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V.C & marks of respect

#1
In the RN a V.C holder is entitled to having the side piped (and guard??) when entering a main gate. As far as I can remember. What is the score in the army? Is a V.C holder entitled to a salute? What is the Army equivilent of the navy "piping the side"?

Cheers.
 
#2
Don't know how true, but I've heard a VC holder is entitled to a salute and on any parades is the last one to march on and the first to march off.
 
#4
Bonnie Tyler escorts each VC holder everywhere they go, she holds open the door for them and gives a belt of 'I need a hero' prior to talcum powdering their bottoms
 
#5
supermatelot said:
In the RN a V.C holder is entitled to having the side piped (and guard??) when entering a main gate. As far as I can remember. What is the score in the army? Is a V.C holder entitled to a salute? What is the Army equivilent of the navy "piping the side"?

Cheers.
This has been asked before, The best that could be found was on wiki that said they did get saluted and people from Beharry VC unit saying that he got saluted.
However no one could find it written down offically, Does it actually say anywhere the a VC holder in the navy is officially entitles to anything or is it a bit of a tradition?
I wonder where it come from because in the time of Queen Victoria I can't see anyone saluting a private no matter what he has done and since then you would only know someone had a VC if you knew him personally or he was in his No2s.
Ps what the hell does piping the side mean?
 
#6
Mighty_doh_nut said:
Bonnie Tyler escorts each VC holder everywhere they go, she holds open the door for them and gives a belt of 'I need a hero' prior to talcum powdering their bottoms
No bacon sandwich from the badge in the morning? Hardly seems worth the effort.
 
#7
Piping the side is carried out with a "bosun's call" (fancy whistle). Its the whistle thing you hear on old ww2 navy movies etc. The Side is what is "piped" (whistled) when a senior flag rank or other crosses the gangway. It is 4 seconds low pitch - 4 high - 4 low...Or is it 3? I've been out 3 years now.

I remember from basic one of the questions on what occasion the side would be piped. One is for a dead body and then royalty and then VC...etc.

Never seen it written in QRNs though..not that I ever read them.
 
#8
I remember asking the CO this at a mess do when I was p1ssed enough to actually ask him bone questions.

Appararently, it isn't written anywhere and certainly isn't in QR's what HAS to be done, but has been a tradition from when the VC (and GC) was created that a VC or GC holder is saluted first, regardless of rank, and is also "last on, first off", a tradition that The Boss told me is still honoured.

But considering we had no serving VC holders in at the time, I have no idea how that pans out in the real world today.
 
#11
With regards to bugles there are some units that still use bugles but I've no idea what all the sodding calls are for. Current lot of guards in this place are big on bugles.
 
#12
Aunty Stella said:
I remember asking the CO this at a mess do when I was p1ssed enough to actually ask him bone questions.

Appararently, it isn't written anywhere and certainly isn't in QR's what HAS to be done, but has been a tradition from when the VC (and GC) was created that a VC or GC holder is saluted first, regardless of rank, and is also "last on, first off", a tradition that The Boss told me is still honoured.

But considering we had no serving VC holders in at the time, I have no idea how that pans out in the real world today.
The mighty and long serving military +XXXXXXXXXXX+

Shows how the British Military have no FCUKING clue how the British military actually functions.

British Military caring/ knowing about soldiers?

I have removed my opinions, ggggggrrrrrr.
 
#13
supermatelot said:
Is there an army equivilent of piping the side or is it just salute only? Do you not do bugles or something?

Apologies if bone but I would not know.
No.
Along with Rum and Sodomy, that was left to the "senior Service"
:twisted:
 
#14
HOW ABOUT A SIMPLE CHART ON THE WALL OF EVERY CO/OC/ADL/QM/RSM/ASM/SSM/TOTAL KNOB

SHOWING HOW THE VC/ MM = NO ORRIFACE / BLAH BLAH SHOULD BE GREETED.

NO, I hear.

Suddenly, VC's are "given" to COMMON SOLDIERS.

