VAT on Kit

Discussion in 'Weapons, Equipment & Rations' started by Travelgall, Sep 10, 2010.

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  1. Does anybody know whether military kit is subject to VAT. I ordered some Gucci pieces of Kit from the States - The new Infra Red Gerber Recon Torch, a Molle MTP Pouch for it, Some Glint Tape, Mag couplers and a few other bits and pieces. They are holding it at the post office for VAT and a "Clearance Fee". Question is this... Can I get away with not paying VAT on it as although it didn't get posted to a BFPO Address. I can waive my MOD 90 under their noses and prove that the kit is for military use.
     
  2. Simple answer is no.

    It is subject to VAT and you are also subject to import duty rates, not only on the items but also the post and package.

    Many years ago when Blackhawk was more of a Blackpigeon I bought some kit from them at a total cost of $60.00. I had to write a cheque to UPS when it arrived for another £60.00 due to duty etc. For what ever reason UPS never cashed the cheque!
     
  3. Its UPS you paying the VAT and handling charge to not the original supplier IIRC ,In future try and get the sender to post it to a BFPO or as a gift troble is if they send it as a gift they might not always put the real value of the goods on the parcel ,and if lost you wont be able to claim the real value !
     
  4. Correct me if I'm wrong (i usually am) if stuff is bought and used for work you can claim the v.a.t back.
     
  5. Only if the company is making more than £60,000 per year, and the company claims it back.

    What you're thinking of is income tax. If you do your own taxes (which you won't do in the Army), you can write off some of your tax with your expenses. I consider absolutely anything related to my company as an expense, so I can reduce my tax outgoings. I'm not sure, if somebody else does your taxes, if this can still be applied.

    For instance, I could buy myself a new bike, and so long as I ride it to work once, I have bought the bike for work purposes, and therefore can write it off as a business expense and not pay any tax on that item. That doesn't mean I don't pay the tax when buying the bike though. It just means, if the bike cost £300, then I don't pay tax on £300 of my earnings.