For Inspection VE group build

Right first one all done.


What... No! Bad Listy!

The VP21 is completed, along with a squad of Hitler youth tank hunters:







I'm not sure how I feel about the bases and the scatter though. Might wait until tomorrow to make a decision.
 
This restored WW2 D-Day Royal Marines Close Support Centaur Mark IV tank used to sit opposite the Pegasus Bridge Cafe next to the canal and the bridge but it has now been moved to the grounds of the Pegasus Bridge Memorial Museum on the other side of the canal along with the original bridge. It has been replaced by a bofors Anti-Aircraft gun.
View attachment 476290
'Vidette' is one of the few Centaur Mk IV close support tanks to survive the war.

Don't actually know why as none of the Centaurs that landed on D-Day made it that far. They were recalled to ship and then back to blighty. That fount of all wisdom, Wikipedia, gives us this:
"The Centaurs were not used in combat except for those fitted with a 95 mm howitzer, which were used in support of the Royal Marines during the amphibious invasion of Normandy" and also....

"In contrast, the Centaur was chiefly used for training; only those in specialist roles saw action. The Centaur IV Close Support version with a 95 mm howitzer saw service in small numbers as part of the Royal Marine Armoured Support Group on D-Day. Originally intended to serve as static pillboxes, these examples retained the engine allowing the Marines to advance the tank inland. A number of Centaurs were also re-purposed as combat engineering vehicles, such as an armoured bulldozer.
Cracking picture, what are the markings around the top of the turret for?
 

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Right first one all done.


What... No! Bad Listy!

The VP21 is completed, along with a squad of Hitler youth tank hunters:







I'm not sure how I feel about the bases and the scatter though. Might wait until tomorrow to make a decision.
They look like the cast (geddit) from JoJo Rabbit.
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Smeggers

ADC
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where I’m heading is getting a Centaur kit. Seems unfair to have a Cromwell without doing a Centaur.......

anyway. Tracks and spare links all done. There is a shit load of etch...

View attachment 476286
and the fenders arrive next week....

Not sure how much of this I’ll use yet, and I may stick the fender on the Centaur
Got a set of Accurate Armour RMASG Decals going FOC if you want them Si.
 
I know this is a Churchill, I would think any tank commander worth his salt, would stick as much extra protection on as possible. With the Germans love of 88s, I know I would have . Nice mixture of Sherman, Churchill and I think German?View attachment 476212View attachment 476212
Turret has Churchill, Glacis has Tiger, toe plate has Sherman. It's quite common to see multiple track types glued onto tanks. 6th Guards Tank Brigade usually covered their tanks with them. The Track links are welded on, like the one providing protection to the drivers hatch.
This is actually of benefit to the modern modeller, as Tank tracks can be quite hard to come by, apart from Sherman links.

Sadly they provided no additional protection.
 
More physiological, I think I’d have felt more confident with that lot stuck in front!
The story goes that the War Office carried out a study into add on armour such as tracks and its effectiveness. On the hull they found that it was neither beneficial or negative. However on the turret, it could put the turret out of balance and wear the gears, and slow turret rotation.
They also found that it provided no effect against incoming fire, what with the tracks being steel, not armour plate.

In an attack of common sense they realised they couldn't ban the practice, and even if they could, they couldn't enforce it. They then considered the morale aspect, of both its effect in the field, and the damage a ban would do to relations between the War Office and the citizen soldier.

So they left it alone.
 

offog

LE
The frost problem was sorted by a very quick squirt of hairspray from about 18in.

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Now onto the dust. Wily the Whippet has become the test bed and so looks like a bit of a patchwork. I tried some art pastels which is the red and looks very like rust. But not what I was after but may look these for other tasks. Wily has also had some different paint but again not what I wanted.

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I finished up with Tan sand from VH. From what I have read it was very hot and dry in Normandy at the time. So I wanted a dusty look as opposed to mud and as these vehicles would spent most of the time on roads you would get road dust.

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I have deliberately left the back clearer. I have noticed that the left side has more dust on it and it got me to thinking what side of the road did the army use in France.

I will leave it till tomorrow and see if I can take some of the dust off the tyres.
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
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Just started the second of the pair, I have the option of either the original Lee Enfield or an MP40, probably going for the MP40 as A) it's a better moulded option and B) it looks to be a better balanced piece with it. your thoughts?

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daz

LE
Just started the second of the pair, I have the option of either the original Lee Enfield or an MP40, probably going for the MP40 as A) it's a better moulded option and B) it looks to be a better balanced piece with it. your thoughts?
On 25 September a Lt Hardy of the R Sigs sent the last carrier pigeon of Arnhem with a short message. Point 3 of 5 was 'Now using as many German weapons as we have British...' (quoted in Chester Wilmot's book). So, the MP40 would not be wrong.
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
On 25 September a Lt Hardy of the R Sigs sent the last carrier pigeon of Arnhem with a short message. Point 3 of 5 was 'Now using as many German weapons as we have British...' (quoted in Chester Wilmot's book). So, the MP40 would not be wrong.
Exactly,that was my idea for them, to show the desperation of those last days.
 

