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VE Day and the lockdown

How will you be spending/marking the 75th anniversary of VE Day bearing in mind the current lockdown? There were obviously very very many street parties and other celebrations planned before Covid-19 hit but people are nothing if not inventive.

We are all going to have a front garden BBQ/Piss up with every 3rd or so house tuning into a radio station so that music can also be played, some will join in with whatever instrument they can play along with as and when the mood takes them and I'm sure a good time will be had by all, bunting and whatever will be strung up where possible and some I'm sure will be in fancy dress.

It isn't quite what anyone could have imagined or planned for the day to be but everyone will be making the best of a bad job and I'm sure that everyone around the country will enjoy it all nonetheless, bearing in mind social distancing it might even prevent the odd punch up later in the evening (or maybe not depending on your area)

However your planning on spending it have a great time and enjoy the chance to have a good laugh and fun in these troubling times
 
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Street garden party at 2pm to 6pm in the local area with a DJ around the corner. Small band walking around a few streets playing Dambusters etc. Supposed to piss down tomorrow at some stage though.
 
I'm remembering my Dad. He never spoke about it.

He kept a book beside his bed which he'd omitted to return to the Padua Military Library. I picked it up last night and found he'd marked an extract which must have resonated with him in the aftermath of WWII. It's pretty appropriate reading it now.

Below is the text, plus a pic of my Dad in Schio, Veneto and the Red Hackle he got on VE Day 1945 when he did a swap with a Black Watch Major during the celebrations. He gave it to me years ago and told me to stick it in my pocket on Remembrance Day in memory of those who didn't make it home. Dad walked out of school aged 17 to sign up in 1943, finally came home 1948 and was a reservist until 1955. Thanks Dad. Wish I had asked you about it.


Hard to Find the Best.jpg
Dad Schio Italy 1946.jpg
VE Day Red Hackle.jpg
 
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Turn on, tune in...
 

Yokel

LE
I will be remembering my late Grandfather who sadly died when I was seven or eight - a Gunner in the RN throughout the War, also my late Uncle, a Flight Engineer in the RAF who served with Bomber and Coastal Commands.

I will be thinking of their fellow Sailors and Airmen who did not make it, and the quiet heroes who survived the war and got on with their lives.

Not so much a celebration as a quiet reflection.

Memor Es Tuorum - Be mindful of your ancestors.
 
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BratMedic

LE
Book Reviewer
The route of the flypast, Take off is approx 1200hrs but timings are not specific.
1. Waterlooville
The plane will take off from Goodwood and fly west over Wellington Care Home in Waterlooville.

Thomas Hyom, who served as a Loading Seaman in the Royal Navy during the Second World War, is one 60 residents at the home and recently celebrated his 102nd birthday.

2. Bracknell
It will then head North to Bracknell to honour 98-year-old Squadron Leader Stanley Booker, who was reportedly shot down over France in 1944 and imprisoned in Buchenwald Concentration Camp.

3. Hyde Heath
Flying further north, the Spitfire will pass over Rayners Care Home in Hyde Heath.

All 44 residents are reportedly from the wartime generation, including three centenarians.

4. Mareston Moretaine
The Spitfire will reach its most northern point with a flyover Colonel Tom Moore's home.

The 100-year-old veteran has raised more than £33 million for NHS charities by walking laps of his garden.


5. Horton Kirby
It will then move towards the South East, flying over London and towards Horton Kirby, a short distance from Dartford.

There lives 98-year-old Leading Aircraftman Dennis Hanigan who served in the RAF during the Second World War.

6. Maidstone
The Spitfire will continue in the same direction towards Maidstone.

Sapper George Bates, 94, is a veteran from D-Day, who reportedly landed on Gold Beach and spent five days clearing landmines.

7. East Grinstead
The SM520 will then fly across the county towards East Grinstead and could pass over Tonbridge.

This location was chosen by Daily Mail readers to honour Queen Victoria Hospital, which treated injured pilots during the war.

8. East Sussex
It will then drop down in the direction of Eastbourne towrds the East Sussex coastline.

This is to honour local resident Dame Vera Lynn, the 103-year-old known as the 'Forces' Sweetheart'.

9. Ovingdean
The Spitfire will move west along the coast over the centre for Blind Veterans UK.

It was built in the shape of an aircraft and is currently home to several centenarians.

10. Worthing
It will continue west to honour Care for Verterans in Worthing.

The charity provides nursing care and rehabilitation to physically disabled veterans.

