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Vendee Globe Finish.

Vendee Globe

Video accounts of the rescue (with English subtitles) from Jean and Kevin:
News - PRB's rescue: videos that tell the story - Vendée Globe - En

Transcribed to text here:
News - Escoffier's Rescue, Mission Accomplished. Yes He Did! - Vendée Globe - En



Jean LeCam has been receiving lots of messages for which he gives thanks.

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Fleet positions as of 11:00 UTC. Rescuers are still in the top ten.*
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Latest rankings after two retirements. Note that Alex is still ranked in the table for now, in 14th place, despite taking his time.
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* At this point there is no information about what Jean's instructions are with regard to getting Kevin to Cape Town. Winds are favourable so they could sail there in two days or maybe rendezvous with a ship in the next day. Too soon to tell if one of three vessels (two cargo vessels and a tug or special vessel) has a route to Cape Town. I don't have access to their destination and speed. They are still a long way off and Yes We Cam! is probably faster under sail.
 
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Vendee Globe - Latest update from Kevin about the incident and rescue:

From Mayday to Safely Aboard Yes We Cam! Kevin Escoffier Explains​

Speaking this morning after being rescued Kevin Escoffier said,

The damage
“It’s unbelievable what happened. The boat folded up on a wave at 27 knots. I heard a bang, but to be honest, I didn’t need to hear that to know what had happened. I looked at the bow. It was at 90°. In a few seconds, there was water everywhere. The stern was under water and the bow was pointing up to the sky. The boat split in half in front of the mast bulkhead. It was as if she folded up. I promise. I’m not exaggerating. There was an angle of 90° between the stern and the bow.
Mayday
“I didn’t have time to do anything. I just had time to send a message to my team. I’m sinking I’m not joking. MAYDAY. Between the moment when I was out on deck trimming the sails and when I found myself in my survival suit, barely two minutes had passed. It all happened extremely quickly.”
Organising my survival
“I came out of the boat and put on my survival suit. I could see smoke. The electronics were burning. Everything went off. My only reflex was to grab my telephone to send the message and pick up the survival suit which I never stow away. I wanted to pick up the grab bag, but I couldn’t get to it with the water rising. I grabbed the liferaft at the stern. Open I couldn’t get into it as it was three metres under the water. The water was up to the door in the cockpit.”
Jumping in the raft
“I would have liked to have stayed a bit longer on board, but I could see it was all happening quickly and a big breaker came and I was in the water with the liferaft. At that point I was not feeling very confident. Being in a raft in 35 knots of wind is not reassuring. I was only reassured when I saw Jean. But the problem was to find a way to get on board with him. We said a few words. It was a real battlefield out on the water. He was forced to move away, but I could see he remained close by. I stayed in the raft until early this morning.”
The recovery
“I didn’t know whether the weather would ease enough to carry out a manoeuvre. He was 2 metres from me. He sent me a line, but it was difficult to stop the boat. In the end I managed to reach some tubing and lift myself aboard. The sea was still heavy with 3.5m high waves. It is hard in such conditions to climb aboard a 60’ boat, particularly as it is hard in the survival suit. It’s lucky I’m in good shape physically, as I can promise you it is not easy.”

Aboard Yes We Cam!
When I found myself on board with Jean, we hugged each other. He said to me. ‘Shit you’re aboard. That was tricky!’ I replied, ‘I have spoilt your race. You were doing so well.’ He replied, ‘That doesn’t matter. Last time it was me who upset Vincent’s race.’
What next?
“For the moment, I don’t know what will happen. We’ll sort that out with the Race Directors. I have just slept for 2 hours and am well rested. I have eaten something. I did all I could with the boat. I reinforced her and did everything. So I don’t have any regrets about what I did.”

News - From Mayday to Safely Aboard Yes We Cam! Kevin Escoffier Explains - Vendée Globe - En

Video from assistant race director Hubert Lemmonier. Not much to add from previous accounts but his take on events. No news yet on decision as to getting Kevin back ashore.

