Army Rumour Service

Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

USMC Combat Engineers testing 3D Printer for major structures and shelters in concrete.

At Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton in southern California, the Marines built a shelter for a M142 HIMARS multiple launch rocket system in a day and half. They began by print four 26-by-13-by-15-foot arches, then assembled them together to create a single building. On small islands HIMARS vehicles will not be able with to manoeuvre away from enemy fire and will need protection to survive. Present USMC strategy with a smaller leaner Corps is to prepare for Island hopping, possibly in the South China Sea.

The Vulcan is ICON's next gen construction printer designed specifically to produce resilient single-story buildings fast. It has a footprint of a printing capability to approximately 2,000 square feet. It can print an 8.5-by-28-foot structure at a rate of 5 to 7 inches a second up to 2,000 square feet an adjustable width (to accommodate different slab sizes) it is is transported in a custom trailer with no assembly required.

The Vulcan features intuitive tablet-based controls, remote monitoring and support, onboard LED lighting for printing at night or during low-light conditions, and a custom software suite ensuring set-up, operations, and maintenance are as simple and straightforward as possible.

The fast curing Lavacrete that the giant Vulcan 3D print structure uses, is a fast curing cement-based mixture, used in its 3D concrete home printers. It is not just a typical building material but very strong, structurally sound, resilient, and resistant to time, natural disasters, and intense weather. It is ready for use in as little as 12 to 24 hours after printing with a strength rating of 6,000 psi.

Shelters made of Lavacrete can protect Marine Corps forces from artillery, rocket, and missile barrages, and could also be used to build fortifications, including aircraft shelters, bunkers, and revetments to store ordnance, supplies, and protect weapon systems.

The present experiment with the USMC combat engineers is part of a DIU Construction Scale Additive Manufacturing effort.(Defence Innovation Unit)

 

offog

LE
Saw a report about something similar in China about two years ago. They were looking at parts for prefab buildings.

edited to add
 
At Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton in southern California, the Marines built a shelter for a M142 HIMARS multiple launch rocket system in a day and half. They began by print four 26-by-13-by-15-foot arches, then assembled them together to create a single building. On small islands HIMARS vehicles will not be able with to manoeuvre away from enemy fire and will need protection to survive. Present USMC strategy with a smaller leaner Corps is to prepare for Island hopping, possibly in the South China Sea.

The Vulcan is ICON's next gen construction printer designed specifically to produce resilient single-story buildings fast. It has a footprint of a printing capability to approximately 2,000 square feet. It can print an 8.5-by-28-foot structure at a rate of 5 to 7 inches a second up to 2,000 square feet an adjustable width (to accommodate different slab sizes) it is is transported in a custom trailer with no assembly required.

The Vulcan features intuitive tablet-based controls, remote monitoring and support, onboard LED lighting for printing at night or during low-light conditions, and a custom software suite ensuring set-up, operations, and maintenance are as simple and straightforward as possible.

The fast curing Lavacrete that the giant Vulcan 3D print structure uses, is a fast curing cement-based mixture, used in its 3D concrete home printers. It is not just a typical building material but very strong, structurally sound, resilient, and resistant to time, natural disasters, and intense weather. It is ready for use in as little as 12 to 24 hours after printing with a strength rating of 6,000 psi.

Shelters made of Lavacrete can protect Marine Corps forces from artillery, rocket, and missile barrages, and could also be used to build fortifications, including aircraft shelters, bunkers, and revetments to store ordnance, supplies, and protect weapon systems.

The present experiment with the USMC combat engineers is part of a DIU Construction Scale Additive Manufacturing effort.(Defence Innovation Unit)

Not reinforced? Concrete hasn't much tensile strength - not ideal unless it is reinforced - i could well be missing something of course.
 
Not reinforced? Concrete hasn't much tensile strength - not ideal unless it is reinforced - i could well be missing something of course.

Yes, that occurred to me. Apparently Lavacrete consists of pulverized lava rock, cement and water. As such I can't imagine it offers much protection even from small arms fire.
 
Present USMC strategy with a smaller leaner Corps is to prepare for Island hopping, possibly in the South China Sea.

Interesting way to announce the US's next war.
 
Yes, that occurred to me. Apparently Lavacrete consists of pulverized lava rock, cement and water. As such I can't imagine it offers much protection even from small arms fire.
Agreed. And the psi rating probably makes sense as applying to concrete under compression.
I'm with you - i wouldn't want to shelter in anything unreinforced.
 

offog

LE
Yes, that occurred to me. Apparently Lavacrete consists of pulverized lava rock, cement and water. As such I can't imagine it offers much protection even from small arms fire.
Didn't the Romans make their concrete out of lava rock?
 
Didn't the Romans make their concrete out of lava rock?

Yep. The key to the longevity of Roman concrete structures appears to be salt water

 
Fibe years ago, ESA at Noordwijk (NL) experimented with 3D printed shelters made from simulated Mars rubble plus other stuff (weight-efficient setting agents?). The inside would have an airtight plastic liner expanded in to it and it was supposed to be the base structure for a manned Mars mission. Hopefully the planners weren't holding their breath when they designed the thing, but they weren't alone in the idea apparently.
 
Not reinforced? Concrete hasn't much tensile strength - not ideal unless it is reinforced - i could well be missing something of course.
Was Pykrete reinforced? Only by the sawdust, as I recall.

Simarly, fibre reinforcement has become fashionable. I'd imagine that it wouldn't be too difficult to incorporate fibres - using static charge perhaps - as the printer runs. Or why not print around a mesh?

As far as doing it, I suspect that it would be more practical to drop off prefabricated units.
 
Was Pykrete reinforced? Only by the sawdust, as I recall.

Simarly, fibre reinforcement has become fashionable. I'd imagine that it wouldn't be too difficult to incorporate fibres - using static charge perhaps - as the printer runs. Or why not print around a mesh?

As far as doing it, I suspect that it would be more practical to drop off prefabricated units.
Good questions. If reinforced by fibres, they would need to resist application of massive force at a specific small point. A large mass of unreinforced concrete won't always resist, and the fibres would need to be dense and widespread enough to absorb an impact.
I am not up to speed on recent developments so i could be wrong.
I agree about it being much easier/quicker to build a prefab structure: no need necessarily for a power source; huge gantry, cleared site for same, etc.
 

New Posts

Latest Threads

Top