For Inspection VE group build

Both sets of tracks on. Must say glad to be back on armour and cast tracks make a tank

E042ED59-FA63-4D8E-95E9-FE1F9165CC68.jpeg
 

offog

LE
Ooops!!

IMG_20200524_204229572.jpg


IMG_20200524_204237585.jpg


I've tried this hair spray thing and it went exceedingly well, not. I may have overdone it a bit.

Nice frost.

We will see how it is in he morning. I tried to move the stars but they are on for good although on checking I have found that not all the Canadians put the stars on at an angle.

IMG_20200524_204434549.jpg


I did a test on the Whippet and it went well getting rid of the white I put on by using old matt varnish. this has now become the test bed and I have been dropping the pressure on the airbrush to 10 and holding it a lot closer.
 

offog

LE
Your google foo is a lot better than mine.

That gunner one looks interesting.
 

Smeggers

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Ooops!!

View attachment 476164

View attachment 476165

I've tried this hair spray thing and it went exceedingly well, not. I may have overdone it a bit.

Nice frost.

We will see how it is in he morning. I tried to move the stars but they are on for good although on checking I have found that not all the Canadians put the stars on at an angle.

View attachment 476167

I did a test on the Whippet and it went well getting rid of the white I put on by using old matt varnish. this has now become the test bed and I have been dropping the pressure on the airbrush to 10 and holding it a lot closer.
My Bold:
Taken from: https://www.canadiansoldiers.com/vehicles/markings/vehiclem…
National Identification

Recognition markings were used to identify vehicles to friendly forces, especially aircraft. Canadian armoured vehicles in the United Kingdom used a red/white/red recognition flash which was a holdover from the First World War. The 14th Canadian Tank Regiment (The Calgary Regiment) used this style of recognition mark on its vehicles at Dieppe, and Canadian AFVs in the Mediterranean also commonly employed this style of AFV recognition marking.

In 1942, rondels were to be painted on all other vehicles, of the same type used by Royal Air Force and Royal Canadian Air Force aircraft, usually located on the hood.


By June 1944, all Allied vehicles going into Northwest Europe were to have the five pointed American star painted on them instead. These stars sometimes had a circle, either broken or unbroken, painted around them as well. Canadian units often painted the star on crooked in order to differentiate themselves from American units.




ford3ton.jpg

Ford 3 Tonner exploring a Dutch nose first! Note the allied star.​
 

offog

LE
Yes I read that page and noted the "often" bit which is why I put "not all".

Come the next one it will be at an angle. :D
 

Smeggers

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Yes I read that page and noted the "often" bit which is why I put "not all".

Come the next one it will be at an angle. :D
Perfectly correct old boy, well spotted
 

offog

LE
Is that a 95mm gun?

Cromwell relied on speed and size for protection unless it tea time.
 
Is that a 95mm gun?

Cromwell relied on speed and size for protection unless it tea time.
Standard mkVll had a 75mm gun, but close support one had a 3in/95mm howitzer.
Incidentally the one you liked with the strange turret markings was originally a Royal Marine Close Support Group.
 

Smeggers

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But what about the frost!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Frost looks good, but if the windscreen is clear, the bonnet would also be devoid of it! Load area at rear would also have some signs of it. Hope that helps.
 
Standard mkVll had a 75mm gun, but close support one had a 3in/95mm howitzer.
Incidentally the one you liked with the strange turret markings was originally a Royal Marine Close Support Group.
There was a Centaur (up engined Cromwell with the marked up Close Support turret) as a memorial at Pegasus Bridge. I don't know if it is still there.
 
There was a Centaur (up engined Cromwell with the marked up Close Support turret) as a memorial at Pegasus Bridge. I don't know if it is still there.
where I’m heading is getting a Centaur kit. Seems unfair to have a Cromwell without doing a Centaur.......

anyway. Tracks and spare links all done. There is a shit load of etch...

C3056119-AA61-403D-BD12-F24F522B3C10.jpeg

and the fenders arrive next week....

Not sure how much of this I’ll use yet, and I may stick the fender on the Centaur
 

Smeggers

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There was a Centaur (up engined Cromwell with the marked up Close Support turret) as a memorial at Pegasus Bridge. I don't know if it is still there.
This restored WW2 D-Day Royal Marines Close Support Centaur Mark IV tank used to sit opposite the Pegasus Bridge Cafe next to the canal and the bridge but it has now been moved to the grounds of the Pegasus Bridge Memorial Museum on the other side of the canal along with the original bridge. It has been replaced by a bofors Anti-Aircraft gun.
centaur-tank.jpg

'Vidette' is one of the few Centaur Mk IV close support tanks to survive the war.

Don't actually know why as none of the Centaurs that landed on D-Day made it that far. They were recalled to ship and then back to blighty. That fount of all wisdom, Wikipedia, gives us this:
"The Centaurs were not used in combat except for those fitted with a 95 mm howitzer, which were used in support of the Royal Marines during the amphibious invasion of Normandy" and also....

"In contrast, the Centaur was chiefly used for training; only those in specialist roles saw action. The Centaur IV Close Support version with a 95 mm howitzer saw service in small numbers as part of the Royal Marine Armoured Support Group on D-Day. Originally intended to serve as static pillboxes, these examples retained the engine allowing the Marines to advance the tank inland. A number of Centaurs were also re-purposed as combat engineering vehicles, such as an armoured bulldozer.
 

offog

LE
Frost looks good, but if the windscreen is clear, the bonnet would also be devoid of it! Load area at rear would also have some signs of it. Hope that helps.
You misunderstand. The frost was due to the use of hairspray and me being overenthusiastic in its use. How do I get rid of the white stuff besides snorting it or making bread.

I haven't put the window in yet that's why they are so clean.
 

Smeggers

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You misunderstand. The frost was due to the use of hairspray and me being overenthusiastic in its use. How do I get rid of the white stuff besides snorting it or making bread.

I haven't put the window in yet that's why they are so clean.
That's the trouble with old age, senility creeps in. Have you tried over painting it with a wash of Olive Drab followed by a wash of Black. If that doesn't work, try matt varnish prior to applying the washes.
Putting in Windows can be a pain in the butt! I usually put them in using PVA glue and leave overnight. Once the blue has dried clear, apply plastic cement and allow capillary action to let it flow into the joins.
 

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