Using the prefix Dr

#2
I believe you can call yourself doctor as long as you have a doctorate in any subject.
 

Forastero

LE
Moderator
#3
You don't need a medical degree to be a doctor, you could be a doctor of mathematics for example. That said, people who use the title when practising complementary therapies are, at worst, slightly misleading to the more gullible and best steered away from by those who know better. That screeching, Scottish harridan Gillian McKeith is one individual that springs to mind.
 
#4
Not just Drs of medicine out there and she doesn't claim to have it in medicine. DBAs and PhDs both use the honorary as well.

Saying that, I think I agree with your suspicion. Her Dr is more likely to be off the same standard that the hypnotist McKenna had his, to the scandal of all, a couple of years ago.

Here's one site that will mail it to you in just 7 days.

http://www.hilluniversity.com/Hill/online-degrees/online-doctorate.asp
 
#5
I received my Bachelor of Chiropractic Science and Masters of Chiropractic at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia.

Doesn't look like a PhD...
 
#6
I would guess (and it's only a guess, mind), looking at the faculty pages for her Aussie university, that she is entitled to call herself 'Dr' under the rules pertaining there.

I get the impression from a quick bit of googling (ah - displacement activity!) that the Aussies take the view that someone who has her qualifications is entitled to be regarded as a medic and use the same title as someone who did their degree in (say) medicine and surgery.

Linky

She's done five years study (similar to a UK medical degree), and the syllabus she's undertaken seems to suggest that she has done quite a lot of 'proper medicine' modules in her course.

This as opposed to 'Dr' McKeith whose PhD came, as I recall, from an unaccredited university whose course modules are not necessarily recognised as being er.... of an appropriate academic level by those specialising in the medical field.

On balance, I'd say that the chiropractor is probably entitled to use it - it seems that those with similar qualifications in Aus call themselves 'Dr' without any fuss.
 
#7
Chiropractors after five years at university( 2 in the uk and ireland to chose from) are bsc masters of chiropractic and are doctors of chiropractic, a title afforded to them because they can diagnose, treat certain neuro, and muscular skeletal disorders and can take and read x rays mri's ect. LM
 
#8
Doctor in the medical sense is a grace and favour title as they haven't actually completed a doctorate, it's a Bachelor's degree in medicine.

May well have a Phd or DPhil however. As has been said, different countries have different conventions eg in US some vets are known as Dr. as well.
 
#9
There's a fair chunk of us in the UK who do have a doctorate (mine's a D.Phil) as opposed to a medical degree. I think we are the ones that are allowed to call ourselves Dr, whilst we turn a blind eye to you medical johnnies and your honorary titles :wink:
 
#12
modernmajorgeneral said:
Are there any rules in the UK about people using this prefix if they do not appear to have a medical degree?
My mate has a PhD in control theory. He's also 6' 7" and looks like he should have been hung at Nurenberg.

If someone wishes to tell him he can't call himself Dr, I'll call the medic ...
 
#14
"On learning it was distasteful to the troops, Himmler wanted Nebe to come up with something less distressing. Nebe decided to try experimenting by murdering Soviet mental patients first with explosives near Minsk...."

8O
 
#15
Schleswig-Holstein said:
"On learning it was distasteful to the troops, Himmler wanted Nebe to come up with something less distressing. Nebe decided to try experimenting by murdering Soviet mental patients first with explosives near Minsk...."

8O
dad?
nah, too fuckng soft

neb
 
#16
psychobabble said:
Doctor in the medical sense is a grace and favour title as they haven't actually completed a doctorate, it's a Bachelor's degree in medicine.

May well have a Phd or DPhil however. As has been said, different countries have different conventions eg in US some vets are known as Dr. as well.
That's beacuse in the US, like medicine, vetinary medicine (and dentistry) are graduate degrees- 5 years after having already completed a bachelor's degree.

On the other hand, ambulance chasers (law school grads) are Doctors of Jurisprudence (JD) but do not refer to each other as Dr for some reason. (Virgil might be able to help on that point.)
 
#17
Crabtastic said:
On the other hand, ambulance chasers (law school grads) are Doctors of Jurisprudence (JD) but do not refer to each other as Dr for some reason. (Virgil might be able to help on that point.)
Having a J.D. (3 years of graduate education in Law) I could, I suppose, ask to be called Doctor.
The problem is that at cocktail parties, BBQ's etc you might be introduced to someone who assumes you are an MD and proceeds to describe all the complications they had following their haemorrhoid surgery. Yuck!
 
