USS John S McCain collides with merchant ship

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The CO ought to cull that shower of goofers. CO, NO, OOW, Mid, that's quite enough officers.
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Most captains I know tend to say forcefully, "Anyone who doesn't need to be here can now foxtrot oscar, please," when they're doing entry/exit of ports. Most of them feel it's bad enough having the harbour pilot on the bridge, let alone a load of hangers-on rubberneckers cluttering up the place as well.
According to a book I was reading recently, it is common practice for the pilot, the CO, and the XO to stand on the roof of the bridge. None of these three appear to be in that photo.
 

endure

GCM
The caption said something about it being Belfast-affiliated HMS Duncan entering Belfast harbour on an inaugural goodwill visit or somesuch, so they might all be there to witness the spcial occasion or similar BS.

Most captains I know tend to say forcefully, "Anyone who doesn't need to be here can now foxtrot oscar, please," when they're doing entry/exit of ports. Most of them feel it's bad enough having the harbour pilot on the bridge, let alone a load of hangers-on rubberneckers cluttering up the place as well.
I've sailed with an OM who was in the RNR (or whatever it was called in the 70s) who insisted on everybody and his dog being on the bridge when we entered/left harbour. All they did was get in the way.
 
According to a book I was reading recently, it is common practice for the pilot, the CO, and the XO to stand on the roof of the bridge. None of these three appear to be in that photo.
Er... no.
 
Err yes. The book was BRd167 and it was talking about the mandatory requirements for WaH PTW.

PS. Fosties don't wear green foulies.
When did they discard the green foulies?

Throughout my service on T22/23s I never witnessed the skipper and pilot on the bridge roof as a routine serial.
Things may have changed though so I defer to your higher knowledge ;)
 
I defer to your higher knowledge
I'm only going off something I read in a book, and the reason I remember it was because it struck me as odd. It's not something I've seen myself, but then again, it's not something I'm likely to see.

Oh, and Sept 2003.
 
I'm only going off something I read in a book, and the reason I remember it was because it struck me as odd. It's not something I've seen myself, but then again, it's not something I'm likely to see.

Oh, and Sept 2003.
Strange..I've seen fost staff in green foulies since then. I can also assure you that on t22(when we had them) and t23 the skipper used the bridge wings with pilot. Not the bridge roof.
 
Strange..I've seen fost staff in green foulies since then. I can also assure you that on t22(when we had them) and t23 the skipper used the bridge wings with pilot. Not the bridge roof.
Not wearing green foulies today, just normal foulies with FOST on them...
 
Not wearing green foulies today, just normal foulies with FOST on them...
I'm guessing once the the RN switched to the current foulies - they still had a few years stock of green ones from old supplier to get through first! Remember when the new ones came in - I got mine then was drafted to the Cornwall which nobody onboard had been issued them yet. Had to scrounge "normal foulies" for harbour stations for about a year until rest of the ship's company got the new ones. Had the same shit when they issued the Norgie jumper style 8's / 4's.
 

Seadog

ADC
Cal Mac seem to do OK into some tight places with a lot less than that.
For ferries, possibly the same two tight spaces day in and day out for an entire career. You should get the hang of it. A Master with regular experience of a port will be exempt the requirement for a pilot for entering and leaving that port.
 

BeachDaze

Old-Salt
Getting back to Bridge procedures on US warships; I stumbled across an interesting blog article on the US Naval Institute website written by a retired USN Captain - which contained a surprising recollection: (full article is here)

"I will not pretend to have a clue regarding the circumstances that led to the collisions of the USS John S. McCain (DDG-56) or the USS Fitzgerald (DDG-63) so I won’t comment on what might or might not have happened. Nor am I the guy to critique the navy’s process for training and selecting officers for command-at-sea. But what I will say is that sometimes avoiding a collision is much more difficult than you’d think. In fact, I’m surprised it doesn’t happen more often.

In a career that included seven ships, six of them came mere feet away from catastrophes like what happened on the John S. McCain and the Fitzgerald. While roughly half of those near misses were the direct result of ownship negligence or poor watch-standing, the others were caused by either severe weather, low visibility, shipping density, engineering casualties, inherently risky missions in restricted waters, or some combination of those factors."


Even if half of them were the result of external factors; it strikes me as an extraordinarily large number of near miss ' catastrophes for one person to have experienced.
 

endure

GCM
I see one of the commentators below the article is saying that AIS shouldn't be turned on as it will tell the US's enemies where they are. They're in the Singapore Straits FFS. All you need to see them is a pair of binoculars.
 
I am waiting for the adhoc reckoning of our oracle on this latest update.
 

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