VC Citations - help needed

Discussion in 'Professionally Qualified, RAMC and QARANC' started by its_been_emotional, Feb 26, 2009.

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  1. Hi

    I'm trying to get hold of (preferably an electronic) copy of the VC citations for the RAMC. The ones I'm after, have a picture of the event and a brief version of the citation.

    I've got the VC RAMC book on a CD but that's 119 pages long with some citations reaching to 3 or 4 pages.

    I'm hoping to get them framed and put on a wall - obviously the 119 page version isn't suitable for that.

    If all else fails I could do it all by hand myself (as in condense the citations down) but, well, economy of effort and all that ... (and bare faced too-much-to-do-in-too-little-time as well)

    Does anyone know where I can get a copy?

    Thanks very much in advance,

    Regards,
    IBE
     
  2. Have you tried the museam at Keogh?
     
  3. Yes, they only have the 119 page "full" VC book.
     
  4. Capt Noel Godfrey Chavasse, VC and Bar, MC, RAMC

    VC Citation

    During an attack he tended the wounded in the open all day, under heavy fire, frequently in view of the enemy. During the ensuing night he searched for wounded on the ground in front of the enemy's lines for four hours. Next day he took one stretcher-bearer to the advanced trenches, and, under heavy fire, carried an urgent case for 500 yards into safety, being wounded in the side by a shell splinter during the journey. The same night he took up a party of trusty volunteers, rescued three wounded men from a shell hole twenty five yards from the enemy's trench, buried the bodies of two officers and collected many identity discs, although fired on by bombs and machine guns. Altogether he saved the lives of some twenty badly wounded men, besides the ordinary cases which passed through his hands. His courage and self-sacrifice were beyond praise.

    Bar Citation

    Though severely wounded early in the action whilst carrying a wounded soldier to the dressing station, he refused to leave his post, and for two days, not only continued to perform his duties, but in addition, went out repeatedly under heavy fire to search for and attend to the wounded who were lying out. During these searches, although practically without food during this period, worn with fatigue and faint with his wound, he assisted to carry an number of badly wounded men over heavy and difficult ground. By his extraordinary energy and inspiring example was instrumental in rescuing many wounded who would have otherwise undoubtedly succumbed under the bad weather conditions. This devoted and gallant officer subsequently died of his wounds.

    http://www.chavasse.u-net.com/chavasse.html
     
  5. Try www.gazettes-online.co.uk for the London Gazette. I don't think there's a charge and there's guidance for historians and first time users etc
     
  6. SURGEON GENERAL SIR OWEN EDWARD PENNIFATHER LLOYD

    VC HCB LRCS LRCP LM

    6th Jan


    On this day in January 1893, Surgeon General Sir Owen Edward Pennifather Lloyd VC HCB LRCS LRCP LM was awarded the Victoria Cross.

    “During the attack on the Siva Post by Kachins, on the 6th Jan 1893, Surgeon Major Lloyd, on hearing that the Commanding Officer, Capt Morton (who had left the fort to visit a picket about eight years distance) was wounded, at once ran out to his assistance under a close and heavy fire, accompanied by Subador Major Singh. On reaching the wounded officer, Surgeon Major Lloyd sent Subador Major Singh back for further assistance and remained with Captain Morton till the Subador returned with five men of the Magwe Battalion of Military Police, when he assisted in carrying Captain Morton back to the fort, where the officer died a few minutes afterwards. The enemy were within ten or fifteen paces, keeping up heavy fire, which killed three men of the picket and also Bugler Purna Singh. This man accompanied Capt Morton from the fort, showed great gallantry in supporting him in his arms when wounded and was shot while helping to carry him back to the fort. He took command of the fort after the death of Captain Morton, Officer Commanding.



    BRIGADE SURGEON LIEUTENANT COLONEL

    JAMES HENRY REYNOLDS VC BA MB ChB Hon FRCPI

    22-23 Jan

    On this day in January 1879, Brigade Surgeon Lieutenant Colonel James Henry Reynolds VC BA MB ChB Hon FRCPI was awarded his Victoria Cross. His citation:

    “For the conspicuous bravery during the attack at Rorke’s Drift, on the 22nd and 23rd January 1879, which he exhibited in his constant attention to the wounded under fire, and in his voluntarily conveying ammunition from the store to the defenders of the hospital, whereby he exposed himself to a cross-fire from the enemy both in going and returning.


