Venezuela - coup d'état?

The story was presented by different sources
https://www.smh.com.au/world/south-...eapons-to-maduro-enemies-20190208-p50wmg.html


Oh... I have forgotten - The Sydney Morning Herald is a part of vast Putin's agitprop machine.
As above, only what the current Venezuelan authorities say. No independent verification.

Btw, @scalieback, has your paymasters from Reuters reported about it?
You often use that when you have no argument and get pulled up for having multiple DIDS on other threads. As it happens, no idea as it’s single source reporting. Have you looked?
 
Exclusive: U.S. in direct contact with Venezuelan military, urging defections - source | Reuters
Meanwhile ..... It looks like the US is in direct contact with the Venezuelan military. Unfortunately, it’s an ‘anonymous US official’ but interesting not only if true, but if it has any effect:
“We believe these to be those first couple pebbles before we start really seeing bigger rocks rolling down the hill,” the official said this week, speaking on condition of anonymity. “We’re still having conversations with members of the former Maduro regime, with military members, although those conversations are very, very limited.”

The official declined to provide details on the discussions or the level at which they are being held, and it was unclear whether such contacts could create cracks in the Venezuelan socialist leader’s support from the military, which is pivotal to his grip on power.
The possible future sanctions they are considering are secondary ones eg on companies which do business with already sanctioned companies or individuals:
Previous rounds have targeted dozens of Venezuelan military and government officials, including Maduro himself, and last month finally hit the OPEC member’s vital oil sector. But the administration has stopped short of imposing so-called “secondary” sanctions, which would punish non-U.S. companies for doing business with the Venezuela government or the state oil monopoly PDVSA.
 
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18 months in the making and here's where we find ourselves.

A year after the above leaked doc and 6 months ago the US were up to their usual tricks.
Setting the stage in their blatant SOP fashion.

Rubio urges U.S. to put Venezuela on state-sponsored terror list
Marco Rubio urged the State Department to add Venezuela to the list of countries sponsoring terrorism, a designation that would expand the range of sanctions that could be applied.

2mths after the above-

U.S. considers adding Venezuela to terrorism sponsors list: source | Reuters
Discussions on the issue have moved forward in recent days with strong lobbying from
Republican Senator Marco Rubio

1549664346623.png

Rubio doesn't appear to like Maduro too much and doesn't seem to be a fan of Venezuelan self-governance.
Wonder if anyone else noticed?



(The above blocked bridge has never even been opened for traffic since construction ended in 2016 BTW)
Puente internacional Las Tienditas - Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre
Another way to remove the barriers to humanitarian aid would be to lift the sanctions since they are are a barrier to humanitarian aid and are considered to be crimes against humanity according to Article 7 or the Rome Statute of the ICC.
The countries backing this coup don't have the moral high ground here.


1549665983488.png

"Maduro is starving us to death"
 
Exclusive: U.S. in direct contact with Venezuelan military, urging defections - source | Reuters
Meanwhile ..... It looks like the US is in direct contact with the Venezuelan military. Unfortunately, it’s an ‘anonymous US official’
The key expression here is 'anonymous US official'. So they are only rumours.
I'm absolutely sure that Washington will not interfere into internal affairs in foreign countries because it contradics to democratic principles that the USA promotes.
 
As above, only what the current Venezuelan authorities say. No independent verification.


You often use that when you have no argument and get pulled up for having multiple DIDS on other threads. As it happens, no idea as it’s single source reporting. Have you looked?
Some claims can be independently ferified.
https://www.smh.com.au/world/south-...eapons-to-maduro-enemies-20190208-p50wmg.html
An Ottawa, Canada-based analyst of unusual ship and plane movements, Steffan Watkins, drew attention to the frequent flights of the 21 Air cargo plane in a series of tweets on Thursday, US time.
"All year, they were flying between Philadelphia and Miami and all over the place, but all continental US," Watkins said in a telephone interview. "Then all of a sudden in January, things changed."
That's when the cargo plane began flying to destinations in Colombia and Venezuela on a daily basis, and sometimes multiple times a day, Watkins said. The plane has made close to 40 round-trip flights from Miami International Airport to Caracas and Valencia in Venezuela, and Bogota and Medellin in Colombia since January 11.
The most recent tracking of the aircraft showed it arrived from Medellin into Miami airport after midnight on Thursday.
Flight records from the tracking site flightradar24.com, monitored by Watkins, indicate that the 21 Air cargo plane flew at least four times to Valencia from Miami and another four times to Caracas from Miami since January 11. In many cases, the flights would head on to Bogota or Medellin before returning to Miami.
Oh... I have forgotten that Watkins is likely Russian troll and flightradar24 is a part of vast Putin's agitprop machine.
The strange flights have not been explained.
 
