Using criminal and military skills together.

Class 66

War Hero
Google tells me it was the scene of an attempted robbed nearly two years ago. Having failed, the suspects went onto another shop and robbed it instead.
Where you the one in the hi viz coat? Do you have any further information?
You can call Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111 or through their website.
1980.
 
Every cook,storeman and ration clerk ever, in plain sight. No equal when it came to robbing and done with the complete knowledge of their comrades.
 
Cpl Andrew Walker signed out a SMG from the armoury in order to ambush a military payroll in 1985.
He killed the three soldiers escorting the payroll and took the £19,000 which incidentally was never recovered.

BBC News - Triple killer Andrew Walker released from jail
What was £19k in 1985? Cupla years wages. Even if he had got away with it, he was hardly going to retire to the sunshine. I hope he ends up on the streets

Pentland Hills triple killer takes secret of buried Army payroll to the grave.

Released early on compassionate grounds as he only had months to live according to medics. Died ten years later in his care home. @Auld-Yin
 

Auld-Yin

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To quote George Orwell:

"Moreover, they had been at war and were coming home with the soldier's attitude to life, which is
fundamentally, in spite of discipline, a lawless attitude."
 

Auld-Yin

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Did you know him or any of the victims or was it after your time?
No, he was in the Bn same time as me, different Company though, thankfully.
 
No truth either
It's one of the oldest thieving techniques going and is or was well known to local old bill in 80s and 90s.
I realise I'm replying to a more than a year old post but my family were hoteliers and would make bets with the police when something went missing as to where the cleaner had hidden it.
Everytime it was under the mattress as anywhere else would be found by the owner.
By all counts about 15 cleaners left work in handcuffs over the years.
 

Sarastro

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Of course, if there are any stories like this in 20 years time about today or recent decades, they will all involve RAF Cpls and people who previously resided in Cheltenham.

The best the Army can offer is minor fraud and sexual assault. Not really the stuff of which legends are made, or fortunes.
 
It's one of the oldest thieving techniques going and is or was well known to local old bill in 80s and 90s.
I realise I'm replying to a more than a year old post but my family were hoteliers and would make bets with the police when something went missing as to where the cleaner had hidden it.
Everytime it was under the mattress as anywhere else would be found by the owner.
By all counts about 15 cleaners left work in handcuffs over the years.

Low paid job that puts temptation in the way of people who usually aren't very bright and often have money problems.

There are similar issues with carers. All a bit sad really.
 

Fang_Farrier

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I am currently struggling with the concept of an unmanned and unlocked work stationery cupboard.

In all my years I have never heard of such a thing.

Any other previous work place and it would have been stripped bare by the staff
 

Chef

LE
I am currently struggling with the concept of an unmanned and unlocked work stationery cupboard.

In all my years I have never heard of such a thing.

Any other previous work place and it would have been stripped bare by the staff
There's a textbook on the subject:

My first taste of power, stationary monitor at school aged 10. I had to resign when my plans to invade Poland were discovered, chiz chiz.
 

Daxx

MIA
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I am currently struggling with the concept of an unmanned and unlocked work stationery cupboard.

In all my years I have never heard of such a thing.

Any other previous work place and it would have been stripped bare by the staff
At a unit I worked at, a couple of staff moved on to another unit location not far away. The new incumbent came for a chat along the lines of, 'they took a bit of stationery with them, not sure what to do', I replied with 'invite them to return it, or I'll get my warrant card out of the drawer'.

We got 2 full bin bags of assorted stationery back......
 
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There used to be a call to attend Bulford Camp most monday mornings when the RP's used to ping the cars on the car park without car passes. Most had been nicked as transport back to camp from Salisbury, Bournemouth and other nearby towns.

Late 70's/early 80's I spent every monday for around three months there fingerprinting cars when I did a scenes of crime attachment. The boss (ex-RAF Sgt now a detective Sgt) spent forever trying to convince the CO of Bulford to let him fingerprint the troops as that would bring the theft rate markedly down. The CO pointblank refused.........I think he was shit scared half his blokes would get pinged for most of the car thefts in the south west along with a fair bit of burglary.
I knew our paths had crossed!
 
That was the bloke who wrote in that book about carrying out a secret underwater survey on the Soviet Battle Cruiser Kiev on behalf of naval intelligence while she was docked in Gibraltar on a visit in 1979. AKA Lt Cmdr Buster Crabb.