    LANCE CORPORAL HENRY ERIC HARDEN VC

    23 Jan

    On this day in January 1945, Lance Corporal Henry Eric Harden VC was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross.

    On the morning of 23rd January 1945 the ‘A’ Troop to which LCpl Harden was attached was ordered to attach the railway station at the village of Brachterbeck in Holland. Whilst moving towards that objective, one Section of the Troop was caught in the open by heavy machine gun fire, followed by mortar and artillery. Three marines fell wounded and Harden ran across the 100 yards of open ground, gave his comrades first aid and carrying one marine on his back, and brought him to safety. Harden was slightly wounded in this act, but he insisted upon going out again to rescue the others. With two stretcher bearers, another casualty was brought out, but was hit again and killed. The NCO and the stretcher bearers then returned to collect the third injured man and in so doing LCpl Harden was killed. The remainder of the stretcher party reached safety. The Victoria Cross citation read:

    “The magnificent example he set of cool courage and determination
    to continue with his work whatever the odds was an inspiration to
    his comrades and will never be forgotten by those who saw it.”




    LIEUTENANT COLONEL ARTHUR MARTIN-LEAKE

    VC AND BAR LRCP FRCS

    8 Feb


    On this day in February 1902, Lieutenant Colonel Arthur Martin-Leake VC and Bar, LRCP, FRCS, was awarded the Victoria Cross.

    “For great devotion to duty and self-sacrifice to Vlakfontein, 8 Feb 1902, when he went out into the firing-line to dress a wounded man under very heavy fire from about forty Boers only 100 yards off. When he had done all he could for him, he went over to a badly wounded officer and while trying to place him in a more comfortable position, he was shot about three times. He only gave up when thoroughly exhausted and t hen he refused water until other wounded men had been served.”




    COLONEL EDGAR THOMAS INKSON VC DSO MRCS LRCP

    24 Feb

    On this day in February 1900, Colonel Edgar Thomas Inkson VC DSO MRCS LRCP was awarded the Victoria Cross.

    “On the 24th February 1900, Lieutenant Inkson carried 2nd Lieutenant Devenish (who was severely wounded and unable to walk) for three to four hundred yards, under a very heavy fire, to a place of safety. The ground over which Lieutenant Inkson had to move was much exposed, there being no cover available”.







    LANCE CORPORAL JOHN JOSEPH FARMER VC

    27 Feb

    On this day in February 181, Lance Corporal John Joseph Farmer VC was awarded the Victoria Cross. His citation reads:

    “For conspicuous bravery during the engagements with the Boers at the Majuba Mountain when he showed a spirit of self-abnegation and an example of cool courage which cannot be too highly commended. While the Boers closed with the British troops near the Wells, Cpl Farmer held a white flag over the wounded and when the arm holding the flag was shot through he called out that he had “another”. He then raised the f lag with the other arm and continued to do so until that one also was shot through”.










    MAJOR GENERAL WILLIAM HENRY SYNDER NICKERSON

    VC CB CMG MB CLB DPH

    20 Apr

    On this day in April 1900, Major General William Henry Snyder Nickerson VC CB CMG QHS MB ChB DPH was awarded the Victoria Cross.

    The citation reads:

    “At Wakkerstroom on the evening of 20th April 1900, during the advance of the infantry to support the mounted troops, Lieutenant Nickerson when in a most gallant manner, under a heavy shell and rife fire, to attend a wounded man, dressed his wounds and remained with him until he had him conveyed to a place of safety”.


    SURGEON ENERAL WILLIAM GEORGE NICHOLAS MANLEY

    VC CB MRCS

    29 Apr

    On this day in April 1984, Surgeon General William George Nicholas Manley VC CB MRCS was awarded the Victoria Cross.

    “For his conduct during the assault on the Rebel Pah, near Tauranga, New Zealand on April 29th in most nobly risking his own life according to the testimony of Commodore Sir William Wiseman Bart CB, in his endeavour to save that of the late Commander Hay of the Royal Navy and others. Having volunteered to accompany the storming party in the Pah, at attended on that officer when he was carried away mortally wounded and then volunteered to return in order to see if he could find any more wounded. It is stated that he was one of the laster officers to leave Pah”.


    LIEUTENANT COLONEL FERDINAND SIMEON Le QUENSNE

    VC MRCS LRCP LSA

    4 May

    On this day in May 1889, Lieutenant Colonel Ferdinand Simeon Le Quensne VC MRCS LRCP LSA was awarded the Victoria Cross.