The key expression here is 'anonymous US official'. So they are only rumours.
I'm absolutely sure that Washington will not interfere into internal affairs in foreign countries because it contradics to democratic principles that the USA promotes.
So this wouldn't be the most blatant coup they've ever pulled?...and they've pulled many coups over the years.
 
The key expression here is 'anonymous US official'. So they are only rumours.
I'm absolutely sure that Washington will not interfere into internal affairs in foreign countries because it contradics to democratic principles that the USA promotes.
That is the reason why I stated the phrase. But then you’re in ‘full agitprop mode’. I’m sure you’d be happy with Putin banning members of the opposition from running, calling early elections, delaying them etc.
Some claims can be independently ferified.
https://www.smh.com.au/world/south-...eapons-to-maduro-enemies-20190208-p50wmg.html

Oh... I have forgotten that Watkins is likely Russian troll and flightradar24 is a part of vast Putin's agitprop machine.
The strange flights have not been explained.
The flights are not explained, like the Wagner flights. Still, carry on with your ‘one track’ line of dissemination.
 
The flights are not explained...
Do you think that US authorities should investigate the case, including these strange flights and ask for serial numbers on US made weapons to establish the source?
Unauthorised international arms trade is a criminal business.
 
Unauthorised international arms trade is a criminal business.
You mean like supplying tanks, artillery, ammunition & complete military units to terrorists in Ukraine.

I hope you wake at night remembering the little dead kid & his dead mother, courtesy of Russian supplied rosket artillery.
 
Do you think that US authorities should investigate the case, including these strange flights and ask for serial numbers on US made weapons to establish the source?
Serial numbers? Seriously? How about every serial number of every AK used in Somalia, or Sudan, or Kenya, or Nigeria or even Venezuela?
Unauthorised international arms trade is a criminal business.
It is, all over the world.

You’re still supporting a regime I see whose very actions you would not support in Russia. Why is that?
 
China calls for peaceful talks to resolve Venezuela issue | Reuters
PRC agrees that it’s problems should be dealt with by its people and notably within its constitution and the law. Through peaceful dialogue and political channels:
“Venezuela’s affairs should be resolved by its people within the framework of the constitution and the law through peaceful dialogue and political channels,” the ministry said.

“Only this way can Venezuela realizing lasting stability.”

$50Bn in loans, but the money appears to have dried up since the economy began spiralling in 2015:
China has lent more than $50 billion to Venezuela through oil-for-loan agreements over the past decade, securing energy supplies for its fast-growing economy.

But the financing dried up as the South American country’s economy began spiraling downward in 2015, pressured by plummeting oil prices.
 
Inside the forbidden slums still loyal to Maduro
Sky report on the slums in which Venezuela’s poor live. The ‘home of the Chávez revolution’, where they will site their AAA ‘when the gringo’s attack’, where they live in squalor, empty fridges (which run) and the weight from 120kg is now ‘half that’ yet they still support the revolution.

Worth reading imo, and these are the people along with the military Guaido needs to convince he can help or at least keep ‘the ideal’ alive.
 
Venezuelan oil joint ventures switch to Russian bank
Customers of joint-venture operations run by Venezuela’s state run oil company PDVSA have being told they must now deposit payments with Russian bank Gazprombank, according to reports.
Btw, Gazprombank is currently under the sanctions imposed by Washington previously.
The move comes after the United States imposed new financial sanctions aimed at preventing oil revenues reaching the government of President Nicolas Maduro.
Sanctions, sanctions... sanctions again.
Norway's Equinor and France's Total are among the companies who run joint ventures with PDVSA. Previously customers of these operations had been allowed to place funds in European or American bank
So international corporations face a hard choice - close their profitable business in Venezuela or face angry reaction of Washington.
The same information is reported by Reuters
Exclusive: Venezuela shifts oil ventures' accounts to Russian bank - document, sources | Reuters
Meanwhile according to reputable Russian newspaper Kommersant
Газпромбанк отрицает перевод счетов PDVSA
Gazprombank denies that bank accounts related to joint ventures with PDVSA (state-run Velezuelan oil company) have been transferred to the bank.
However, Russian mass media report about another scheme
СП PDVSA доставляют ей легкую нефть для смешивания с тяжелой и экспорта
Russian state run oil company Rosneft supplies PDVSA with light oil to mix it with Venezuelan heavy oil and gets some mixed oil as a result of barter operation. It in turn is being sold on the World market as Russian oil. As a result of the operations PDVSA could have some money in Russian banks.
 
