USS Fitzgerald Collision

Another ooops! moment for our American friends. Sounds like it was only a bit of a bump and a scrape during a RAS operation but I am sure they could have done without it after recent events. Is this kind of thing common with the RN and RFA?

U.S. Navy Cruiser Involved in Replenishment Collision
There was a disaster in the 1970s when a Ton class minesweeper of the RNR capsized while RASing. IIRC the ship wasn't closed up properly and so flooded quickly resulting in the deaths of 12 of the crew.

I don't think the ships collided. Big ships create a suction effect off their beam and this can destabilise small ships that get too close alongside while making way.
 
One of the all singing auto tension RAS rigs on Fort George did its own thing and fair heeled the receiver (memory suggests Leander but I'm don't think there were any left) I remember the the heavy jackstay whipping back when the hard point let go at the weld, nearly pulled the funnel out.
 
A very sobering article, reposted it to several of my oppos who still serve at sea and who have an interest in these things and all of them replied that it was genuinely stomach turning, especially the chaos in the aftermath of the collision.

God forbid it happens again and RIP to those who lost their lives.
That is a woeful tale, 12 miles vis and some dumb cluck believes a radar screen and ignores any attempt at lookout, plenty of hands on the bridge, contradictory helm orders, QM freezing at the helm??? Old Arleigh Burke must be doing some revs, down below.
 
Well the Navy is dropping criminal charges against the captain, CDR Benson and the tactical office, LT Combs and the Secretary of the Navy has issued letters of censure to them for incompetence and willful failure.
No trial but a letter of censure is career ending.

USNI article
 
Well the Navy is dropping criminal charges against the captain, CDR Benson and the tactical office, LT Combs and the Secretary of the Navy has issued letters of censure to them for incompetence and willful failure.
No trial but a letter of censure is career ending.

USNI article
Interesting defence that would have being argued by the LT. No wonder the Navy opted for the SLOC instead of a trial.
 
I'm only halfway or so through that article and already the story of that collision sounds like a clusterplop of epic proportions. The US Navy seems most to blame for sending an undermanned crew in a ship that wasn't ready for sea into far too many stressful missions.

If it were up to me I'd start by sacking 90 per cent of the top Naval officers who were there at the time - as well as SECNAV - and working my way on from there.
 
From Lloyd's List. It seems the Fitzgerald is out of drydock and continuing repairs alongside:

A press report, dated Apr 16, states: The guided-missile destroyer USS Fitzgerald leaves drydock and continues repairs at Pascagoula, as another step toward returning to the fleet as a fully ready, combat-capable ship. The ship achieved a milestone in its complex repair and restoration as it successfully launched and moored pier-side at Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) - Ingalls Shipbuilding shipyard, on Apr 16. To restore the impacted spaces to full operations and functionality, various Hull, Mechanical and Electrical (HM&E), Combat System (CS) and Command, Control, Communications, Computers and Intelligence (C5I) repairs are being conducted, according to the commanding officer of the vessel.
 
From Lloyd's List. It seems the Fitzgerald is out of drydock and continuing repairs alongside:

A press report, dated Apr 16, states: The guided-missile destroyer USS Fitzgerald leaves drydock and continues repairs at Pascagoula, as another step toward returning to the fleet as a fully ready, combat-capable ship. The ship achieved a milestone in its complex repair and restoration as it successfully launched and moored pier-side at Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) - Ingalls Shipbuilding shipyard, on Apr 16. To restore the impacted spaces to full operations and functionality, various Hull, Mechanical and Electrical (HM&E), Combat System (CS) and Command, Control, Communications, Computers and Intelligence (C5I) repairs are being conducted, according to the commanding officer of the vessel.
Hopefully the next time they send the boat out it will be fully crewed - with fully trained personnel, fully operational equipment, fittings and radar systems, and will also be closely supervised. None of which was evident on the thing's last cruise.
 
U.S. Navy Invests in Simulation to Boost Watchstander Proficiency

Adm. Bill Moran, the current vice chief of naval operations and President Donald Trump's nominee for chief of naval operations, said Tuesday that the U.S. Navy is investing heavily in simulation improve its navigation training. Adm. Moran headed the Navy's Readiness and Reform Oversight Council (also referred to as the Readiness Reform Oversight Committee) in the wake of the USS Fitzgerald and USS John S. McCain collisions, and he has been closely involved in efforts to overhaul the surface fleet's manning and training policies.

"[I was] very disappointed when I went out to the fleet in almost every location that I went out to, the simulation capability for the surface force was well below what I am used to in the aviation community," Adm. Moran said in an interview at CSIS. "The lesson we learned from the Fitzgerald and McCain was the poor communications and teamwork between the bridge and [Combat Information Center]. So we bolted on CIC simulation to the existing bridge simulators . . . and that is helping the instructors teach basic communications and some skills that are important to reinforce."

The Navy does not yet have the capacity to provide simulation training at the scale that commanding officers would like, Adm. Moran said, so it has budgeted for new integrated bridge simulators to fill the gap. "They exist today in the [Littoral Combat Ship] Program - if you've been to an LCS trainer, they're remarkable trainers, they're the best in the business," he said. "We should have that for every ship class in the Navy, or at least be able to reconfigure a simulator to mirror . . . the ship class." LCS officers of the deck have to qualify for their post in simulation testing before shipping out.
 
U.S. Navy Invests in Simulation to Boost Watchstander Proficiency

Adm. Bill Moran, the current vice chief of naval operations and President Donald Trump's nominee for chief of naval operations, said Tuesday that the U.S. Navy is investing heavily in simulation improve its navigation training. Adm. Moran headed the Navy's Readiness and Reform Oversight Council (also referred to as the Readiness Reform Oversight Committee) in the wake of the USS Fitzgerald and USS John S. McCain collisions, and he has been closely involved in efforts to overhaul the surface fleet's manning and training policies.

"[I was] very disappointed when I went out to the fleet in almost every location that I went out to, the simulation capability for the surface force was well below what I am used to in the aviation community," Adm. Moran said in an interview at CSIS. "The lesson we learned from the Fitzgerald and McCain was the poor communications and teamwork between the bridge and [Combat Information Center]. So we bolted on CIC simulation to the existing bridge simulators . . . and that is helping the instructors teach basic communications and some skills that are important to reinforce."

The Navy does not yet have the capacity to provide simulation training at the scale that commanding officers would like, Adm. Moran said, so it has budgeted for new integrated bridge simulators to fill the gap. "They exist today in the [Littoral Combat Ship] Program - if you've been to an LCS trainer, they're remarkable trainers, they're the best in the business," he said. "We should have that for every ship class in the Navy, or at least be able to reconfigure a simulator to mirror . . . the ship class." LCS officers of the deck have to qualify for their post in simulation testing before shipping out.
Officer of the watch manoeuvre drills are an almost daily, staple part of any RN sailing from A to B. The yanks learn this from BOST also.
 

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It's almost as though the US Navy were never a blue water navy, have never sailed out of sight of land, never operated huge fleets during WW2.

What went wrong?
 
Officer of the watch manoeuvre drills are an almost daily, staple part of any RN sailing from A to B. The yanks learn this from BOST also.
The thing that caught be eye was the mention of simulation - something I would have thought the Americans would have been using as much as we do. I am thinking of the bridge simulators at BRNC, navigation trainers at Collingwood, the things used for training helmsmen at the RN Seamanship School at Raleigh..... There are probably more.
 
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