said was Colombians being made scapegoats for Venezuela's own problems.
Foreign Minister Maria Angela Holguin met with the United Nations' High Commissioner for Human Rights in Geneva on Monday to denounce what she called a deliberate campaign of scapegoating Colombians for Venezuela's deep-seated economic problems, which include widespread shortages and triple-digit inflation.
Maduro complained that he was the target of US backed conservatives in Colombia who wanted to overthrow him while ignoring the widespread political and drug violence in Colombia which had driven so many Colombians to Venezuela.
Maduro says he is the target of U.S.-backed conservatives in Colombia bent on toppling his socialist government while turning a blind eye to decades of political and drug-fuelled violence in Colombia that has made Venezuela a haven for many of its neighbour's poor.
Perhaps Maduro should have promised to build a wall and make the Colombians pay for it.
 

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