Just now RBC-TV (Ros Business Consulting TV channel) reported that Gazprombank recognised that it opened previously bank account for PDVSA but there are no any new accounts recently opened.
 
(...) However, Russian mass media report about another scheme
СП PDVSA доставляют ей легкую нефть для смешивания с тяжелой и экспорта
Russian state run oil company Rosneft supplies PDVSA with light oil to mix it with Venezuelan heavy oil and gets some mixed oil as a result of barter operation. It in turn is being sold on the World market as Russian oil. (...)
I read the above article, and it doesn't say quite what you seem to think it does. Here's a Google Translate version:
MECHYKO, Feb 8 PRIME. The Venezuelan PDVSA began to mix its heavy oil with lighter oil due to the absence of imported diluents due to US sanctions in order to be able to export it, Reuters reported, citing its sources.

Joint ventures with foreign partners operating in the Orinoco area deliver these state-owned company mixes in order for PDVSA to export it.

Venezuelan heavy oil needs thinners for sale overseas. US refineries are focused on refining such oil, but the state announced on January 28 that it would impose sanctions on PDVSA, blocking its assets and interests in its jurisdiction for $ 7 billion, and also banning transactions with them. Venezuelan representative in OPEC and PDVSA technical adviser and the country's ministry of oil Ronny Romero told RIA Novosti that PDVSA will redirect oil supplies from the US to Europe and Asia will do everything possible so that the situation in the country does not affect the world market.

However, according to experts, in this case the question arises of the cost of transporting Venezuelan oil.

Earlier, the Wall Street Journal reported, citing sources, that oil exports from Venezuela fell sharply after the imposition of sanctions by Washington against the country and continues to fall. According to sources, the decline in exports led to the fact that oil production fell to below 1 million barrels per day, which is 10% less than in December, and less than half of the indicators of a year and a half ago.
Venezuela needs to import "diluent" to thin out the heavy oil they produce so it can be pumped through pipelines and into and out of oil tankers for export. Diluent is simply any very light petroleum product which can act as a thinner. They had been importing diluent from the US, as that was their biggest market.

Because their companies cannot do business in the US now, they need to find a new source of diluent if they are to continue to export. This was reported in the press previously. It appears from your link that they have found a new source for diluent, but it doesn't say exactly how they are doing it or where it is coming from.

The exact same process is used in Canada. The heavy oil is known as "bitumen", and the diluted product is called "diluted bitumen". Some of the diluent used in Canada is also imported from the US, due to not enough being produced as refinery by-product in Canada. This is simply a reflection of the relative amount of domestic oil consumption and therefore refinery capacity and location. In this case it arrives in diluent import pipelines which run from US refineries to Alberta. The bitumen is then mixed with diluent and sent back in other pipelines. In Canada the proportion is roughly 30% diluent in diluted bitumen. The diluent may be separated from the diluted bitumen at the refinery and recycled, or it may be used as is or resold for other purposes, depending upon market conditions.

Some diluent is also produced from natural gas liquids. I don't think that Venezuela are a big producer of natural gas, so they likely don't have this source and must depend on refinery product diluents.

Some bitumen is "upgraded" at processing plants in Alberta to turn it into synthetic crude oil, in which case it is shipped just like normal crude oil and doesn't need diluent.

There is also work being done on converting the bitumen into solid bricks (referred to as "pucks") and shipped by rail and ship as a solid. At the customer refinery it would then be re-liquefied before going through the normal refinery process. This is still experimental, but a small pilot project plant has been announced. I'm not sure what the supposed advantages of this are, other than perhaps environmental through less risk of an oil spill in a derailment. Quite a bit of bitumen and conventional oil are shipped by rail right now as is.

To go back to Venezuela, they apparently have found a new source for diluent, and so will be able to continue to export oil so long as they have customers. The main effect of cutting off the US as a customer (and supplier of diluent) is to raise transportation costs for Venezuela. How much this amounts to in practice remains to be seen. The US will also face higher transportation costs for the oil they import from elsewhere.

Although Canada and Venezuela compete directly for the same markets and with similar grades of oil, Canada will not be increasing oil exports to the US to any significant degree due to infrastructure bottlenecks which will not be relieved until some time next year or so.
 