    “Displayed conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty during the attack on the village of Tartan, by a column of the Chin Field Forces on the 4th May 1889 in having remained for the space of about ten minutes in a very exposed position (within five yards of the loopholed stockade from which the enemy were firing), dressing with perfect coolness and self possession the wounds from which Second Lieutenant Michel, Norfolk Regt, shortly afterwards died. Surgeon Le Quensne was himself severely wounded later whilst attending to the wounds of another officer”.


    MAJOR GENERAL HENRY EDWARD MANING DOUGLAS

    VC CB CMB DSO LRCP & S LRFP & S FRGS

    7 May

    On this day in May 1867, Major General Henry Edward Manning Douglas VC CB CMB DSO LRCP & S LRFT & S FRGS was awarded the Victoria Cross.

    “For the gallant and daring manner in which they risked their lives in manning a boat and proceeding through a dangerous surf to rescue some of their comrades who formed part of an expedition which had been sent to the Island of Andaman, by order of the Chief Commissioner of British Burmah, with a view of ascertaining the fate of the commander and seven of the crew of the ship Assam Valley, who had landed there and were supposed to have been murdered by the natives. The officer who commanded the troops on the occasion reports: ‘About an hour later in the day, Dr. Douglas, 2nd Bsttn, 24th Regt., and the four privates referred to, gallantly manning the second gig, made their way through the surf almost to the shore, but finding their boat was half filled with water, they retired. A second attempt made by Dr. Douglas and party proved successful, five of us being safely passed through the surf to the boats outside. A third and last trip got the whole of the party left on shore safe to the boats. It is stated that Dr. Douglas accomplished the bows of the boat and worked here in an intrepid and businesslike manner, cool to a degree, as if what he was then doing was an ordinary act of everyday life. The four privates behaved in an equally cool and collected manner, rowing through the roughest surf, when the slightest hesitation or want of pluck on the part of any of them would have been attended by the gravest results. It is reported that seventeen officers and men were thus saved from what must have been a fearful risk, if not certainly death”.


    CAPTAIN JOHN LESLIE GREEN VC MRCS LRCP

    1 Jul

    On this day in July 1916, Captain John Leslie Green VC MRCS LRCP was awarded the Victoria Cross.

    “For most conspicuous devotion to duty. Although himself wounded, he went to the assistance of an officer who had been wounded and was hung up in the enemy’s wire entanglements and succeeded in dragging him to a shell-hole, where he dressed his wounds, notwithstanding that bombs and rifle grenades were thrown at him the whole time. Capt Green then endeavoured to bring the wounded officer into safe cover and had nearly succeeded in doing so when he was himself killed.”


    CAPTAIN HAROLD ACKROYD VC MC MA MD

    31 Jul

    On this day in July 1917, Captain Harold Ackroyd VC MC MA MD was awarded the Victoria Cross.

    “For the most conspicuous bravery. During recent operations, Captain Ackroyd displaced the greatest gallantry and devotion to duty. Utterly regardless of danger, he worked continuously for many hours up and down in front of the line, tending the wounded and saving the lives of officers and men. In doing so, he had to move across the open under heavy machine-gun, rifle and shell fire. He carried a wounded officer to a place of safety under very heavy fire. On another occasion, he went some way in front of our advanced line and brought in a wounded man under continuous sniping and machine-gun fire. His heroism was the means of saving many lives and proved a magnificent example of courage, cheerfulness and determination to the fighting men in whose midst he was carrying out his splendid work. This gallant officer has since been killed in action”.

    CAPTAIN NOEL GODFREY CHAVASSE

    VC AND BAR MC MA MB Bch

    9 Aug 1916 Bar 31 Jul -2Aug 1917

    On this day in August 1917, Captain Noel Godfrey Chavasse VC and Bar MC MA MB Bch was awarded the bar to the Victoria Cross.

    “His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the award of a Bar to the Victoria Cross to Captain Noel Godfrey Chavasse VC MC late RAMC attached Liverpool Regt. Though severely wounded early in the action whilst carrying a wounded soldier to the dressing station, he refused to leave his post and for two days, not only continued to perform his duties, but in addition went out repeatedly under heavy fire to search for and attend to the wounded who were lying out. During these searches, although practically without food during this period, worn with fatigue and faint with his wound, he assisted to carry in a number of badly wounded men over heavy and difficult ground. By his extraordinary energy and inspiring example, he was instrumental in rescuing many wounded who would have otherwise undoubtedly succumbed under the bad weather conditions. This devoted and gallant officer subsequently died of his wounds”.




