USS Fitzgerald Collision

He was blowing the whistle because it's his job to do so.
 
As an outsider I found the episode involving HMS Duncan and the Russian aircraft buzzing interesting. Its ops room did seem very quiet and calm although that Jack who kept blowing the whistle should get a talking to. It also seemed very crowded but that may have been due to the Flag officer wandering around.
I've not seen the clip. Can envisage the following happening though in the ops room:

Ops officer piped to ops room 'at the rush'.

Warnings 1, 2 and 3 read on guard by APS.

Ship called to emergency stations (possibly) - all red openings closed.

APS giving closure commentary on command open line / Bravo group intercom (I may be out of touch with this).

Weapons systems / MD position reporting aquisition / tracking/lock.

All host of EW stuff I cant go into on here.

Would have maybe "rustled a Telegraph" in terms of RN ops room operations conduct.

I'm guessing the whistle blown was from the EWD upon detection??

@alfred_the_great

I've not seen clip

Edit: Have seen clip now. Few things don't add up. Had there been a genuine feeling of threat then I would have expected a few other "things" occurring and to have been audible during duration of the clip.

PR stunt.

I could of course be wrong... I don't think I am though.
 
Last edited:

jrwlynch

LE
Book Reviewer
As an outsider I found the episode involving HMS Duncan and the Russian aircraft buzzing interesting. Its ops room did seem very quiet and calm although that Jack who kept blowing the whistle should get a talking to.
The Electronic Warfare Director kept blowing his whistle and shouting, because the Russians kept turning the radars (DROP KICK and SLOT BACK) on their aircraft on: the fact that military aircraft were tracking the ship with weapon-control radars was important information for the command team to be aware of.
 
The Electronic Warfare Director kept blowing his whistle and shouting, because the Russians kept turning the radars (DROP KICK and SLOT BACK) on their aircraft on: the fact that military aircraft were tracking the ship with weapon-control radars was important information for the command team to be aware of.
Just for the laugh..."Beadwindow!"
 
The Electronic Warfare Director kept blowing his whistle and shouting, because the Russians kept turning the radars (DROP KICK and SLOT BACK) on their aircraft on: the fact that military aircraft were tracking the ship with weapon-control radars was important information for the command team to be aware of.
I'm sure you are aware that that is a 'Daily Mail' style analysis of events!
 

offog

LE
The Electronic Warfare Director kept blowing his whistle and shouting, because the Russians kept turning the radars (DROP KICK and SLOT BACK) on their aircraft on: the fact that military aircraft were tracking the ship with weapon-control radars was important information for the command team to be aware of.
When the incident was debriefed I am sure they got a lot of info from it and it provided a great training opportunity for the crew. To set up something like that would have cost £m. I do hope the MoD sent the Russian Squadrons a couple of cases of good Vodka in thanks.
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
RIP
My impression of the Duncan prog was that the inevitable cut and paste editing had not done the story line any favours but if one saw through that the Duncs were OK..
 

jrwlynch

LE
Book Reviewer
My impression of the Duncan prog was that the inevitable cut and paste editing had not done the story line any favours but if one saw through that the Duncs were OK..
I wonder how much of the editing was "cut and paste" and how much "can we just change that a bit...?" from parts (only parts) of LPDs being fuzzed out, to discussion of a nearby Russian Krivak-class frigate... accompanying rather nice imagery of the Kashin-class destroyer Smetlivy.
 
The Electronic Warfare Director kept blowing his whistle and shouting,
It all sounds like it harks back to Nelsons days, terribly old fashioned in this modern electronic age. Surely he could have a little bell that goes Bing Bong or something?
 

endure

GCM
It all sounds like it harks back to Nelsons days, terribly old fashioned in this modern electronic age. Surely he could have a little bell that goes Bing Bong or something?
I suspect he uses a whistle for the same reason that the Special Escort Group do. It cuts through all the crap and isn't easy to miss or ignore
 
It all sounds like it harks back to Nelsons days, terribly old fashioned in this modern electronic age. Surely he could have a little bell that goes Bing Bong or something?
"Bing Bong" to indicate you have been locked up by an enemy fire control radar?

Is the RAF equivalent of an ear-piercing whistle really "Avon Calling"? ;)
 
"Bing Bong" to indicate you have been locked up by an enemy fire control radar?

Is the RAF equivalent of an ear-piercing whistle really "Avon Calling"? ;)
In the RAF if a fire control radar locks onto you then something has gone very very wrong! :)

Besides which I was being a little facetious what with the navy piping people onboard, making pipes, having bells for watches (or time or something) etc. ;)
 
In the RAF if a fire control radar locks onto you then something has gone very very wrong! :)

Besides which I was being a little facetious what with the navy piping people onboard, making pipes, having bells for watches (or time or something) etc. ;)
My word. What sort of radar targets hotels?
 
It all sounds like it harks back to Nelsons days, terribly old fashioned in this modern electronic age. Surely he could have a little bell that goes Bing Bong or something?
Any fule no that is the All Arms signal for "Wounded Avon Lady"
 

offog

LE
In the RAF if a fire control radar locks onto you then something has gone very very wrong! :)

Besides which I was being a little facetious what with the navy piping people onboard, making pipes, having bells for watches (or time or something) etc. ;)
I remember bugle calls.

"Come to the cookhouse door boys"

If things don't change they stay the same. I must admit the whistle blast in an environment which would not normally have that sound will attract attention.
 
I remember bugle calls.

"Come to the cookhouse door boys"

If things don't change they stay the same. I must admit the whistle blast in an environment which would not normally have that sound will attract attention.
Probably teaching to 'suck eggs' but...

In a warship Ops room - when something is 'going on', the majority of operators will be listening to internal comms in one ear simultaeniously with external comms in the other. I can remember several occasions when I've been assessing a suspect air track and, whilst being in comms with another unit heard the whistle blown their side. The whistle is blown because it cuts through everything else - announcing a 'game changer' has just been detected and demands immediate attention. The Electronic warfare bods just shouting "slotback 165!" over command open line would be pretty unnoticable amongst the background noise of all the other stuff being transmitted.

If I was listening to Air warfare coord net and heard the whistle blown whilst listening to another unit - I'd be able to immediately escalate that to my PWO/Ops officer who would prepare accordingly. The captain may be giving some mundane sitrep and upon hearing the whistle-knows shit just got serious and so shuts up. More often the case - one of the PWOs will be berating the Ops room supervisor as he can't see surface tracks on his screen because he does not have them selected - the whistle blown will concentrate his mind towards something more productive than trying to score points over subordinates.

It also gives the electronic warfare wallahs a once in a lifetime moment of glory as they are pretty much unheard of the majority of the time!
 
Probably teaching to 'suck eggs' but...
Perfeck thanks. In ATC you have the split headset also, aircraft in one ear and ground comms in the other, completely ignore any other noise going on around you.
 
Perfeck thanks. In ATC you have the split headset also, aircraft in one ear and ground comms in the other, completely ignore any other noise going on around you.
You develop "radar ears" and learn to discriminate what info you can hear is relevent to what your particular role is.
 

Latest Threads

Top