Vehicle Road Tax to be replaced by a pay by mile tax.

BaldBaBoon

War Hero
Maybe a slight thread drift on the discussion I created.

( Pandemic restrictions obviously are a curve ball )

I believe that we are living at the pinacle of private vehicle ownership and I honestly believe we are on a downward spiral in so many ways from now on.

I really do think that in the not so far future ,you are not going to be able make plans anymore to travel to the far side of Europe or even further by car, bike, camper van or whatever, like we used to. The push for electric vehicles will essentially mean you are completely reliant and restricted to a regulated network, basically no more going off the beaten path. The last time I rode my bike to Morroco and back, most of the fuel you got was from a chap with a container of Benz at the exit from the town, with a few cans of benz on the back of the bike for isolated areas......cant see that happening with electric vehicles.

I am heavily encouraging my wife to write down about her extensive travels backpacking around the world, where her best friend and herself saw China, Asia and the Americas as two western ( one being a half Burmese/Scot ) girls using the local transport and trains and the amazing experience of living with the locals.

I am doing the same, recording all the trips I did by motorbike where I buggered off and travelled around the world on my own, riding for weeks through isolated areas,through deserts and the outback.

These writings, pictures and stories are what we can leave for the youngsters in our family who, sadly, will likely never have the chance to do the same.....the great adventure of just going off grid and go your own way.

I so sound like a hippy.
 
A North American client of mine has utilised the distance conference and training solutions it used to use for its engineers to help one of its overseas clients install systems.

Things are changing.
Even my firm (an extremely traditional bank) is changing. Before the lockdown people were wearing suits every day, even in back office roles on dress-down Friday. Flexible working was very much the exception, not the rule.

Now, it looks like we'll be WFH 2-4 days a week when we go back, and (hopefully) those in non-client facing roles will be able to wear what they like - which I'll look forward to.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
Even my firm (an extremely traditional bank) is changing. Before the lockdown people were wearing suits every day, even in back office roles on dress-down Friday. Flexible working was very much the exception, not the rule.

Now, it looks like we'll be WFH 2-4 days a week when we go back, and (hopefully) those in non-client facing roles will be able to wear what they like - which I'll look forward to.
SWMBO was five days a week in the office, typically including a couple in London. She's been told that post-pandemic 'normal' is going to involve no more than 50 percent of the week in the office, with a presumption that if people want to work from home they won't be stopped from doing so.

As I've noted before, this is going to make my viewing habits difficult.
 
As I've noted before, this is going to make my viewing habits difficult.
I turned the spare room into a home office.

Luckily, it has a squeaky floorboard a few feet away, that SWMBO hasn't noticed.

We are going to try and co-ord our WFH days so that there's always someone here, so the dog isn't on his own / in doggy daycare.
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
Even my firm (an extremely traditional bank) is changing. Before the lockdown people were wearing suits every day, even in back office roles on dress-down Friday. Flexible working was very much the exception, not the rule.

Now, it looks like we'll be WFH 2-4 days a week when we go back, and (hopefully) those in non-client facing roles will be able to wear what they like - which I'll look forward to.


I requested a slight change to my hours as I used to arrive upto an hour before I was due to start work, to avoid the shitty traffic. I used to generally work through that extra hour, generally setting up the training room if I was training at the office or checking the laptops if I'm going to a client site.
No, you can't arrive half an hour early and leave half an hour early, you are contracted 9-5. you can't have any other hours

recently "we need you to go online from 17:00 to midnight next week for a client in America cos they are 8 hours behind us..."
"sorry, no, I'm contracted 9 - 5, I can't have any other hours"

Other companies I deal with are making the most of flexible and online working. Last week a woman on one of my courses hasn't been into her office since long before the lockdown due to maternity leave, her back to work plan had her working from home then the lockdown. They've repurposed her office as she and her management have agreed WFH is perfect for both parties.
They have cleared up dozens of parking spaces because of similar deals meaning that cars are not next to each other, easier to get into and out of cars, less chance of passing covid in the carpark.
They're also looking at their company car policy/car allowance policy as fewer people need a car full time if they can continue to work remotely.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
I turned the spare room into a home office.