    MAJOR WILLIAM BARNSLEY ALLEN

    VC DSO MC AND BAR MB ChB

    Mentioned in Despatches September and October 1916

    3 Sep

    On this day in September 1916, Major William Barnsley Allen VC DSO MC and Bar MB ChB was awarded the Victoria Cross.

    “Date of Bravery 3 September 1916. For most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty. When gun detachments were unloading high-explosive ammunition from wagons which had just come up, the enemy suddenly began to shell the battery position. The first shell fell on one of the limbers, exploded the ammunition and caused several casualties. Capt Allen saw the occurrence and at once, with utter disregard of danger, ran straight across the open, under heavy shell fire, commenced dressing the wounded and undoubtedly by his promptness, saved many of them from bleeding to death. He was himself hit four times during the first hour by pieces of shells, one of which fractured two of his ribs, but he never even mentioned this at the time and coolly went on with his work till the last man was dressed and safely removed. He then went over to another battery and tended a wounded officer. It was only when this was done that he returned to his dug-out and reported his own injury”.




    SURGEON MAJOR THOMAS EGERTON HALE

    VC CB BA MD MRCS FRGS FRHistS JP

    8Sep

    On this day in September 1855, Surgeon Major Thomas Egerton Hale VC CB BA MRCS FRGS FRHistS JP was awarded the Victoria Cross.

    “Date of Acts of Bravery: 8 September 1855. One for remaining with an officer who was dangerously wounded (Capt H M Jones 5th Regt) in the fifth parallel on 8 Sept 1855, when all the men in the immediate neighbourhood retreated, excepting Lieut W Hope and Dr. Hale; and for endeavouring to rally the men, in conjunction with Lieut W Hope 7th Regt, The Royal Fusiliers. Two for having on 8 Sept 1855, after the regiment had retired into the trenches, cleared the most advanced sap of the wounded and carried into the sap, under a heavy fire, several wounded men from the open ground, being assisted by Sgt Charles Fisher, 7th Regt, The Royal Fusiliers”.





    ASSISTANT SURGEON HENRY THOMAS SYLVESTER

    VC MD LRCS LSA

    Knight of the Legion of Honour

    Mentioned in Despatches 1855, 1856

    8 Sep

    On this day in September 1855, Assistant Surgeon Henry Thomas Sylvester VC MD LRCS LSA Knight of the Legion of Honour was awarded the Victoria Cross.

    “For going out on 8 Sep 1855 under a heavy fire, in front of the fifth parallel Right Attack, to a spot near the Redan, where Lieut and Adjutant Dyneley was lying mortally wounded and for dressing his wounds in that dangerous and exposed situation. This officer was also mentioned in General Sir James Simpson’s Despatch of 18 Sep 1855 for his courage in going to the front under a heavy fire to assist the wounded”.




    SURGEON GENERAL HERBERT TAYLOR READE

    VC CB QHS

    14 & 16 Sep

    On this day in September 1857, Surgeon General Herbert Taylor Reade VC CB QHS was awarded the Victoria Cross.

    “Dates of Acts of Bravery: 14 and 16 Sep 1857. During the Siege of Delhi and on the 14th Sept 1857, while Surgeon Reade was attending to the wounded at the end of one of the streets of the city, a party of rebels advanced from the direction of the Bank and, having established themselves in the houses of the street, commenced firing from the roofs. The wounded were thus in very great danger and would have fallen into the hands of the enemy, had not Surgeon Reade drawn his sword and calling upon the few soldiers who were near to follow, succeeded, after a very heavy fire, in dislodging the rebels from this position. Surgeon Reade’s party consisted of about ten in all, of whom two were killed and five or six wounded. Surgeon Reade also accompanied the regiment at the Assault on Delhi and on the morning of the 16 Sep 1857, was one of the first up at the breach in the magazine, which was stormed by the 61st Regt, and Belooch Battalion, on which occasion he, with the sergeant of the 61st Regt, spiked one of the enemy’s guns”.



    CAPGTAIN HARRY SHERWOOD RANKEN

    VC MB ChB MRP

    Knight of the French Legion of Honour

    Mention in Despatches 1914

    19 & 20 Sep

    On this day in September 1914, Captain Harry Sherwood Ranken VC MB ChB MRCP was awarded the Victoria Cross.