What will the army bah,m blah,bla\h
 
#15
vampireuk said:
With regards to bugles there are some units that still use bugles but I've no idea what all the sodding calls are for. Current lot of guards in this place are big on bugles.
The bugle calls are:-
wakey, wakeeeey!
Breakfast is served!
Naafi tea break time!
Lunch is served!
Naafi tea break time (PM)
Dinner is served!
Night, night, sleep tight!
 
#16
oldgoat said:
HOW ABOUT A SIMPLE CHART ON THE WALL OF EVERY CO/OC/ADL/QM/RSM/ASM/SSM/TOTAL KNOB

SHOWING HOW THE VC/ MM = NO ORRIFACE / BLAH BLAH SHOULD BE GREETED.

NO, I hear.

Suddenly, VC's are "given" to COMMON SOLDIERS.

What will the army bah,m blah,bla\h
You're an alcoholic.
 
#18
stacker1 said:
This has been asked before, The best that could be found was on wiki that said they did get saluted and people from Beharry VC unit saying that he got saluted.
However no one could find it written down offically, Does it actually say anywhere the a VC holder in the navy is officially entitles to anything or is it a bit of a tradition?
I wonder where it come from because in the time of Queen Victoria I can't see anyone saluting a private no matter what he has done and since then you would only know someone had a VC if you knew him personally or he was in his No2s.
As you indicate, it's a myth-

But it's a self-fulfilling myth because if you throw one up to a non-commissioned VC because you believe that is what you have to do, you are making that myth become a reality.

The practicalities of saluting a VC within a unit that has a serving non-commissioned VC holder are difficult and any CO/RSM worth his salt would discourage it, not least of all for the benefit of the holder of the VC. Life is sometimes made difficult enough for a serving VC holder without additional blurring of the status quo.

They would do well to take advice from the former COs of 1 KOSB who were, as far as I know, the last regiment (before now) to have a long serving non-commissioned VC holder.

But saluting is also a military compliment so if someone wishes to acknowledge a VC holder's bravery then there's nothing to stop them doing so and I would expect that once retired, whenever LCpl Beharry returns to his former unit as an honoured guest, that would be the norm.
But the myth says you have to salute a VC holder, and that ain't the case!
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
#19
In the bad old Navy of rum, something else and the lash, to save a senior officer having to clamber up the side of a man of war he might be hoist up out of his barge on a boatswain's chair. The orders for this (as for other evolutions) could or would be given on the boatswain's call, whose high notes could be heard in a high wind better than shouted orders, and which has been in use unchanged certainly since Elizabethan times. The Admiralty Manual of Seamanship shows all the different calls which were (?are?) in use. When iron and steam replaced wood and sail ships began to have a more civilised accommodation ladder which obviated the need for the chair (you can't rig that sort of ladder against the curved tumble-home of a traditional wooden ship). For senior officers therefore the 'Side' call was piped as they came up the ladder, timed so as to end as the foot reached the top platform. It is preceded by the 'Still' to call hands on the upper deck to attention as the barge approaches, and followed by the 'Carry On' when the digintary is safely on board. If a drummer (RM bugler) is borne the 'Alert' and the 'Carry On' replace those calls.

The side is piped between sunrise and sunset for all Flag Officers and Commodores [NB Commodores are not Flag Officers as they fly a pendant rather than a flag] and for Commanding Officers of all ranks of commissioned Commonwealth warships or tenders, as long as those Officers are in uniform, and if comng aboard by brow when the ship is alongside these are only piped by prior arrangement, and for Commonwealth officers under the same rules; for the President or member of a Court Martial; for the Officer of the Guard if flying his Guard pendant (this is an indication that the gangway staff are awake); for uniformed foreign (non-Commonwealth) naval officers at all times; for certain members of the Royal Family in naval uniform; and for the Sovereign, who is the Lord High Admiral, who is the only living person piped in plain clothes; and for dead bodies; and see QRRN art.9203 for a complete list.

VC's are saluted but they are not entitled to have the Side piped.
 
#20
I think whether its a myth or whether its true

the holders of a Nations top award should be saluted-

on a slightly different point

I was flying from Ramstein to Sarajevo and there was a special lounge for Medal of Honour holders and their

families-

Do holders of the VC get to go into the posh part of Brize Norton
 

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