11. Petworth
The Spitfire will finally fly over Petworth before returning to base at Goodwood.

It will honour Lieutenant Michael de Burgh, who served as a tank commander in the Second World War.
 

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer
This may seem pertinent. I just think its funny in a way. Years old though.

My Uncle Freddy received the following from one of his former comrades.

Dear Freddy,
I hope this finds you well and your leg is on the mend. You were greatly missed at the last Old and Bold dinner, which turned out to be a most remarkable occasion.
Our table included a female who was still serving.
At first everything seemed pretty congenial then someone asked Tommy Bell about the Norway campaign. You remember Tommy, lost his toes to frostbite at Steinkjer. Well, no sooner had he begun talking about the difficulty of moving on the ground because of snow and ice and German air supremacy, than this lady told him that that was nothing, she’d done an Arctic Warfare course.
She described every detail and it seemed interminable but finally she needed to breathe so Dick and Trevor started to compare notes on their treatment as guests of the Japanese and the Communist Chinese. They mentioned interrogation and Zena the Ice Warrior Princess took the cue, Apparently she had done an interrogation course and was told that it was tougher than the real thing, so we all got our ears chewed off a second time.
Eventually Dick mumbled something about it possibly not being quite the same thing and Trevor was clearly a bit upset so ‘Stinker’ Cartwright tried to defuse the situation by mentioning Arnhem and told his joke about the difficulty of having a crap at the Hartenstein Hotel – the one that ends, ‘I don’t mean my first visit, I’m talking about the trip last year.’ I know it wasn’t even funny the first time but poor old ‘Stinker’ didn’t get as far as the punchline. She rounded on him and told him straight up that women could poo anywhere men could. Not only that, it was no reason to keep women out of the infantry. She offered to poo on the spot if we didn’t believe her – at which point ‘Stinker’ lost his thread and the Beef Wellington lost its appeal.
That should have been the end of it but old Bill Gollings heard ‘women’ in the infantry’ and remarked that, as a veteran of Kohima, he was not in favour. I’m surprised Bill heard anything as he’s been pretty deaf on that side since being hit by that Jap rifle butt. She told him in pretty short order that she’d never heard of Kohima and there was no such thing as hand to hand combat but perhaps he’d heard of Afghanistan and did he have any idea? Poor old Bill tried to explain about the tennis court but she brushed him aside and told him that it couldn’t have been much of a fight if they had time to play tennis. She then offered her opinion that asymetrical warfare was far tougher than any other sort of warfare while Tommy gripped the edge of the table til his knuckles turned white and ‘Stinker’ eyed the butter knife with increasing intensity. Ninety or not, once a Para…
Laurie Styles, you remember Laurie, got the MC on Longstop and should have got another one after Merville, gently suggested that women were possibly not best suited to the intense physical nature of infanteering, and referred to the particular intensity of ‘dig or die’ during the Normandy Campaign. No sooner were the words out of his mouth than he was wishing himself back at the Bois du Mont. Apparently he was a dinosaur and what the **** did he know? I don’t know what’s going on in Afghanistan, though Reg Fisher’s daughter is out there at the moment, but to hear her tell it, it’s a wonder anyone’s still alive.
I tell you Freddy, it didn’t matter what anyone had done, she knew better and had done the course. I’ve not heard such a love of the first person singular since Corporal Rimmer two-shedded everyone all the way from Salerno to the Gothic Line until someone shut him up with an adjustable spanner. Sadly, the dinner was not a REME do.
It was remorseless. Do you remember the time we took on a Tiger and the damn thing rolled on and on wreaking havoc until Corporal Thompson finally got a lucky track shot with the Six Pounder? Well it was just like that, but without Corporal Thompson or the Six Pounder.
All the best and see you next year if the Good Lord spares us.

Yours Aye,
Roger
 
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<Checks NAFFI>

I am going to hurl my one rationed egg at a couple of nancy boys (ex RN Corvette officers) who live together down the road and hound them out of the village; spit at the West Indian bus driver (ex RAF air gunner) and refuse to let my shed to him, call out that Wanton Hussey (ex FANY) who is up the duff to an American and demand she goes to a 'home' in Ireland, having brought shame on the whole street; de-skill my wife who did something with valves at the GPO Research Station at Bletchley Park (or wherever) and get her perpetually pregnant and give her a good slapping every so often; go back to my Victorian Engineering Works, with its Victorian management attitudes and laugh at old Bill (old Contemptable) who works in the dispatch office, having had his arm ripped off by one of the overhead drive belts; send my son (who passed his 11 Plus) down't pit at 14 as more school is a waste of time; vote for Mr Churchill and his desire that the Empire should last for 1000 years (quite different from Hitler and his 1000 year Reich), even though the country is bankrupt and the Indians are getting uppity; send more troops to sort out the Jew Boys and Arabs in Palestine (the Jews did bring a lot of what happened on to themselves, you know); spend my spare time at the Institute drinking and smoking or at the allotment, drinking and smoking; wear the same shirt for a week just changing collars and cuffs; look forward to my Saturday night bath in from of the kitchen range....

