V.C. and C.M.H.

Discussion in 'The Intelligence Cell' started by datumhead, Jan 18, 2007.

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  1. Last night whilst watching N.C.I.S. ( i know, I know :yawnstretch: ) the story involved a Congresional Medal of Honour winner who was suffering guilt about a wartime incident. anyhoo in the program 2 USMC MP's were about to nick the old boy when they saw his CMH and came to attention and gave a salute. Is this tv bull or is this right?
    Do we do the same for the Victoria Cross or am I right in thinking you don't salute civilians regardless of their awards?

    I know there aren't many living recipients of the V.C. and that lead me to my next question, and this is not meant to start a slanging match, but what are the comparative award valuves?

    The American habit of dishing gong's out like smarties does detract from their worth,.........doesn't it?
     
  2. If you see LCpl Beharry wearing his VC you are meant to salute him. In all honesty i'd rather salute him than many of the senior officers i've encountered!

    Having spoken to Yanks in Baghdad while on Telic all the ribbons you see on their uniform aren't all for ops or bravery etc. They get ribbons for each posting, adventure trg etc they do. One thing that did make me laugh is that if an American Herc flies over NI on the way to Germany or alike, they are entitled to a NI medal!
     
  3. If you don't salute a VC, then IMHO you should, it should be a rule :headbang: . The CMH as I believe requires all those encountering said heros should salute or is that just Holywood........Trip_Wire info please :thumleft:
     
  4. Personally I don't think that anyone in uniform would not pay a respect to a VC winner.

    They earned it and deserve respect.


    fastmedic
     
  5. CMH is like the VC and only given for serious feats of bravery. I know Mike Thornton CMH USN navy seal who won his in Vietnam. If you google his name you will see what he did. Nails.
     
  6. I thought that everyone has to salute a VC, even the C in C
     
  7. Done and yep!
     
  8. The CMH is saluted by all US Officers and servicemen regardless of rank.
    Not so sure there is any QR about saluting a VC recipient, it could be a case of copying the Septics but for once I'm happy to do it.
     
  9. Me too......so does that mean that a VC winner never has to salute anyone, being that they automatically get saluted first?

    P
     
  10. I thought it was the rule that regardless of rank while he/she are wearing the medal then they get saluted first

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria_Cross

    Under the awards section of this its there in black and white!


    Edited to include additional info
     
  11. In my early service as a junior, we were told that a VC, boarding a ship, or entering a Naval Establishment, was entitled to a "present" from the (gangway) sentry, and a full "man the side" and salute, from gangway staff. I also recall (?), that during the 60s, when instructing at Raleigh, the same applied.

    2BM
     
  12. Please note - not "Congressional Medal of Honor(sic)" but simply "Medal of Honor(sic)"
     
  13. I think CGS at the time of Beharry's award said on camera about being honoured to have to salute him/it.
     
  14. untallguy

    untallguy Old-Salt Reviewer Book Reviewer

    It's the US way of recording service - the idea being that you can look at a soldier's medals and determine what he's done in the Forces, where he served and when etc etc. It's their way and it works for them.
     
  15. IIRC having spoken to some USAF guys from RAF Croughton each of the ribbons does not equate to a medal. However one US Army Lt Col had about 5 rows of miniatures on his mess dress!

    I don't believe that bravery awards are dished out like smarties. But it does look strange when you see a US serviceman in No.2 dress equivalent showing ribbons and wearing medals where the number of medals is far smaller than the number of ribbons.