 
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Latest official Vendee Globe episode in English. Interviews with Kevin and race director Jaques Carres.
Unlike glass fibre, carbon fibre is electrically conductive and tends to block radio signals, so Kevin tried to put the EPIRB over the side of the boat and in doing so went over the side himself. Rather than stay with what was floating due to air pockets, he made the decision to leave the boat completely and stay in the life raft.

ETA:

Thomas Ruyant (LinkedOut) passes the longitude of Cape Horn in second​

This afternoon Thomas Ruyant passed the longitude of the Cape of Good Hope in second place in the Vendee Globe. He crossed at 1341hrs UTC so in an elapsed time of 23 days 21 minutes, just 14 hrs and 30 mins after leader Charlie Dalin (Apivia). News - Thomas Ruyant (LinkedOut) passes the longitude of Cape Horn in second - Vendée Globe - En

ETA: I wonder if Alex is choosing to wait it out in calmer conditions, proceeding at around 10 kts, until there is a smoother passage to the Cape.
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Those who were involved in Kevin's rescue are mostly making good speed, even Jean. Sabastien has overtaken Daien Seguin to gain 4th position. Boris, Jean and Yannick are in 6th 7th and 8th places respectively.

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Vendee Globe Today's episode of Sea Wolves.

Florian imparts some very useful information about the rules, as they apply to the rescuing sailor. He has to take the rescued sailor to the nearest port of convenience, which will be Cape Town. There, Kevin will disembark but Jean must stay aboard. He cannot talk with anyone, asides from hello, goodbye, etc and cannot take any assistance. However, he is permitted to take on additional food and water to compensate for what he has used in the rescue. He then remains in the race and is expected to complete the race under the rules. Jean and the other rescue party will be given a time allowance from when they were asked to reroute for the rescue. The correction will be applied at he end of the race. :thumright:

Tomorrow, Wednesday, Florian will talk a lot more about Jules Verne.

Sea Wolves - Vendee Globe 2020 report - Catastrophe at sea! The rescue of PRB's Kevin Escoffier!


Paused half way through to check 17:00 positions.

Alex manoeuvring out of weakening winds, as a little too slow for the passage to Cape Town. It's still going to be windy on the way in but by running with partial sails and the wind behind him, hopefully it will be a bit smoother with less gust induced roll.

Jean continuing Eastwards for the stronger winds which should speed up the journey to cape Town. 21 kts vs 18 kts can save a few hours.

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Unbelievable story in a sense, to be bouncing around in a life raft in 35 knot winds and high seas must be terrifying, difficult to spot by rescuers in the first place managing to climb aboard must be an intense feeling of relief for all parties.
 
Unbelievable story in a sense, to be bouncing around in a life raft in 35 knot winds and high seas must be terrifying, difficult to spot by rescuers in the first place managing to climb aboard must be an intense feeling of relief for all parties.
Yes, particularly if there is nobody anywhere near. As was mentioned in one of the videos, he was fortunate that there was a certain amount of compression ie a number of yachts within range. Kevin also had the benefit of preparation, faith in his equipment, immersion suit, EPIRB, personal HF AIS and life raft.

As you know, getting in a raft is just the start of a new set of procedures that have to be followed to make good the raft and keep it in order, maintaining self through hydration, having a few calories and trying to reduce heat loss. Any kind of closed cell foam can really help insulate the body core from heat loss through conduction through the floor of that cold waterbed.
 
Safety kit - Emergency Locator Beacons.

I thought I might post some info about emergency position locators, as it's topical and we have just had an example of their use in locating the survivor of a wrecked yacht in the Southern Ocean. Just a few acronyms and links to sources of more information. Those experienced with this kit, please feel free to correct or comment.

