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USMC Training Accident - 30 Jul 2020

A bad day for the Corps. RIP to the 9 personnel lost.
  • The I Marine Expeditionary Force tweeted on August 2 that searching would cease for the eight service members who went missing after an amphibious assault vehicle sank off the coast of California.
  • The accident took place during a routine training exercise near the island of San Clemente on July 30, according to the US Marine Corps.
  • One marine was already found dead, and the eight missing service members are now also presumed deceased.
  • A statement says that there is "little probability of a successful rescue given the circumstances of the incident."

E2A: Ranging in age from 18 to 22, the service members killed in the incident were Pfc. Bryan J. Baltierra, Pfc. Evan A. Bath, Pfc. Jack-Ryan Ostrovsky, Lance Cpl. Marco A. Barranco, Lance Cpl. Guillermo S. Perez, Lance Cpl. Chase D. Sweetwood, Cpl. Wesley A. Rodd, Cpl. Cesar A. Villanueva and Navy Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Christopher Gnem.
 
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ABNredleg

War Hero
RIP to the fallen. Hopefully the Amtracs will be replaced with something much newer and better in the future.
BAE was awarded a contract in 2018 for a wheeled replacement. The current Amtracs were rebuilt using the Bradley engine and suspension so materially they are in fairly good shape.
 
Apparently, it could have been even worse wrt loss of life.

'Eight troops missing after their landing craft sank off the Southern California coast during a training exercise are presumed dead, the Marine Corps announced Sunday. The Marines said they had called off the search that started late Thursday afternoon when the amphibious assault vehicle sank with 15 Marines and one Navy sailor aboard. Eight Marines were rescued, but one later died and two are in critical condition.'

 
I always remember the hair on my neck standing up when I first saw the Amtraks launching in the Invasion sequence of "Heartbreak Ridge". Quite an alarming concept, even at a remove.
 
Spent 45 mn in an Amtrack going from USS Kearsarge to the French coast.

Not the best time of my life between the water coming from the top hatch when the Amtrack left the ship and was submerged for a short while to the deafening noise and the smell of Diesel.

To top it off, the first Marine out slipped on the ramp and damaged his ankle to the amusement of the SEALs who had done the beach recce and were waiting for the landing in folding chairs...
 
I always remember the hair on my neck standing up when I first saw the Amtraks launching in the Invasion sequence of "Heartbreak Ridge". Quite an alarming concept, even at a remove.

Provided you can suppress the adversary's AD, STOM via rotary assets seems a much less risky option, although unless you're VDV, you will lack mech/armoured support which an LVTP provides (assuming it makes it to the beach).
 
Vehicle and bodies have been located; USN will attempt to recover the fallen.
 
Why dont they leave the rear ramp fully closed down, and then if the vehicle commander after a few minutes observation deems it safe then open up ?

I get that these accidents don't happen often but this does appear such a pointless accident. They would derive more training going into closed down state then choosing to change.
 
The consequences: swift and bold.

'The U.S. Marine Corps has fired the commander in charge of the unit involved in a deadly training accident off the coast of Southern California in July that killed eight Marines and a Navy sailor. The service members drowned after their amphibious assault vehicle sank during training on San Clemente Island.

"Lt. Gen. Karsten S. Heckl, Commanding General, I Marine Expeditionary Force, relieved Lt. Col. Michael J. Regner, Commanding Officer, Battalion Landing Team, 1st Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit today," said a Marine Corps statement Tuesday.

"Heckl relieved Regner due to a loss in trust and confidence in his ability to command as a result of the assault amphibious vehicle mishap that took place off the coast of Southern California July 30, 2020," it added.'


 
The consequences: swift and bold.

'The U.S. Marine Corps has fired the commander in charge of the unit involved in a deadly training accident off the coast of Southern California in July that killed eight Marines and a Navy sailor. The service members drowned after their amphibious assault vehicle sank during training on San Clemente Island.

"Lt. Gen. Karsten S. Heckl, Commanding General, I Marine Expeditionary Force, relieved Lt. Col. Michael J. Regner, Commanding Officer, Battalion Landing Team, 1st Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit today," said a Marine Corps statement Tuesday.

"Heckl relieved Regner due to a loss in trust and confidence in his ability to command as a result of the assault amphibious vehicle mishap that took place off the coast of Southern California July 30, 2020," it added.'



Great if the CO was personally responsible i.e. had put in place policies which increased the likelihood of an accident or failed to conduct sufficient inspections, but unduly harsh if that was not the case.
 
Great if the CO was personally responsible i.e. had put in place policies which increased the likelihood of an accident or failed to conduct sufficient inspections, but unduly harsh if that was not the case.

It seems to be the US way though; the CO buys the farm no matter what, in order for something to be seen to be done swiftly, even if then nothing further is actually done to rectify the situation. See US PACFLEET collisions of recent years.
 
It seems to be the US way though; the CO buys the farm no matter what, in order for something to be seen to be done swiftly, even if then nothing further is actually done to rectify the situation. See US PACFLEET collisions of recent years.

In which case, the system is condemned to repeat the same mistakes.
 
In which case, the system is condemned to repeat the same mistakes.

Well, it's not as if the US has a propensity for 'shoot first; ask questions later'. Gary Larson:

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