    “For tending wounded in the trenches under rifle and shrapnel fire at Hautvesnes on the 19th and 20th September, continuing to attend to the wounded after his own thigh and leg had been shattered”.

    The Times History of the War states that”… no man ever won the Victoria Cross more nobly than did Captain Harry Sherwood Ranken RAMC. Captain Ranken was severely wounded in the leg whilst attending to his duties on the battlefield. He arrested the bleeding from this and bound it up, and then continued to dress the wounds of his men, sacrificing his own chances of survival to their needs. When he finally permitted himself to be carried to the rear, his case had become almost desperate. He died within a short period”.



    CAPTAIN GEORGE ALLAN MALING

    VC MA MB BCh

    Mentioned in Despatches 1915

    25 Sep

    On this day in September 1915, Captain George Allan Maling VC MA MB Bch was awarded the Victoria Cross.

    “For most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty during the heavy fighting near Fauquissart on 25 September 1915. Lieutenant Maling worked incessantly with untiring energy from 6.25 am on the 25th till 8 am on the 26th collecting and treating in the open, under heavy shell fire, more than 300 men.

    At about 11 am on the 25th, he was flung down and temporarily stunned by the bursting of a large high explosive shell which wounded his only assistant and killed several of his patients. A second shell soon after covered him and his assistants with debris, but high courage and zeal never failed him and he continued his gallant work single-handed”.




    ASSISTANT SURGEON VALENTINE MUNBEE McMASTER

    VC MD

    25 Sep

    On this day in September 1857, Assistant Surgeon Valentine Munbee McMaster VC MD was awarded the Victoria Cross.

    “For the intrepidity with which he exposed himself to the f ire of the enemy and bringing in the attending to the wounded at Lucknow”.

    He was voted the distinction of the Victoria Cross by the

    Universal acclamation of the men and officers of the regiment by whom he was esteemed with a fervour amounting to devotion.”




    25 September 1857


    DEPUTY INSPECTOR GENERAL JOSEPH JEE

    VC CB QHS MRCS

    25 Sep

    On this day in September 1857, Deputy Inspector General Joseph Jee VC CB QHS MRCS was awarded the Victoria Cross.

    “For most conspicuous gallantry and important services on the entry of the late Major General Havelock’s relieving force into Lucknow, on the 25th September 1857, in having, during action (when the 78th Highlanders, then in possession of the Char Bagh, captured two 9-pounders at the point of the bayonet), by great exertion and devoted exposure, attended to the large number of men wounded in the charge, whom he succeeded in getting removed on cots and the backs of their comrades, until he had collected the dhooly-bearers who had fled. Subsequently, on the same day in endeavouring to reach the Residency with the wounded men, Surgeon Jee became besieged by an overwhelming force in the Mote Mehal, where he remained during the whole night and the following morning, voluntarily and repeatedly exposing himself to a heavy fire in proceeding to dress the wounded men who fell while serving a 24-pounder in a most exposed position. He eventually succeeded in taking many of the wounded through a cross fire of ordnance and musketry safely into the Residency by the river bank, although repeatedly warned not to make the perilous attempt.”


    ASISTANT SURGEON WILLIAM BRADSHAW

    VC LRCSI

    26 Sep

    On this day in September 1857, Assistant Surgeon William Bradshaw VC LRCSI was awarded the Victoria Cross.

    “William Bradshaw, Assistant Surgeon 90th Regt. Date of Act of Bravery: 26th Sep 1857. For intrepidity and good conduct when ordered with Surgeon Home, 90th Regt, to remove the wounded men left behind the column that forced its way into the Residency of Lucknow, on the 26th Sep 1857. The dhooly-bearers had left the dhoolies, but by great exertions and notwithstanding the close proximity of the sepoys, Surgeon Home and Assistant Surgeon Bradshaw got some of the bearers together and Assistant Surgeon Bradshaw, with about twenty dhoolies, becoming separated from the rest of the party, succeeded in reaching the Residency in safety by the river bank.


    SURGEON GENERAL SIR ANTHONY DICKSON HOME

    VC KCB MD MRCS

    26 Sep

    On this day in September 1857, Surgeon General Sir Anthony Dickson Home VC KCB MD MRCS was awarded the Victoria Cross.

