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Using middle name as surname?

How about 2LT Wales, who turned up at his troop with a different name tag to his very well known real name?
Was he in a British uniform?
 

BratMedic

LE
Book Reviewer
Thank your lucky stars that you weren't called this:
Leone Sextus Denys Oswolf Fraudatifilius Tollemache-Tollemache de Orellana Plantagenet Tollemache-Tollemache
On the outbreak of the First World War, he was sent to France on the Union-Castle steamer SS Braemar Castle in September 1914. He kept a personal diary of his experiences. In 1916, Leone was seconded to serve as brigade major in the 3rd Australian Infantry Brigade of the 1st Australian Division after it was redeployed from Gallipoli to the Somme. He died on active service on 20 February 1917 from double pneumonia. He is buried in the communal war cemetery in Dernancourt near Albert.

Leone's elder brother Leo (Quintus Tollemache-Tollemache de Orellana Plantagenet) also served in France, in the 1st Battalion of the Lincolnshire Regiment. He went missing, presumed killed, on 1 November 1914 and his body was never found. He is commemorated on the Menin Gate memorial.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
Thank your lucky stars that you weren't called this:
Leone Sextus Denys Oswolf Fraudatifilius Tollemache-Tollemache de Orellana Plantagenet Tollemache-Tollemache
On the outbreak of the First World War, he was sent to France on the Union-Castle steamer SS Braemar Castle in September 1914. He kept a personal diary of his experiences. In 1916, Leone was seconded to serve as brigade major in the 3rd Australian Infantry Brigade of the 1st Australian Division after it was redeployed from Gallipoli to the Somme. He died on active service on 20 February 1917 from double pneumonia. He is buried in the communal war cemetery in Dernancourt near Albert.

Leone's elder brother Leo (Quintus Tollemache-Tollemache de Orellana Plantagenet) also served in France, in the 1st Battalion of the Lincolnshire Regiment. He went missing, presumed killed, on 1 November 1914 and his body was never found. He is commemorated on the Menin Gate memorial.
Body was never found, or family couldn't afford two gravestones?
 
Bit like the Chinese kids when I was at school - James and Billy and a Japanese lad we called 'ABC'.
We had a lad from the Hong Kong regiment attached to us for a few days. He didn’t speak any English and just stood around smiling happily but he liked being in my Fox turret.

He was known as “The Chink in the Armour”.
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
Pte M******* (polish sounding name, a woman who had joined the army from an alleged pole dancing background - I strongly suspect she wasn't a pole dancer but was in 'an allied trade' or was a 'pole' dancer) became 'Pte Magic'

Trooper Honeybun was called Trp H by us as no matter how you try and shout "Honeybun, get your shagging heels together!*" across a parade square it just sounded gay. Try it.

I forget the name of the lad we just called 'Alphabet'

Pte Ben L********d went for commissioning. During the process it was discovered he was actually a Benjamin, and his surname was hyphenated. L********d-H******n. He failed, one story was he was allegedly caught at a wedding in 2's (or possibly 1's) with an (unearned) dagger on the sleeve.
On returning to unit his name tape was a thing of beauty. It just made him stand out on parade more than the rest of us, which was good.


*I used to hide in the Troop Sjts office overlooking the square so I could snigger at this. Every now and again I'd get a "**** off Cpl Toppers, stop laughing"
 
Or McFuckwit as two successive OCs of 15 Coy (later B Coy) 4 PARA were known as.

The latter of the pair also carried the nickname of “white van man” as he was too old, fat and lazy to tab with the blokes and went everywhere in white fleet.
We had, ‘The Good-Ideas Fairy’ and ‘The Hummingbird.’
One just invented ridiculous ideas, some of which were very nearly lethal when the Coy was on H15.
The other used to hover around in the outskirts of conversations, swoop in, micro manage, come up with the wrong answer because he didn’t really understand what was going on, make life infinitely more difficult then fcuk off to cause another calamity.

Just go with your normal name, depending on how the blokes regard, you may or may not receive a nickname.
 
We had, ‘The Good-Ideas Fairy’ and ‘The Hummingbird.’
One just invented ridiculous ideas, some of which were very nearly lethal when the Coy was on H15.
The other used to hover around in the outskirts of conversations, swoop in, micro manage, come up with the wrong answer because he didn’t really understand what was going on, make life infinitely more difficult then fcuk off to cause another calamity.

I think almost every regiment in the Army has those.
 
We had a guy with a completely unpronounceable Polish type surname.
Universally known as Cpl A to Z.