I read the above article, and it doesn't say quite what you seem to think it does. Here's a Google Translate version:


Venezuela needs to import "diluent" to thin out the heavy oil they produce so it can be pumped through pipelines and into and out of oil tankers for export. Diluent is simply any very light petroleum product which can act as a thinner. They had been importing diluent from the US, as that was their biggest market.

Because their companies cannot do business in the US now, they need to find a new source of diluent if they are to continue to export. This was reported in the press previously. It appears from your link that they have found a new source for diluent, but it doesn't say exactly how they are doing it or where it is coming from.
I'm sorry. I have heard about the scheme on radio. As the key point here is Russia's supplies of "diluent" then I just picked the first random article about it. The expert on radio Business FM alleged that the "diluent" is actually Saudi light oil that Russia in turn (virtually) exchanged for its more heavier oil exported to Europe.
As Venezuela hasn't money to pay for the "diluent" then the scheme looks as plausible. Russia's Rosneft could receive Venezuelan oil mixed with "diluent" as payment (in barter form) for its supplies.
The exact same process is used in Canada. The heavy oil is known as "bitumen", and the diluted product is called "diluted bitumen". Some of the diluent used in Canada is also imported from the US, due to not enough being produced as refinery by-product in Canada. This is simply a reflection of the relative amount of domestic oil consumption and therefore refinery capacity and location. In this case it arrives in diluent import pipelines which run from US refineries to Alberta. The bitumen is then mixed with diluent and sent back in other pipelines. In Canada the proportion is roughly 30% diluent in diluted bitumen. The diluent may be separated from the diluted bitumen at the refinery and recycled, or it may be used as is or resold for other purposes, depending upon market conditions.

Some diluent is also produced from natural gas liquids. I don't think that Venezuela are a big producer of natural gas, so they likely don't have this source and must depend on refinery product diluents.

Some bitumen is "upgraded" at processing plants in Alberta to turn it into synthetic crude oil, in which case it is shipped just like normal crude oil and doesn't need diluent.

There is also work being done on converting the bitumen into solid bricks (referred to as "pucks") and shipped by rail and ship as a solid. At the customer refinery it would then be re-liquefied before going through the normal refinery process. This is still experimental, but a small pilot project plant has been announced. I'm not sure what the supposed advantages of this are, other than perhaps environmental through less risk of an oil spill in a derailment. Quite a bit of bitumen and conventional oil are shipped by rail right now as is.

To go back to Venezuela, they apparently have found a new source for diluent, and so will be able to continue to export oil so long as they have customers. The main effect of cutting off the US as a customer (and supplier of diluent) is to raise transportation costs for Venezuela. How much this amounts to in practice remains to be seen. The US will also face higher transportation costs for the oil they import from elsewhere.

Although Canada and Venezuela compete directly for the same markets and with similar grades of oil, Canada will not be increasing oil exports to the US to any significant degree due to infrastructure bottlenecks which will not be relieved until some time next year or so.
The USA is (or at least was) very important trade partner for Venezuela as a biggest buyer of Venezuelan oil and the supplier of "diluents". Also as oil prices are nominated in US dollars then Washington hoped that after the santions against PDVSA were imposed, Maduro would have no choice but surrender.
It appears however that real life is much more complex than many in Washington think.

In more wide context, Russia now is active in Latin America from point of view of economy.
Cuban Steel Factory is Refurbished with Russian Investment (+Photos)
Some 165 million dollars is the amount of a Russian investment destined to the total refurbishment of an important steel plant in Cuba, whose production of steel bars for construction represents a strategic material.
The transformation of the enterprise, also known as Antillana de Acero, will include several neuralgic aspects: capital repair of nine facilities, assembly of 15 gantry cranes, total modification of the power-energy system...
The last point includes building of new generation power blocks on the Habana Este power plant. The project was launched a few years ago and it looks as Venezuelan oil (fuel oil produced from it) will be used.
Russia to install four power generators in Cuba
Russian electrical power generating company Inter RAO has signed a deal with Cuba's Energoimport to install four power generators costing €1.2 billion.
Just a few days ago our firm received requirements for power measurement equipment (in Russian and in Spanish). As we produce under license agreement Israeli measurement instruments then our proposition was accepted especially taking into account that there is full documentation in Spanish and the software has also Spanish interface (our Israeli partners export their devices to 40 countries including Spain and some Latin American countries).
 

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