Luckily, it has a squeaky floorboard a few feet away, that SWMBO hasn't noticed.

We are going to try and co-ord our WFH days so that there's always someone here, so the dog isn't on his own / in doggy daycare.
Yeah, there's only one kind of DIY I'm any good at. It's not that one.
 

kimmi851

War Hero
I have thought for some time the the answer lies in killing Road Haulage. Not totally, but ostensibly. Outrage sorry chaps, but it was originally in it’s current form a means of employment and support for our motor industry. This doesn’t exist in any meaningful form any more. There is no excuse for not shifting the majority onto the rails, where it belongs. That leaves local deliveries and wide, abnormal loads. Railheads at all major centres For warehousing.
The one freedom cars give, is the choice of when and where you travel at your convenience. More buses and trains are capital expenditure which are not attractive in the main. If one doesn’t need to travel for work, then the changes come in housing design to have a segregated work space, wheel full circle from the industrial revolution, namely lofts with work space.

My colleague and I were discussing this and she put forward we have stopped using the canal system and that could also be used as part of the haulage system alongside the trains. They were designed for working loads and are only left to silt up because there is not much use,
 
In the case of Marples the point was that he, personally, was not making a great deal of money from building railways. The company of which he was managing director was concerned in road construction. Railways were the competition.

And they say that politicians of today don't possess the integrity of their predecessors.
I'm not particularly bothered by this argument, the whole function of both Beeching and Marples was to make things pay. Don't look at things as they are today, look at them as they were then. If we were going to get cars on the road and the freedom to move as we pleased, then PT had to be sacrificed. I think I can remember half a dozen cars on our road in Cranford. Most couldn't afford them To get to school it was bus, then tube or hitching a lift from mum and then foot and she only had a car cos of preferential terms on the dealership she worked for. I believe her imp was second hand and cost £508 (1964).

Beeching's issue was that although he used flawed stats to close railways- ie mid holiday seasons excluding school kids he was forced to leave the trunk routes alone, but subsequent issues arose because the other underused cutoffs were disposed of and that was stupid, it slowed things down even then. But the proposed relief bus services never materialised in many places, there simply weren't the buses to make the investment worthwhile. Politicians in this p;articular instance have never had integrity in that sense.

Beechings biggest problem was a failure to understand that passengers don't pay for railways, freight does. His second was that you can only have so many trains on any line in any given period. There is not a constant conveyor belt of people. Put it this way at it's peak interwar on any day for the 10 AMs going north they had an average of between 6-800, sometimes fewer per train. On a city airport Flight from LCY to EDI there were maybe 50-60 passengers Max in the naughties. OK add that to LHR, that's maybe 250 people in total. The peak usage of trains going into London is between 06.00 and 0830. and similarly 16.00 to 18.30 and very late night. As a rule between those hours trains are fairly empty. Can you see which way this is going with increased home working?
 
Unless there is the wrong kind of snow or the wrong kind of tree leafs on the track then nothing will move :twisted:
Yers that came about due to the use of disc brakes AIUI. The powdery snow would compact and not aollow the callipers to work. Leaves have always been a problem with adhesion, the heavier the loco, the less of a problem subject to axle loadings. With freight it's less of a problem timings wise.
 
My colleague and I were discussing this and she put forward we have stopped using the canal system and that could also be used as part of the haulage system alongside the trains. They were designed for working loads and are only left to silt up because there is not much use,
Well I suppose it is possible. But then the historic loads like coal have gone and the average container is 40 odd foot long and that would mean bespoke barges. Time scales are not really on side unless it's Grain or something that have futures on them and there's no real point in shifting them until needed. Most of the infrastructure is going on 300 years old, new Locks needed, probably even new routes. There's certainly a use for them the question is how much.
 