We had a Cpl XYZ for the same reason
 

XPara Mugg

War Hero
Trooper Honeybun was called Trp H by us as no matter how you try and shout "Honeybun, get your shagging heels together!*" across a parade square it just sounded gay. Try it.
ore than the rest of us, which was good.
Once had exactly this problem. But times two!

We had two brothers of (I believe) Italian extraction called A****da. One changed his name for family inheritance reasons to a double barrelled and anglicised Honeybun- A****d. All was OK with this, in fact it made thing simpler. One was known as Honeybun and the other as A****da. Until.....

We were doing a bit of a PR thing, part supporting a local charity, part recruiting, that sort of thing. It involved abseiling down a reasonably high church tower. Many sponsored abseilers, families, church congregation, charity supporters, press and local radio. Sponsored locals made their way up the winding stone steps to the top of the tower and went down the outside on a rope. Each, once on the ground, then handed their helmet to one of the blokes (Honeybun) and a bunch of these were attached to a rope and hauled up for the next group of danglers.

This went well until I found myself at the top with a backlog of bareheaded individuals waiting for their turn. A quick glance over the side reveals a slack hauling rope, a pile of helmets and Honeybun chatting merrily to members of the assembled throng.

This resulted in me (fully aware of the sensitive nature of the crowd) calling down from about 70ft up:

"Honeybun, put the helmets on the rope." (Pause)

"Honeybun, put the helmets on the rope (Pause and many puzzled upturned faces)

"
Honeybun!" (Meaningful pause understood by all my soldiers - except, of course, the still chatting Honeybun)

With rictus grin and through gritted teeth:
"Honeybun!"

Me, with a feeling of resignation and sotto voce: "F**k it"

Then, "Arnolda, tell your brother to put the helmets on the rope."

The crowd remained somewhat confused as to why a Parachute Regiment Sgt Maj was addressing his soldiers as honeybun :pounce:.

Sadly, there was no opportunity to explain. :rolleyes:
 
Met a Mauger, pronounced 'major;. Shades of Catch-22.

Knew an officer who double barreled their name upon marriage. You're not wrong with whatever you're thinking now!

Heard a tale of an OCdt who changed their surname to have a third crack at TA RMAS but got rumbled in the third and final week. Changed an A to an I as the first letter of a biblical name.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
Once had exactly this problem. But times two!

We had two brothers of (I believe) Italian extraction called A****da. One changed his name for family inheritance reasons to a double barrelled and anglicised Honeybun- A****d. All was OK with this, in fact it made thing simpler. One was known as Honeybun and the other as A****da. Until.....

We were doing a bit of a PR thing, part supporting a local charity, part recruiting, that sort of thing. It involved abseiling down a reasonably high church tower. Many sponsored abseilers, families, church congregation, charity supporters, press and local radio. Sponsored locals made their way up the winding stone steps to the top of the tower and went down the outside on a rope. Each, once on the ground, then handed their helmet to one of the blokes (Honeybun) and a bunch of these were attached to a rope and hauled up for the next group of danglers.

This went well until I found myself at the top with a backlog of bareheaded individuals waiting for their turn. A quick glance over the side reveals a slack hauling rope, a pile of helmets and Honeybun chatting merrily to members of the assembled throng.

This resulted in me (fully aware of the sensitive nature of the crowd) calling down from about 70ft up:

"Honeybun, put the helmets on the rope." (Pause)

"Honeybun, put the helmets on the rope (Pause and many puzzled upturned faces)

"
Honeybun!" (Meaningful pause understood by all my soldiers - except, of course, the still chatting Honeybun)

With rictus grin and through gritted teeth:
"Honeybun!"

Me, with a feeling of resignation and sotto voce: "F**k it"

Then, "Arnolda, tell your brother to put the helmets on the rope."

The crowd remained somewhat confused as to why a Parachute Regiment Sgt Maj was addressing his soldiers as honeybun :pounce:.

Sadly, there was no opportunity to explain. :rolleyes:
Sorry but I'm chuckling just as much at how you went from 'A****da' at the top of the story to 'Arnolda' towards the end.

Was it for P**S*C reasons? :-D
 
Met a Mauger, pronounced 'major;. Shades of Catch-22.

Knew an officer who double barreled their name upon marriage. You're not wrong with whatever you're thinking now!

Heard a tale of an OCdt who changed their surname to have a third crack at TA RMAS but got rumbled in the third and final week. Changed an A to an I as the first letter of a biblical name.
Would he have passed?
 

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