#18
DavidBOC said:
Crabtastic said:
On the other hand, ambulance chasers (law school grads) are Doctors of Jurisprudence (JD) but do not refer to each other as Dr for some reason. (Virgil might be able to help on that point.)
Having a J.D. (3 years of graduate education in Law) I could, I suppose, ask to be called Doctor.
The problem is that at cocktail parties, BBQ's etc you might be introduced to someone who assumes you are an MD and proceeds to describe all the complications they had following their haemorrhoid surgery. Yuck!
As opposed to them turning on their heels lest you try to bill them for the conversation? :)
 
#19
Generally, in the Western world, the title "Doctor" has come to denote a qualified physician - simply, it's a readily understood identifier of a licenced medical practitioner; one who has completed a recognised course of training allowing said person to conduct unsupervised diagnosis, treatment/ management of disease/ injury, and - crucially - exercise full prescribing rights. Others may exercise similar functions (eg some nurses, paramedics etc), but usually such rights are restricted in various ways, and often treatment is conducted under the remit of a supervising physician.

Titles of medical degrees vary by country - in N America it will be a "professional doctorate" (MD or DO for medics; DDS/DDM for dentists; DVM for vets). This is historical, and came about in the late C19th/ early C20th as part of a drive to standardise & improve American medical training (see The Flexnor Report, 1910) when it was decided that henceforth all medical school entrants should have at least 2 years college preparation; in reality, it soon became pretty much a given that all should have bachelors degrees. Because medical school was now a form of "graduate school", and because American medics were battling to enhance their social status, all preexisting medical degrees (usually following British practice - MB or "Licenctiate" etc ) were redesignated doctoral degrees; American lawyers have since done likewise - law school graduates hold the JD (Juris Doctor) degree. There are also DPMs - Doctors of Podiatric Medicine; DCs - Doctors of Chiropracty, and ODs - Doctors of Optometry, but only MDs & DOs are "comprehensive physicians" entitled to exercise full practice & prescribing rights on humans; DVMs do the same for beasts.

In Europe & elsewhere (eg Australasia, Asia) primary medical degrees tend not to be called doctorates - a term reserved to denote the highest academic degrees awarded for completion of independent research making a substantial & original contribution to knowledge. Again, this is historical; many British medical schools existed outside the universities, & students qualified via licencing exams conducted by the various colleges of physicians & surgeons. The MD was a higher university degree awarded for research publications, not a primary medical qualification. Thus when all medical schools were eventually integrated into the universities the basic medical degree was termed "bachelor".

So in Britain, and countries following the British tradition, medical degrees are usually called "Bachelor of Medicine & Surgery": MB,BS/ BM,BS/ MB,ChB/BM,BChir, and sometimes just plain BM or BMed - exact nomenclature varies by university, but they all mean the same. Dentists are BDS/ BChD; vets - BVetMed, BVSc or something similar. German doctors usually hold "StaatsExamMed"; French - "Licence en Med"; Italians - "Laurea Medicale" etc etc. In most European countries (plus in India, Australasia etc) the degree of Doctor of Medicine (MD or DrMed etc) is usually only held by a qualified physician who has completed doctoral level research in clinical medicine; academic medics whose research is in medical science rather than clinical medicine (eg pharmacology, physiology, biochemistry, microbiology etc) tend to hold PhDs/ DPhils.

Holders of any of the above mentioned degrees may legitimately call themselves "Doctor", but in the academic world it is decidedly naff to use the title unless holding a recognised doctoral level research degree - eg PhD, MD, DEng, EdD etc.. Conversely, it is unwise for said academics to style themselves "Doctor" in general social situations/ out & about because people tend to assume this means you're a medic, and a PhD in Outer Mongolian Basket Weaving or French Literature probably will not be able to bring much to the table when Uncle Monty has a coronary!

Finally, it's worth noting that originally the title "Doctor" was used in the ancient European universities to indicate quite simply a learned teacher; most gratifyingly in Italy today it is still quite common for school pupils to address their teachers as "Dottore". In fact, in Britain, anyone can choose to call themselves "Doctor" if they wish - there's no law against it per se. The offence, if & when it exists, is either forging academic credentials, or pretending to be a qualified medical practitioner when you are not.
 
#20
crabtastic said:
DavidBOC said:
Crabtastic said:
On the other hand, ambulance chasers (law school grads) are Doctors of Jurisprudence (JD) but do not refer to each other as Dr for some reason. (Virgil might be able to help on that point.)
Having a J.D. (3 years of graduate education in Law) I could, I suppose, ask to be called Doctor.
The problem is that at cocktail parties, BBQ's etc you might be introduced to someone who assumes you are an MD and proceeds to describe all the complications they had following their haemorrhoid surgery. Yuck!
As opposed to them turning on their heels lest you try to bill them for the conversation? :)
Crabby, I would not dream of giving legal advice at a cocktail party. It is too hard to keep track of billable time in the usual 6 minute increments.

Actually I work for a government agency and do not engage in private practice. If I give advice about my area of law I am probably in conflict of interest and if I gave advice about other areas I might make a mistake and get sued. This would require dealing with another lawyer and dealing with lawyers can be a horrible, horrible experience.
 

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