Well I suppose it is possible. But then the historic loads like coal have gone and the average container is 40 odd foot long and that would mean bespoke barges. Time scales are not really on side unless it's Grain or something that have futures on them and there's no real point in shifting them until needed. Most of the infrastructure is going on 300 years old, new Locks needed, probably even new routes. There's certainly a use for them the question is how much.
This from 2002
 
@Cold_Collation Thanks for the informative post earlier. Can you expand upon this part please? Which countries are doing this and is it as simple as the windscreen tags used for toll roads?

But, back to distance-based charging. Lorries on the continent are subject to it in many countries, particularly those that are 'transit countries' i.e. those through which freight traffic travels, often without stopping to refuel. Those countries don't get any fuel tax, so instead many have put in place distance-based solutions. There are two principle ways of doing this: satellite tracking, and terrestrial gantries which use in-vehicle beacons/tags which some of you will be familiar with as they provide access control into work and other premises.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
@Cold_Collation Thanks for the informative post earlier. Can you expand upon this part please? Which countries are doing this and is it as simple as the windscreen tags used for toll roads?
A fair few. Just off the top of my head, Germany, Austria, France, Slovenia, Slovakia, Poland, Switzerland Hungary... I think that's all of them.

A few others are starting to operate clean air and congestion schemes.

And yes. It's a tag (actually, usually a hard-cased on-board unit but essentially a 'tag'.

Tag-based systems using the DSRC protocol are very reliable - that 'six nines' percent mentioned earlier. ANPR is also becoming more popular as licence plate captures are then used by both the charging and the enforcement systems (I haven't responded to the 'yes but' points about enforcement because the point is that the tolling kit works and the enforcement back-up is very good, too).
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
My colleague and I were discussing this and she put forward we have stopped using the canal system and that could also be used as part of the haulage system alongside the trains. They were designed for working loads and are only left to silt up because there is not much use,

If you don't mind things taking a while to arrive, it can be a very green solution, assuming we go back to horse drawn barges or go modern with solar powered boats
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
My colleague and I were discussing this and she put forward we have stopped using the canal system and that could also be used as part of the haulage system alongside the trains. They were designed for working loads and are only left to silt up because there is not much use,
Ah, now then.

I wrote an article on this a few years back, when there was a serious suggestion of replacing all the train lines with bus rapid transit.

Many of the mainline routes were originally canals. They were filled in and overlaid with tracks when the iron horse came along. The point being that technology and economics will drive the choice of mode.
 
Many of the mainline routes were originally canals. They were filled in and overlaid with tracks
Yers. in fact the railways bought out the canal companies, there being an element of insider dealing. i.e canal companies becoming shareholders. The canals were originally used to carry the heavier loads until the rolling stock had accumulated to the extent that the loads could be hauled, subsequently some of the routes were followed in respect of gradients already established, as boats and trains had one thing in common, they don't like going up hill
 

syrup

LE
SWMBO was five days a week in the office, typically including a couple in London. She's been told that post-pandemic 'normal' is going to involve no more than 50 percent of the week in the office, with a presumption that if people want to work from home they won't be stopped from doing so.

As I've noted before, this is going to make my viewing habits difficult.

My company has already shut an office block
They were renting the land mainly to access more parking space and some extra offices
They've said they don't envisage the whole offices being back at once so there should be more space to park etc

Then guys it will hit hardest will be the field based guys
No need for a company car or a generous expense account to host people

Most of it will be done on zoom or teams from now one
I did a site audit last week by walking round with a phone and pointing it where the auditors wanted to look so they could see over live chat.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
My company has already shut an office block
They were renting the land mainly to access more parking space and some extra offices
They've said they don't envisage the whole offices being back at once so there should be more space to park etc

Then guys it will hit hardest will be the field based guys
No need for a company car or a generous expense account to host people

Most of it will be done on zoom or teams from now one
I did a site audit last week by walking round with a phone and pointing it where the auditors wanted to look so they could see over live chat.
I've just finished an article which has highlighted the use of augmented/virtual reality for maritime inspection.
 
I think it’s a good idea, no more tax disc, no annual bill (that you can avoid) (here you can tax your car for 3/6/9/12 months at a time not sure about U.K.).

no need for a separate bill magic electronics. Just add it at the pumps
 

Latest Threads

Top