USMC V-22 Osprey's Get Teeth.

Its been around a while now and greatly matured from its somewhat shaky first beginnings. The V-22 Osprey multi-mission, tilt-rotor has both vertical takeoff and landing, and short takeoff and landing capabilities. With its long-range, high-speed cruise performance its been deployed in transportation and medevac operations in Iraq, Afghanistan, Libya, and Kuwait. The U.S. Navy is also going to use the CMV-22B for carrier onboard delivery duties beginning 2021.

Principally used by the USMC to deploy troops to battle, they have long considered various weapon systems that could be added. While these can erode load capabilities and endurance they can be invaluable in situations like recovery missions where the need for defensive systems become highly desirable. They have also wanted to arm the MV-22B because there is a gap in escort capability.

With the right weapons and associated systems, armed MV-22Bs will be able to escort other V-22’s performing the traditional personnel delivery role, allowing the aircraft to defend itself should it come under attack from small arms fire, missiles or surface rockets and with its precision fire enabling it to support amphibious operations with suppressive or offensive fire as Marines approach their drop points

The aircraft's large helicopter-like propellers/rotors has prevented users from hanging guns and rockets from the wings, the wings themselves block the use of side-mounted machine guns like those in the UH-60 Blackhawk. But designers came up with a belly-mounted gatling gun and a tail-mounted machine gun.

The Interim Defensive Weapon System is a GAU-17/A 7.62 six-barrel rotary gun with a high, sustained rate of fire of 2,000 to 6,000 rounds per minute with a firing position on the belly and capable of 360 degree fire. Remotely controlled from inside the plane by a gunner using an LCD screen and controlling the gun with an Xbox type of controller.

Supplementing this the second weapon is a ramp-mounted M240 7.62 machine gun that covers the Osprey's rear. The ramp must be open during flight for the gun to fire which is particularly useful for suppressing enemy fire when exiting a landing zone.

U.S. Marines with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 268 started conducting defensive weapon system training, April 2020.

 
I remember design drawings from the 80s with a triple-barrel 20mm or 25mm rotary turreted under the fuselage. Odd that it's been diluted down to 7.62.

But all the original program managers have long since retired and someone probably thought they were being inventive in arming the Osprey
 

Blogg

LE
I remember design drawings from the 80s with a triple-barrel 20mm or 25mm rotary turreted under the fuselage. Odd that it's been diluted down to 7.62.

But all the original program managers have long since retired and someone probably thought they were being inventive in arming the Osprey
Been pratting about with half arsed options for years.

At one point was going to be rocket pods mounted either side of front until after extensive study somebody noticed the words "small", "not many", "unguided" and "forward facing."

Although quite capable of spreading gloom and despondency as required, that does seem a bit of a contraption.

Maybe that's why the word "Interim" features
 
I remember design drawings from the 80s with a triple-barrel 20mm or 25mm rotary turreted under the fuselage. Odd that it's been diluted down to 7.62.

But all the original program managers have long since retired and someone probably thought they were being inventive in arming the Osprey
Some of the original drawings had a nose-mounted turret for either an M197 (the AH-1’s gun) or what’s now the GAU-19 (it was the GECAL 50 or some such name at the time).

The idea of a nose turret hasn’t gone away (although I don’t know the date of this, I’m guessing it’s from later than the mid-80s)
 

TamH70

MIA
Catching up with Dale Brown's "Hammerheads" book about twenty years late (ish). He had an armed Osprey as the cover girl on that book's jacket cover.
 
Will a osprey ever enter a hot lz unescorted
That’s the question for implementing this protection
IMHO there are too many fragile parts in an Osprey and the chances of a successful forced landing are minimal... (unless they’ve traded payload for armoured transmission).
 
I'm pretty sure USAF CV-22 have gone into "hot" LZ already.
 
Its been around a while now and greatly matured from its somewhat shaky first beginnings. The V-22 Osprey multi-mission, tilt-rotor has both vertical takeoff and landing, and short takeoff and landing capabilities. With its long-range, high-speed cruise performance its been deployed in transportation and medevac operations in Iraq, Afghanistan, Libya, and Kuwait. The U.S. Navy is also going to use the CMV-22B for carrier onboard delivery duties beginning 2021.

