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Using middle name as surname?

Don't bother. You will end up with at least two nicknames - one from the Officers' Mess and at least one from the rest of the unit. They may or may not overlap. The rest of the time it will be first name or Sir.

We had "Swiss Tony", "Half man, half doss bag", "Noodles" and many more besides.
As long as you don't end up with the nickname "TCX" where X is the initial of your Surname.
 

The_Duke

LE
Moderator
Or McFuckwit as two successive OCs of 15 Coy (later B Coy) 4 PARA were known as.

The latter of the pair also carried the nickname of “white van man” as he was too old, fat and lazy to tab with the blokes and went everywhere in white fleet.
 
Then find yourself unable to get credit and vetting take forever

I changed my surname when I was 19 and never had an issue with getting credit or security vetting. It's just one more bit if paper work you have to provide.

However, it is a utter ball ache to update banks and services when you make the change and it puts the extended families nose out if joint.

It does not matter what you are called in the army, you will still have the pissed ripped out of you.
 
I realise this is an odd one, just a shower thought. I'm in the process of applying as an officer, waiting on some things.

I got to wondering; I have an unusual surname which it seems everybody finds their own pronunciation of, but a middle name which everyone can pronounce (and sounds a lot better!). Would it be possible to go by this as an officer, rather than my surname, without legally changing it?

Cheers!

You could do the opposite and use your surname as a first name. This will be no easier to pronounce but it should make you sound posher.
 
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Friend of mine is called 'usual spelling' as this is reply when asked how to spell his totally unpronounceable Polish surname: Chrząszcz
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
Or McFuckwit as two successive OCs of 15 Coy (later B Coy) 4 PARA were known as.

The latter of the pair also carried the nickname of “white van man” as he was too old, fat and lazy to tab with the blokes and went everywhere in white fleet.
Cpl Sumo was dropped at the CFT/BFT finish by Bedford
 
Or McFuckwit as two successive OCs of 15 Coy (later B Coy) 4 PARA were known as.

The latter of the pair also carried the nickname of “white van man” as he was too old, fat and lazy to tab with the blokes and went everywhere in white fleet.

Weren't you an OC?

In 4 para?
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
I know a Latvian bloke called Hamish.

Turns out his real name (something like “Eimantas” but with loads of squiggly bits above the vowels) is completely unpronounceable so he just decided to start calling himself Hamish because he liked it.

Fair enough.
 
£42.44. Change your legal name to make your middle name your surname, and your current surname to become your new middle name. Job jobbed. No need to thank me.
Or change it the the last three letters of you car number plate and you have a cheap private plate
 
I changed my surname when I was 19 and never had an issue with getting credit or security vetting. It's just one more bit if paper work you have to provide.

However, it is a utter ball ache to update banks and services when you make the change and it puts the extended families nose out if joint.

It does not matter what you are called in the army, you will still have the pissed ripped out of you.
It's even more of a ball ache when it comes to vetting, as noted by an acquaintance. The juice of that little lemon is very much not worth the squeeze.
 
I know a Latvian bloke called Hamish.

Turns out his real name (something like “Eimantas” but with loads of squiggly bits above the vowels) is completely unpronounceable so he just decided to start calling himself Hamish because he liked it.

Fair enough.
Bit like the Chinese kids when I was at school - James and Billy and a Japanese lad we called 'ABC'.
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Bit like the Chinese kids when I was at school - James and Billy and a Japanese lad we called 'ABC'.

Yep. I used to work with a guy who’s first name was Wai-Hong.

We all called him Paul.
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
My surname is actually the result of something very similar.

My great great grandparents were German immigrants with a very German sounding three syllable surname.

When my great grandfather joined the Army in 1916 he anglicised it for obvious reasons. Basically removing a load of letters to make it sound more British.
 
I wonder how m


You could do the opposite and use your surname as a first name. This will be no easier to pronounce but it should make you sound posher.
A REME lad did that, he is on here......just saying (it doesn't)
 
Yep. I used to work with a guy who’s first name was Wai-Hong.

We all called him Paul.
This the guy?
9B55BE6D-E30C-4A82-91A8-2038A35630D8.jpeg
 
My surname is actually the result of something very similar.

My great great grandparents were German immigrants with a very German sounding three syllable surname.

When my great grandfather joined the Army in 1916 he anglicised it for obvious reasons. Basically removing a load of letters to make it sound more British.
How did you get 'Ravers' from 'Heil-Hitler'?
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
A certain Lieutenant with the DLI called de la Billière wasn’t convinced of his Geordie soldiers’ ability to pronounce his surname.

It was Lieutenant Smith who led his troops into action in Korea...
 

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