Whilst we quite rightly celebrate the end of the (European) War and commemorate the Greatest Generation, we should also avoid getting too sentimental and misty-eyed about it. Pre-war attitudes remained: anti-Semitism and racism were rampart; women were expected to return to domestic roles (and certainly stop work if they married); unmarried Mums were 'sent away'; Gays who had had illustrious careers in the Services were now hunted down, dismissed and prosecuted; industrial relations were abysmal, massive under-investment in industry; Colonialism was expected to continue; education expectations were low; most houses did not have indoor plumbing...

I think we should celebrate how much Britain has changed for the better.
 
Just watched the Red Arrows flying over London. Apparently there was no advanced publicity as there were concerns that many would ignore lockdown restrictions and congregate in large numbers around the Thames.
The TV coverage didn’t show any evidence of crowds, but concentrated on the fly past. As ever, it was an awesome sight.
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
I remember the 50th Anniversary in 1995. My local pub had organised a BarBCue and I was the designated Chef. However it was pissing down. No matter says we, Barbie fired up and cooking commenced as planned with one guy holding an umbrella over the Barbie, one holding a brolly over me, not very successfully, beer being brought out regularly from the bar.

A great day was had despite the rain, people fed as planned but eaten in the bar instead of outdoors. Great day, ended up soaked both outside and in! Proper celebration!
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
<Checks NAFFI>

I am going to hurl my one rationed egg at a couple of nancy boys (ex RN Corvette officers) who live together down the road and hound them out of the village; spit at the West Indian bus driver (ex RAF air gunner) and refuse to let my shed to him, call out that Wanton Hussey (ex FANY) who is up the duff to an American and demand she goes to a 'home' in Ireland, having brought shame on the whole street; de-skill my wife who did something with valves at the GPO Research Station at Bletchley Park (or wherever) and get her perpetually pregnant and give her a good slapping every so often; go back to my Victorian Engineering Works, with its Victorian management attitudes and laugh at old Bill (old Contemptable) who works in the dispatch office, having had his arm ripped off by one of the overhead drive belts; send my son (who passed his 11 Plus) down't pit at 14 as more school is a waste of time; vote for Mr Churchill and his desire that the Empire should last for 1000 years (quite different from Hitler and his 1000 year Reich), even though the country is bankrupt and the Indians are getting uppity; send more troops to sort out the Jew Boys and Arabs in Palestine (the Jews did bring a lot of what happened on to themselves, you know); spend my spare time at the Institute drinking and smoking or at the allotment, drinking and smoking; wear the same shirt for a week just changing collars and cuffs; look forward to my Saturday night bath in from of the kitchen range....

Whilst we quite rightly celebrate the end of the (European) War and commemorate the Greatest Generation, we should also avoid getting too sentimental and misty-eyed about it. Pre-war attitudes remained: anti-Semitism and racism were rampart; women were expected to return to domestic roles (and certainly stop work if they married); unmarried Mums were 'sent away'; Gays who had had illustrious careers in the Services were now hunted down, dismissed and prosecuted; industrial relations were abysmal, massive under-investment in industry; Colonialism was expected to continue; education expectations were low; most houses did not have indoor plumbing...

I think we should celebrate how much Britain has changed for the better.
Cheerful bugger ain't you? I take it you are not a member of the Labour Party as you would not get away with those sentiments! ;)
 
Just watched the Red Arrows flying over London. Apparently there was no advanced publicity as there were concerns that many would ignore lockdown restrictions and congregate in large numbers around the Thames.
The TV coverage didn’t show any evidence of crowds, but concentrated on the fly past. As ever, it was an awesome sight.

I watched them go overhead as well, completely unexpected as you say, so much more enjoyable I thought
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Roll on VC Day - Victory over Covid Day! :)
 
Pubs up an down the country would be packed, parades in high streets. I think there would have been a really good atmosphere. Real shame that VE is in lockdown, nothing we an do.
 

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