Principally used by the USMC to deploy troops to battle, they have long considered various weapon systems that could be added. While these can erode load capabilities and endurance they can be invaluable in situations like recovery missions where the need for defensive systems become highly desirable. They have also wanted to arm the MV-22B because there is a gap in escort capability.

With the right weapons and associated systems, armed MV-22Bs will be able to escort other V-22’s performing the traditional personnel delivery role, allowing the aircraft to defend itself should it come under attack from small arms fire, missiles or surface rockets and with its precision fire enabling it to support amphibious operations with suppressive or offensive fire as Marines approach their drop points

The aircraft's large helicopter-like propellers/rotors has prevented users from hanging guns and rockets from the wings, the wings themselves block the use of side-mounted machine guns like those in the UH-60 Blackhawk. But designers came up with a belly-mounted gatling gun and a tail-mounted machine gun.

The Interim Defensive Weapon System is a GAU-17/A 7.62 six-barrel rotary gun with a high, sustained rate of fire of 2,000 to 6,000 rounds per minute with a firing position on the belly and capable of 360 degree fire. Remotely controlled from inside the plane by a gunner using an LCD screen and controlling the gun with an Xbox type of controller.

Supplementing this the second weapon is a ramp-mounted M240 7.62 machine gun that covers the Osprey's rear. The ramp must be open during flight for the gun to fire which is particularly useful for suppressing enemy fire when exiting a landing zone.

U.S. Marines with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 268 started conducting defensive weapon system training, April 2020.


Hmm... Not sure about training the gun using an XBox controller. Even in the demo it seemed to be rather jerky. IIRC using a mouse is banned on some online games because it gives too much of an advantage over players using thumb-based input. A trackball might be a better idea -they've been used in plenty of airframes.
 
I'm pretty sure USAF CV-22 have gone into "hot" LZ already.
Doubtless, but no-one has posted anything on it here on ARSE.

Japan is buying at least 17 Bell-Boeing MV-22Bs, the same tilt-rotor aircraft flown by the U.S.M.C. and is the first non-U.S. customer for the V-22. The first two delivered on the 8th of this month.

The Bell-Boeing Joint Program Office is now working on a $4 billion multiyear contract to build 39 CMV-22B aircraft for the U.S. Navy, 14 MV-22B aircraft for the Marine Corps, one CV-22B for the Air Force and four MV-22Bs for Japan.


Meanwhile some idle fun watching how versatile its been in service. For something that was highly doubted in the beginning its definitely become well respected as it matured.

 
Last edited:

mcphee1948

War Hero
A thing that has always interested me about the V-22 Osprey, is why it has (as Resasi mentions in his OP), "large helicopter-like propellers/rotors". They are strikingly portrayed in the dramatic picture incorporated in Resasi's post #12.

Those huge, crude, whirling rotors look a fearful danger to the troops on the ground, and anyone else in the vicinity.

Why can't they be replaced by a pair of compact turbofan engines of equivalent thrust?
 
A thing that has always interested me about the V-22 Osprey, is why it has (as Resasi mentions in his OP), "large helicopter-like propellers/rotors". They are strikingly portrayed in the dramatic picture incorporated in Resasi's post #12.

Those huge, crude, whirling rotors look a fearful danger to the troops on the ground, and anyone else in the vicinity.

Why can't they be replaced by a pair of compact turbofan engines of equivalent thrust?
In terms of danger, big rotors have got nothing on the sort of concentrated thrust you’d get out the back of a turbofan.
 
Not sure that a super hot concentrated plume of thrust is what you want when doing a vertical landing in various types of LZ.
 

Mattb

LE
Catching up with Dale Brown's "Hammerheads" book about twenty years late (ish). He had an armed Osprey as the cover girl on that book's jacket cover.
If I remember the book, I think he suggested putting Hellfires on the side of the fuselage too
 
A thing that has always interested me about the V-22 Osprey, is why it has (as Resasi mentions in his OP), "large helicopter-like propellers/rotors". They are strikingly portrayed in the dramatic picture incorporated in Resasi's post #12.

Those huge, crude, whirling rotors look a fearful danger to the troops on the ground, and anyone else in the vicinity.

Why can't they be replaced by a pair of compact turbofan engines of equivalent thrust?
They did get syfied about 25 years ago….of note the chin gun

11937463_693737790726378_4579356921983079833_o.jpg
 

Latest Threads

Top