    “For Persevering bravery and admirable conduct in charge of the wounded men left behind the column, when the troops under the late Major General Havelock forced their way into the Residency of Lucknow, on the 26th September 1857. The escort left with the wounded had, by casualties, been reduced to a few stragglers and bring entirely separated from the column, this small party with the wounded were forced into a house in which they defended themselves till it was set on fire. They then retreated to a shed a few yards from it and in this place continued to defend themselves for more than 22 hours, till relieved. At last, only six men and Mr. Home remained to fire. Of the four officers who were with conduct of the defence during the later part of the time therefore devolved on Mr. Home and to his active exertions and his good conduct throughout, the safety of the wounded and their successful defence, is mainly to be attributed.”



    SURGEON GENRAL SIR JAMES MOUAT

    VC MCB QHS MD FRCS

    26 Oct

    On this day in October 1854, Surgeon General Sir James Mouat VC KCB QHS MD FRCS was awarded his Victoria Cross.

    His citation reads:

    “Date of act of Bravery: 26 Oct 1854. For having voluntarily proceeded to the assistance of Lieut Colonel Morris, CB, 17th Lancers, who was lying dangerously wounded in an exposed position after the retreat of Light Cavalry at the Battle of Balaklava and having dressed the officer’s wounds in the presence and under a heavy fire of the enemy. Thus, by stopping a severe haemorrhage, he assisted in saving that officer’s life”.




    CAPTAIN NOEL GODFREY CHAVASSE

    VC AND BAR MC MA MB BCh

    26 Oct

    On this day in October 1916, Captain Noel Godfrey Chavasse, VC and Bar MC MA MB BCh was awarded the Victoria Cross.

    “For most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty. During an attack, he tended the wounded in the open all day under heavy fire, frequently in view of the enemy. During the ensuing night, he searched for wounded on the ground in front of the enemy’s lines for four hours. Next day, he took one stretcher-bearer to the advanced trenches and under heavy shell fire carried an urgent case for 500 yards into safety, being wounded in the side by a shell splinter during the return journey. The same night, he took a party of twenty volunteers, rescued three wounded men from a shell hole 36 yards from the enemy’s trenches, buried the bodies of two officers and collected many identity discs, although fired on by bombs and machine guns.

    Altogether, he saved the lives of some twenty wounded men, besides the ordinary cases which passed through his hands; his courage and self-sacrifice were beyond praise.”



    LIEUTENANT COLONEL ARTHUR MARTIN-LEAKE

    VC AND BAR LRCP FRCS

    ORDER OF THE MONTENIGAN RED CROSS

    Mentioned in Despatches 1917

    29 Nov

    On this day in November 1914, Lieutenant Colonel Arthur Martin-Leake VC and Bar LRCP FRCS were awarded the Bar to the Victoria Cross.

    “For most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty throughout the campaign, especially during the period 29 Oct to 3 Nov 1914, near Zonnebeke, in rescuing, whilst exposed to constant fire, a large number of the wounded who were lying close to the enemy’s trenches.”

    He was the first man ever to win a Bar to the Victoria Cross.



    CAPTAIN JOHN FOX-RUSELL

    VC MC MRCS


    6 Nov

    On this day in November 1917, Captain John Fox-Russell VC MC MRCS was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross.

    “For most conspicuous bravery displayed in action until he was killed. Captain Russell repeatedly went out to attend to the wounded under murderous fire from snipers and machine guns and in many cases where no other means were at hand, carried them in himself, although almost exhausted. He showed the highest possible degree of valour”.






    LIEUTENANT COLONEL WILLIAM TEMPLE

    VC BA MB LRCSI

    20 Nov

    On this day in November 1863, Lieutenant Colonel William Temple VC BA MB LRCSI was awarded the Victoria Cross.

    “For gallant conduct during the assault of the enemy’s position at Rangiriri in New Zealand, on the 20th Nov 1863, in exposing their lives to imminent danger, in crossing the entrance of the Maori Keep at a point upon which the enemy had concentrated their fire, with a view to render assistance to the wounded and more especially to the late Capt Mercer of the Royal Artillery. Lieut Pickard, it is said, crossed and recrossed the parapet to procure water for the wounded when none of the men could be induced to perform this service, the space over which he traversed being exposed to a cross-fire and testimony is borne to the calmness displayed by his and Assistant Surgeon Temple under the trying circumstances to which they were exposed”.