NSP

LE
The story goes that the War Office carried out a study into add on armour such as tracks and its effectiveness. On the hull they found that it was neither beneficial or negative. However on the turret, it could put the turret out of balance and wear the gears, and slow turret rotation.
They also found that it provided no effect against incoming fire, what with the tracks being steel, not armour plate.

In an attack of common sense they realised they couldn't ban the practice, and even if they could, they couldn't enforce it. They then considered the morale aspect, of both its effect in the field, and the damage a ban would do to relations between the War Office and the citizen soldier.

So they left it alone.
I imagine track links were hardened? I can't see untempered links being much use as a wearing surface...?! As such there must have been some value vis a vis diverting energy from incoming rounds.

Digging back into my long forgotten and little-used degree in engineering I can see several advantages, on paper at least:-

AP kinetic penetrators expend energy punching through the hardened steel of the link (albeit not "armour" hardened) and expend some more in the action/reaction effect that generates that effect you see in slo-mo film of tests that flings the track away from the hull. The track and it's reactive motion may also disrupt the path of the round, using up more energy and changing the round aspect with respect to course. Equals less penetrative energy for the main armour and the chance of a full or vehicle-saving partial deflection.

AP exploding rounds initiate before penetrating the main armour, reducing their penetrative and spalling effects.

Shaped charge and explosively-formed penetrators such as panzerfaust initiate on impact with the track and when they burn through the link and hit the harder armour there is a splash effect, which flings the track off and consumes energy, reducing the penetrative effect on the main armour - when the copper jet burns through the link and hits the (admittedly tiny) air gap between the track and the main hull/turret armour and "splashes" against the harder main armour, having lost energy and shape penetrating the link.

It's like a very early attempt at doing what ERA does but without the E, almost. Oh, and without the level of effectiveness - but in a few cases some vital effectiveness nonetheless.

Of course, the physical reality may - as it often proves - be somewhat different to the paper theory.

Oh - and there's always the possibility that crews just did it for allyness...!

How were track links attached? In the Churchill book I've got they appear to be fitted in purpose-built racks as true spares.
 
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NSP

LE
I have deliberately left the back clearer. I have noticed that the left side has more dust on it and it got me to thinking what side of the road did the army use in France.
These are apparently of British forces advancing through France and Belgium in 1944:-





Seems we might have picked and chosen as it fancied the formation at the time. Although given the number of Spam and Canuck units (and Free French) involved you'd think we'd default to the wrong side of the road to suit them and the locals.
 
I imagine track links were hardened? I can't see untempered links being much use as a wearing surface...?! As such there must have been some value vis a vis diverting energy from incoming rounds.

Digging back into my long forgotten and little-used degree in engineering I can see several advantages, on paper at least:-

AP kinetic penetrators expend energy punching through the hardened steel of the link (albeit not "armour" hardened) and expend some more in the action/reaction effect that generates that effect you see in slo-mo film of tests that flings the track away from the hull. The track and it's reactive motion may also disrupt the path of the round, using up more energy and changing the round aspect with respect to course. Equals less penetrative energy for the main armour and the chance of a full or vehicle-saving partial deflection.

AP exploding rounds initiate before penetrating the main armour, reducing their penetrative and spalling effects.

Shaped charge and explosively-formed penetrators such as panzerfaust initiate on impact with the track and when they burn through the link and hit the harder armour there is a splash effect, which flings the track off and consumes energy, reducing the penetrative effect on the main armour - when the copper jet burns through the link and hits the (admittedly tiny) air gap between the track and the main hull/turret armour and "splashes" against the harder main armour, having lost energy and shape penetrating the link.

It's like a very early attempt at doing what ERA does but without the E, almost. Oh, and without the level of effectiveness - but in a few cases some vital effectiveness nonetheless.
Well first of all you have to consider the time to face harden. Then how much wear is going to happen around the track pins, and how quickly the track links will need to be replaced from that. I suspect the track pins and the like are actually what fails first on tracks. So throwing them out fast and cheap is better than over engineering. Mild Steel is really crap for stopping projectiles.

We found that out when Germans were strafing our coastal shipping early in the war.
Armour plate wasn't an option due to its rarity and scarcity (another reason why we don't armour tracks). MS just let the bullets through with any practicable amount of Weight. Concrete would shatter adding to the volume of shrapnel behind the slab, and was also bloody heavy.

The Stand off achieved using track-links agaisnt chemical energy shot is so small as to be negligible.

How were track links attached? In the Churchill book I've got they appear to be fitted in purpose-built racks as true spares.
Spares or protection? Spares would have been in racks or otherwise attatched so they can be freed. Protection was usually attatched however the crew could. In the case of Tracklinks on the Churchill's they were usually welded in place.
 

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