V-22 Lemon Grounded AGAIN!

Discussion in 'Current Affairs, News and Analysis' started by codbutt, Feb 13, 2007.

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  1. Yes, when does a lemon cost $100 million a pop?
    When it's the Boeing-Bell V-22.
    The USMC have grounded the lot again (see www.flightglobal.com).
    Meanwhile, hundreds of Mi-17s round the world grind on, rain or shine, wiht s*d all maintenance.
    Still, jobs for the chaps in Amarillo, eh?
     
  2. True....But would you climb into the back of Mi-17?
     
  3. I'd rather climb into the back of Betty Turpin than a V-22.

    Hips are ok. So long as you have in the front of your mind that the landing will be a crash.

    If it's not, it's a bonus.
     

  4. In July 2002, Kazan signed an international marketing agreement with BAE Systems of the UK and Kelowna Flightcraft of Canada for an upgraded version, the Mi-172 medium-utility and transport helicopter. The Mi-172 has a new mission system from BAE Systems Avionics, new glass cockpit with Honeywell electronic flight instrument system and BAE Systems' Titan 385 stabilised multi-sensor turret.


    http://www.airforce-technology.com/projects/mi8t/
     

  5. It'll be worse than the original if British Waste of Space have touched it.
     
  6. The Mi-8's that used to be used for the 'Bos Bus' in Bosnia were generally avoided like the plague by British troops, easy to do as they generally ran on the Tuesday and Thursday, with the Chinooks doing the other days.

    Then again, except for the one that piled into the side of a mountain they ploded on day after day, plus the aircrew used to have bottles of moonshine vodka for sale too.
     
  7. Not much. They'd swigged most of it.
     
  8. That was the stuff that they syphoned out of the coolant system.

    I waited on the pan at DJ Bks for my first cabby on that Icon of Soviet engineering and noticed the Pax dragging their kit off were all covered in Hydraulic Oil, then the "loady" opened an inspection cover and with fag in mouth and big spanner proceeded to smash fk out of what ever leaky pipe that was nearest.

    Needless to say this callsign fked off sharpish and went up country again by road.
     
  9. I've spent many happy hours flying in and jumping out of Mi-8s, and they are a fantastic piece of kit. They go on and on, provided you put kerosene in and keep the lubricants up to level. In fact at my parachute club, they ran the beast on diesel!
    The Russians have the sense to build things as simply and ruggedly as possible. I once read somewhere about an Mi-17 used by Executive Outcomes (South African mercenary outfit) getting hit by a Stinger in Angola, and actually flying a couple of K's further down the road before the guy put it down, more or less in one piece.
    And there's more room inside an Mi-17 than a V-22, and it can autorotate, and doesn't take up so much space on deck, and works, and costs about 10% what the Amarillo Turkey costs.
     
  10. RTRing the MI-8's was always entertaining.

    Out gets 'loadie' with flying suit on the legs but with top half tied around his waist, preceeds to open fuel cap, stick nozzle in with the nozzle cap jammed in the trigger to keep it open leaving it dangling out of the filler on its own (bouncing away through a combination of a/c movement and pumping pressure) and then takes out his pack of fags for a smoke. We generally stayed outside the rotor disc as much as possible for those refuels.

    Of course there was also the 'ferry tank' inside, which was basically a few 205ltr drums lashed to the floor with a patty pump for transfering fuel to the main tanks, via a hose with was pushed out of the window and into the external fuel cap. All in flight of course!!

    The crews were complete loons.
     
  11. I was once in a Hip that had an electrical fire. Fortunately all the important bits were controlled by bl00dy great iron levers, and we make it down in one piece.
     
  12. Certain chips used in some flight control computers were not functioning properly at ambient temperatures of -1C or below.

    Now some might just find that a tad annoying so an alert is being sent out to warn military and commercial operators that use of those fitted with the afflicted chips in cold weather "could affect its performance".

    Like falling out of the sky.
     
  13. Hip pilot at the controls;


    [​IMG]
     
  14. It doesn't warp and melt the deck either.