    LIEUTENANT COLONEL ARTHUR MARTIN-LEAKE

    VC AND BAR LRCP FRCS

    ORDER OF THE MONTENIGAN RED CROSS

    Mentioned in Despatches 1917

    29 Nov

    On this day in November 1914, Lieutenant Colonel Arthur Martin-Leake VC and Bar LRCP FRCS were awarded the Bar to the Victoria Cross.

    “For most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty throughout the campaign, especially during the period 29 Oct to 3 Nov 1914, near Zonnebeke, in rescuing, whilst exposed to constant fire, a large number of the wounded who were lying close to the enemy’s trenches.”

    He was the first man ever to win a Bar to the Victoria Cross.




    MAJOR THOMAS JOSEPH CREAN

    VC DSO HonFRCS LRCP LRCSI LM

    Mentioned in Despatches 1915

    18 Dec

    On this day in December 1901, Major Thomas Joseph Creat VC DSO Hon FRCS LRCP LRCSI LM was awarded the Victoria Cross.

    “During the action with De Wet at Tygerskloof on the 18th Dec 1901, this officer continued to attend to the wounded in the firing line, under a heavy at only 150 yards’ range, after he had himself been wounded and only desisted when he was hit a second time and as it was first thought, mortally wounded”.



    LEUTENANT GENERAL SIR WILLIAM BABTIE

    VC KCB KCMG KStJ KHS MB LRCP&S (Ed) Hon LID (Glas)

    Mentioned in Despatches 1899, 1915, 1916

    15 Dec

    On this day in December 1899, Lieutenant General Sir William Babtie VC KCB KCMG KStJ KHS MB LRCP & S (Ed) Hon LID (Glas) was awarded the Victoria Cross.

    “At Colenso, on the 15th December 1899, the wounded of the 14th and 66th Batteries, Royal Field Artillery, were lying in an advanced donga close to the rear of the guns, without any medical officer to attend to them: and when a message was sent back asking for assistance, Major W Babtie RAMC rode up under a heavy rifle-fire, his pony being hit three times. When he arrived at the donga where the wounded were lying in a sheltered corner, he attended to them all, going from place to place, exposed to the heavy rifle-fire which greeted anyone who showed himself. Later on in the day, Major Babtie went out with Capt Congreve to bring in Lieut Roberts, who was lying wounded on the veldt. This also was under a heavy fire”.





    MAJOR GENERAL HENRY EDWARD MANNING DOUGLAS
    VC CB CMG DSO LRCP & S LRFP & S FRGS
    Mentioned in Despatches in 1900, 1901, 1916, 1917, 1919
    Croix de Guerre with Palm
    Officer of the Serbian Order of St. Sava
    Officer of the Serbian Order of the Samaritan
    Officer of the Serbian Order of the Red Cross

    11 Dec
    On this day in December 1899, Major General Henry Edward Manning Douglas VC CB DSO LRCP & S LRFP & S FRGS was awarded the Victoria Cross.

    “On the 11th December 1899, during the action at Magersfontein, Lieut Douglas showed great gallantry and devotion under a very severe fire, in advancing in the open and attending to Capt Gordon, Gordon Highlanders, who was wounded and also attending to Major Robinson and other wounded men under a fearful fire. Many similar acts of devotion and gallantry were performed by Lieut Douglas on the same day”.
     
  7. Three men have won the VC twice (these receive an extra bar to their original cross) - Arthur MARTIN-LEAKE, Noel CHAVASSE and Charles UPHAM.

    The youngest winners were 15 years old (Andrew FITZGIBBON and Thomas FLINN). The oldest was 61 (William RAYNOR).

    Five civilians have also been awarded the VC (while under military command) - James ADAMS, George CHICKEN, Thomas KAVANAGH, William McDONELL, and Ross MANGLES

    There have been three cases where both Father and Son have received the Victoria Cross:

    Lieutenant Frederick S. ROBERTS, Indian Mutiny and
    Lieutenant Frederick H.S. ROBERTS, Boer War.
    Captain Walter N. CONGREVE, Boer War and
    Bt./Major William La T. CONGREVE, World War I.
    Major Charles J.S. GOUGH, Indian Mutiny and
    Bt./Major John E. GOUGH, Somaliland.