EPIRB = Emegency Position Indicating Radio Beacon
PLB = Personal locator Beacon - miniature version of EPIRB
AIS = Automatic identification system - Primary use is collision avoidance
AIS-SART = AIS Search And Rescue Transmitter
HF-AIS? = Enhanced AIS for better alert reliability*
SEND = Satellite Emergency Notification Device e.g Garmin InReach
GMDSS = Global Maritime Distress and Safety System

*Wait a minute. I thought AIS operated on VHF? It does. Why HF? The HF in this case has nothing to do with transmission frequency. Confusing eh? It's to do with onboard processing of data which is claimed to make the unit more effective than standard class A and Class B devices. It uses VHF as normal, so no need to worry about how to suspend several meters of wire in the air above the raft. Thank goodness for that.

Selecting an Emergency Beacon | West Marine
Be Safe and Be Seen with AIS | West Marine
Choosing a SEND Device | West Marine

As well as beacons, Some VHF marine radios can be used to send preconfigured messages very quickly.
These can include vessel details and GPS position, if the radio has GPS or is connected to GPS.
Enabling Your VHF Radio Safety Features | West Marine
Kevin may have been using a hand held marine VHF radio in the dingy.

Longer distance communication, beyond line of sight requires MF/HF SSB radios or satellite transceivers.
 
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QRK2

LE
Vendee Globe - Latest update from Kevin about the incident and rescue:

From Mayday to Safely Aboard Yes We Cam! Kevin Escoffier Explains​

Speaking this morning after being rescued Kevin Escoffier said,

The damage
“It’s unbelievable what happened. The boat folded up on a wave at 27 knots. I heard a bang, but to be honest, I didn’t need to hear that to know what had happened. I looked at the bow. It was at 90°. In a few seconds, there was water everywhere. The stern was under water and the bow was pointing up to the sky. The boat split in half in front of the mast bulkhead. It was as if she folded up. I promise. I’m not exaggerating. There was an angle of 90° between the stern and the bow.
Mayday
“I didn’t have time to do anything. I just had time to send a message to my team. I’m sinking I’m not joking. MAYDAY. Between the moment when I was out on deck trimming the sails and when I found myself in my survival suit, barely two minutes had passed. It all happened extremely quickly.”
Organising my survival
“I came out of the boat and put on my survival suit. I could see smoke. The electronics were burning. Everything went off. My only reflex was to grab my telephone to send the message and pick up the survival suit which I never stow away. I wanted to pick up the grab bag, but I couldn’t get to it with the water rising. I grabbed the liferaft at the stern. Open I couldn’t get into it as it was three metres under the water. The water was up to the door in the cockpit.”
Jumping in the raft
“I would have liked to have stayed a bit longer on board, but I could see it was all happening quickly and a big breaker came and I was in the water with the liferaft. At that point I was not feeling very confident. Being in a raft in 35 knots of wind is not reassuring. I was only reassured when I saw Jean. But the problem was to find a way to get on board with him. We said a few words. It was a real battlefield out on the water. He was forced to move away, but I could see he remained close by. I stayed in the raft until early this morning.”
The recovery
“I didn’t know whether the weather would ease enough to carry out a manoeuvre. He was 2 metres from me. He sent me a line, but it was difficult to stop the boat. In the end I managed to reach some tubing and lift myself aboard. The sea was still heavy with 3.5m high waves. It is hard in such conditions to climb aboard a 60’ boat, particularly as it is hard in the survival suit. It’s lucky I’m in good shape physically, as I can promise you it is not easy.”

Aboard Yes We Cam!
When I found myself on board with Jean, we hugged each other. He said to me. ‘Shit you’re aboard. That was tricky!’ I replied, ‘I have spoilt your race. You were doing so well.’ He replied, ‘That doesn’t matter. Last time it was me who upset Vincent’s race.’
What next?
“For the moment, I don’t know what will happen. We’ll sort that out with the Race Directors. I have just slept for 2 hours and am well rested. I have eaten something. I did all I could with the boat. I reinforced her and did everything. So I don’t have any regrets about what I did.”