A really remarkable achievement as according to Janes 'Fighting Ships' the Kiev didn't come into service until 1981. I took the rest of the book with a large cellar of salt.
That’s interesting.
Kiev entered the Med in the summer of 1976.
I was flying as supernumerary crew on the 201 Sqn (based at RAF Luqa) Grimsod, tooling around off Crete, that pinged her, dropped to v low level over the oggin, and I stood behind the photographer at the open port-side obs blister, as he fired off rolls of film.
Interestingly, at Head Crab’s next Monday morning prayers, he changed his narrative from the well-worn ‘When British forces finally leave Malta ...’ to ‘IF British forces leave Malta ...’
 

Mr_Baiter

War Hero
I joined up with two bezzies, one of whom went concrete company & subsequently 3PARA SP Coy slop jockey. Few years after he got out he looked me up & asked me to be the driver for him & a cpl of oppos who were knocking over post offices & building societies in the west country. I told him to feck off & passed on the info to a cousin of mine who was a DS with merseyside plod.
The errant shitbag was scaring the crap out of poor civvies waving a sawn off in their faces while nicking a few poxy grand. Not a nice way of doing business. His old man was fine upstanding pillar type too......spent a long & good career with a great rep in the Prison Service. How my mate ended up stooping to that sort of level I have no idea, he wasn't poor before he went to crime.

Their MO was to drive a hire car from the north west down to north dorset/somerset. Hole up in a quiet B&B, drive down into cornwall, devon, south coast devon, do 3 or 4 locations over a week & then come back. This was in the early 90s before the explosion of CCTV & traffic cams. Dunno if he ever got caught but I hope so.
In 1989 my father had a break in and his shotgun was nicked - nothing else. in the early 90s the shotgun was recovered having been sawn off and used in post office robberies around the South West. I wonder of any connection?

Hilariously it was a rather good London made shotgun left to him by his uncle and would probably have been worth enough on its own, if not sawn off, to make the post office jobs look a bit small time.

If it is the same shotgun - which would be an extraordinary coincidence then yes - the perps got found guilty and did quite long stretches I think.
 
Lots of hiding places on a warship.

Of course there is also a huge amount of low level thievery of Naval Stores. Stonehouse car boot sale used to have a bloke there every week
Oh no - I bought shed loads of tools from car boot sales in the 80s. And some diving gear *.

Better check if they have any arrows on........

A friend has just asked if there is a statute of limitation in the UK?


* There used to be at least one place in Plymouth (and one in Glasgow) where allegedly ex-RN diving gear, slightly used, was available!
 

Ravers

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Oh no - I bought shed loads of tools from car boot sales in the 80s. And some diving gear *.

Better check if they have any arrows on........

A friend has just asked if there is a statute of limitation in the UK?


* There used to be at least one place in Plymouth (and one in Glasgow) where allegedly ex-RN diving gear, slightly used, was available!
There is of course the classic dit about the dockyard welder in Guzz. I’m sure we’ve all heard this one before in one form or another, but it’s a goodun so here we go again….

Some years back there was a welder who worked in Plymouth dockyard. Everyday after work he’d drive out of the yard with his car and trailer and get searched.

They knew he was up to something because he was a bit shifty and people had noticed stuff going missing from the place he worked. His car was also way too nice for someone on a dockyard welder’s salary.

But still, everyday he’d drive out of the yard with his car and trailer and they never found anything that was remotely suspect.

The bloke was doing it for years. No one ever caught him.

Turned out he was knocking up trailers at work, using material robbed from the dockyard and selling them on for a tidy sum.

*replace Guzz dockyard for Cold War Berlin and replace trailer for bicycle for a completely new and exciting dit.
 
That’s interesting.
Kiev entered the Med in the summer of 1976.
I was flying as supernumerary crew on the 201 Sqn (based at RAF Luqa) Grimsod, tooling around off Crete, that pinged her, dropped to v low level over the oggin, and I stood behind the photographer at the open port-side obs blister, as he fired off rolls of film.
Interestingly, at Head Crab’s next Monday morning prayers, he changed his narrative from the well-worn ‘When British forces finally leave Malta ...’ to ‘IF British forces leave Malta ...’
Sorry I meant the Kirov, Battlecruiser.

The lead ship of the class, Kirov (renamed Admiral Ushakov in 1992), was laid down in June 1973 at Leningrad's Baltiysky Naval Shipyard, launched on 27 December 1977 and commissioned on 30 December 1980. When she appeared for the first time in 1981, NATO observers called her BALCOM I (Baltic Combatant I). She is currently in reserve.
 

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