    There are four known cases of awards to Brothers:

    Lieutenant-Commander George N. BRADFORD, World War I and
    T/Lieutenant Colonel Roland B. BRADFORD, World War I.
    Major Charles J.S. GOUGH, Indian Mutiny and
    Lieutenant Hugh H. GOUGH, Indian Mutiny.
    Captain Euston H. SARTORIUS, Afghan War and
    Major Reginald W. SARTORIUS, Ashanti.
    Second Lieutenant Alexander B. TURNER, World War I and
    T/Lieutenant Colonel Victor B. TURNER, World War II.

    Although no women have yet won the VC, a gold representation of the decoration was presented to Mrs. Webber Harris (wife of the commanding officer 104th Bengal Fusiliers) by the officers of the Regiment for her "indomitable pluck" in nursing the men of the Regiment during a cholera outbreak in September 1859. The outbreak was so bad that 27 men died in one night.

    The only ungazetted award is the VC presented to the World War I American Unknown Soldier, buried at Arlington National Cemetery (the Congressional Medal of Honour was conferred on the British Unknown Warrior in Westminster Abbey).

    Although the Victoria Cross can only be bestowed for actions "in the presence of the enemy" from 1858 to 1881 an amendment allowed for awards "under circumstances of extreme danger". Six awards were made under these conditions - David BELL, James COOPER, Campbell DOUGLAS, William GRIFFITHS, Thomas MURPHY, and Timothy O'HEA.

    An expulsion clause allowed for a recipient's name to be erased from the official Register in certain wholly discreditable circumstances, and his pension cancelled.

    Although there are eight recorded cases of forfeiture, in accordance with the terms of the original Warrant, all eight men are still included in the main total and no mention of the forfeiture is made except as a note at the bottom of the War Office List, which covers the period 1856 to August 1914.

    King George V felt very strongly that the decoration should never be forfeited. In a letter written by his Private Secretary, Lord Stamfordham, on 26th July 1920, his views are forcibly expressed: "The King feels so strongly that, no matter the crime committed by anyone on whom the VC has been conferred, the decoration should not be forfeited. Even were a VC to be sentenced to be hanged for murder, he should be allowed to wear his VC on the scaffold".

    Midshipman Edward DANIEL, Crimean War
    Convicted of desertion / evading court martial. Warrant authorising forfeiture: 4 Sept 1861.

    Sergeant James McGUIRE, Indian Mutiny
    Convicted of theft of a cow. 22 Dec 1862.

    Private Valentine BAMBRICK, Indian Mutiny
    Convicted of assault and theft of a comrade's medals. 3 Dec 1863.

    Private Michael MURPHY, Indian Mutiny
    Convicted of theft of 10 bushels of oats. 5 Mar 1872.

    Private Thomas LANE, China
    Convicted of desertion on active service & theft of a horse, arms and accoutrements. 7 Apr 1881.

    Private Frederick CORBETT, Egypt & Sudan
    Convicted of embezzlement & theft from an officer. 30 Jul 1884.

    Gunner James COLLIS, Afghan War
    Convicted of bigamy. 18 Nov 1895.

    Private George RAVENHILL, Boer War
    Convicted of theft of iron. 24 Aug 1908.

    Fred HALL, Leo CLARKE, and Robert SHANKLAND all lived in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. They all happened to live on the same street, Pine Street and it is believed to be the only street in the world to have three Victoria Cross winners that lived there. The city of Winnipeg later renamed it Valour Road in honour of the men. A bronze plaque is mounted on a street lamp to tell this story.

    Charles LUCAS was the first person to be rewarded with the Victoria Cross.

    Cecil BUCKLEY was the first winner of the VC to be actually gazetted on 24 Feb 1857.

    Henry RABY was the first man to actually receive the Victoria Cross from The Queen at the first investiture (26 June 1857).

    William RHODES-MOORHOUSE was the first airman to perform an action subsequently rewarded with the Victoria Cross.

    William McBEAN held every rank from Private to Major General.

    Stanley HOLLIS was the only person to be awarded the Victoria Cross at the D-Day landings.

    John HANNAH was the youngest recipient of the Victoria Cross for aerial operations at the age of 19.

    William COLTMAN was the most decorated NCO of the First World War.

    Horace RAMSDEN was awarded the Victoria Cross for saving his brother's life.

    Eric NICOLSON was the only Battle of Britain VC and the only R.A.F. fighter pilot to gain the award during the Second World War.
     
  8. Blimey - thanks!
     
  9. I have them as a Word Document ...PM me and email addy and ill send them over