News - From Mayday to Safely Aboard Yes We Cam! Kevin Escoffier Explains - Vendée Globe - En

Video from assistant race director Hubert Lemmonier. Not much to add from previous accounts but his take on events. No news yet on decision as to getting Kevin back ashore.


Frightening echoes of 1992, so relieved that the ending was better in his case.
 
Safety kit - life raft

Some obvious differences in this video are that it is a planned abandonment from a perfectly good vessel, with 15 minutes to prepare from hearing the alarm, not 2 minutes. Also there are 12 people in the raft. However, it has waves, wind, rolling around in the sea and darkness.

 
Vendee Globe 9pm position update

Now that Alex (Black boat) has a little more wind, I wonder if he is now setting course for Cape Town?
Jean Le Cam, with Kevin aboard, is following the official route, perhaps choosing to turn once he has crossed the Cape Town or Cape of Good Hope longitude point? That would set a neat demarcation point I suppose and a point to return to the race. No significant place changes since this morning.
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Story this morning in the U.S where a lone sailor woke up to find his 32' mv sinking 86 miles offshore - fast. He managed to get out without his EPIRB, grab bag, or anything else.

Article:
A missing Florida sailor has been found clinging to his upturned boat, having survived a night at sea before being rescued 86 miles off the Florida coast by a passing container ship.

Stuart Bee, 62, left Cape Marina at Port Canaveral on Friday afternoon, aboard his 32ft vessel Sea Ray. He did not return and was reported missing on Saturday. A large air and sea mission was immediately launched.

It did not turn up any sign of the Sea Ray but vessels in a large area off Florida were told to keep an eye out for the missing mariner. One such ship, the Angeles, spotted the upturned Sea Ray, complete with Bee holding tightly to its prow, the only part of the capsized boat above water.

1606858887402.png
The 32' Sea Ray developed mechanical issues before he was woken on Saturday night by a sudden rush of water into his cabin which pushed him outside.
 
Story this morning in the U.S where a lone sailor woke up to find his 32' mv sinking 86 miles offshore - fast. He managed to get out without his EPIRB, grab bag, or anything else.

Article:
A missing Florida sailor has been found clinging to his upturned boat, having survived a night at sea before being rescued 86 miles off the Florida coast by a passing container ship.

Stuart Bee, 62, left Cape Marina at Port Canaveral on Friday afternoon, aboard his 32ft vessel Sea Ray. He did not return and was reported missing on Saturday. A large air and sea mission was immediately launched.

It did not turn up any sign of the Sea Ray but vessels in a large area off Florida were told to keep an eye out for the missing mariner. One such ship, the Angeles, spotted the upturned Sea Ray, complete with Bee holding tightly to its prow, the only part of the capsized boat above water.

View attachment 525470The 32' Sea Ray developed mechanical issues before he was woken on Saturday night by a sudden rush of water into his cabin which pushed him outside.
Saw BBC version earlier posted by @merchantman https://www.arrse.co.uk/community/threads/those-in-peril-upon-the-sea.263061/post-10416959 He was very fortunate indeed to be found.
 
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Google translation: Hello Mr President? Jean and Kevin were surprised to have @EmmanuelMacron on the phone ! A nice exchange that we will tell you tomorrow from a different angle

Found in the comments:
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Earlier post:
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Google translation: Evening photo by @KevinEscoffier ! Are they not there? It's nice to see It's not idle aboard #yeswecam! The two skippers have a series of press appointments! You may see them on your screens tonight !!
 
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Placemarking, to follow this thread. More of a lurker so don't know how to put on a "watch list"? Thanks for a great read. I see bits re Alex Thomson on my local BBC news but hooked now after reading this post. Cheers
 
Placemarking, to follow this thread. More of a lurker so don't know how to put on a "watch list"? Thanks for a great read. I see bits re Alex Thomson on my local BBC news but hooked now after reading this post. Cheers
Great that you are enjoying it as much as us. Go to the top of the page and check watch status. If it says Unwatch, you are already watching the thread. If it says watch, click on it. Hope that helps?
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