Use contactless cards?

Blogg

LE
If so, in this happy seasonal spending binge fest, you may find your card bring bounced by some retailers even though it is valid and not maxed out.

Visa & Mastercard have dropped their contactless floor limits to zero, which means all transactions must be authorised.

In many cases low value transactions were authorised automatically by retailers point of sale terminal even if Coms. with the Visa or Mastercard mothership had temporarily dropped out.

How do I know this? Thanks to scenes of utter panic and distress: cashless society hipsters denied their coffee in a Costa coffee shop this morning.
 
Sweden will grind to a halt without Fika now they've gone almost cashless
 
If so, in this happy seasonal spending binge fest, you may find your card bring bounced by some retailers even though it is valid and not maxed out.

Visa & Mastercard have dropped their contactless floor limits to zero, which means all transactions must be authorised.

In many cases low value transactions were authorised automatically by retailers point of sale terminal even if Coms. with the Visa or Mastercard mothership had temporarily dropped out.

How do I know this? Thanks to scenes of utter panic and distress: cashless society hipsters denied their coffee in a Costa coffee shop this morning.
Not quite correct, reasons are here:

The new rules which mean your card could be declined for no reason

I had my card declined in Asda on Friday, after using it OK in multiple places.
 

OneTenner

Old-Salt
I refuse to have contactless, the bank I use (Nationwide) have a non-contactless option and i've 'secured' my credit card (Barclays - they don't have a non-contactless option) by using a 0.3mm PCB drill to cut the antenna, filling the hole with suitably coloured epoxy.
Yes, I know you can get the sleeves / shields to go in your wallet, doesn't stop it being used if your wallet is stolen though
I also have a tinfoil Google hat..... :cool:
 
How do I know this? Thanks to scenes of utter panic and distress: cashless society hipsters denied their coffee in a Costa coffee shop this morning.
Obviously the coffee shop and it’s punters never lived through the dark days of 'chip & pin’.
 
I refuse to have contactless, the bank I use (Nationwide) have a non-contactless option and i've 'secured' my credit card (Barclays - they don't have a non-contactless option) by using a 0.3mm PCB drill to cut the antenna, filling the hole with suitably coloured epoxy.
Yes, I know you can get the sleeves / shields to go in your wallet, doesn't stop it being used if your wallet is stolen though
I also have a tinfoil Google hat..... :cool:
Good thinking... that little hole, filled with suitably coloured epoxy will stop the credit card thief spending £150 in ≤ £30 purchase.

Those much bigger 'customer not present’ types of purchase though... will it work for them?

Either way, you’re largely covered by the card issuer against loss following genuine theft and/or fraudulent misuse of your card.



Grandad, is that you back from the 1970's already?
 

Blogg

LE
Not quite correct, reasons are here:

The new rules which mean your card could be declined for no reason

I had my card declined in Asda on Friday, after using it OK in multiple places.
That's a bit different: card bounced after multiple uses without putting in a PIN.

This new one simply means if a retail outlet has lost the connection to their payment processor even a first time transaction for £0.01 will be bounced.

While ago Visa card network crashed on a Friday afternoon. In London near enough the end of days.

We do some work for payment processing outfits and what we see and are told is a huge and quite fragile network of connections between retailers, merchant acquirers, processing outfits, card schemes and banks, some still running really ropey legacy systems and all being asked to do more and more.
 
I've noticed that when you pay by contactless (especially in pubs and restaurants) there seems to be an assumption that you do not want a receipt. If they even bother asking, they seem somewhat surprised if you say yes.

Why should a contactless transaction be seen any differently from one where you put in your PIN?
 

OneTenner

Old-Salt
Those much bigger 'customer not present’ types of purchase though... will it work for them?

Either way, you’re largely covered by the card issuer against loss following genuine theft and/or fraudulent misuse of your card.
In my case yes - i've set up two-factor authentication, so unless they get my phone as well, find the PIN for that and the PIN for the 2FA app (which has been renamed to something else), i'm pretty safe.
One thing that does bother me is the proposal to use fingerprints - identification should never be used as authentication, many companies have trumpeted how their authentication systems using facial recognition, fingerprints, retina scans etc. are secure & foolproof, only to have been fooled, bypassed or hacked within days of the press release...
It's possible for a street gang to pressure me into revealing my card PIN and phone / 2FA PINs - which I would do, there's no point in escalating things for the sake of a few quid unless I was in a position I knew I could win, it would however, present significant hurdles to pickpockets & thieves, rather than feral street gangs.
I'm confident the layered security I have in place means i'm 'covered' not just 'largely covered' - banks appear to put the onus upon the customer to prove they haven't compromised their own account or card security, even though they know the scale of fraud is far greater than they will admit to.
 
First trip over the pond 6 years ago and I was surprised to see them at every shop I went in, signatures were never checked; which was just as well as I would have had to sign the back of the card as well.
On getting into Canada it was back to chip and pin.
 
A different type of contactless fraud is becoming very common in Europe now, especially here in Italy, and it may have already reached the UK.

The fraudster has a portable point of sale machine, and he or she sets it for a sale at the maximum permitted amount without authentication, places it in his or her bag, then goes around bumping the bag against other peoples hand/man bags until he or she strikes lucky, whereupon they re-arm the POS and repeat the process.

The banks refuse to refund the charged amount because the card has not been lost or stolen, and is still in the owner's possession.

RFID-proof wallets are essential.... or do as #OneTenner suggested and drill a hole in the antenna.
 
A different type of contactless fraud is becoming very common in Europe now, especially here in Italy, and it may have already reached the UK.

The fraudster has a portable point of sale machine, and he or she sets it for a sale at the maximum permitted amount without authentication, places it in his or her bag, then goes around bumping the bag against other peoples hand/man bags until he or she strikes lucky, whereupon they re-arm the POS and repeat the process.

The banks refuse to refund the charged amount because the card has not been lost or stolen, and is still in the owner's possession.

RFID-proof wallets are essential.... or do as #OneTenner suggested and drill a hole in the antenna.
Surely, the point of sale machine will have an authorised account with the credit card company. It wouldn't take long for it to be identified as a common point of purchase.? This is how we used to identify scams at service stations by the staff. They would use swipe cards, one after the other, all stolen but this was in the days before chip and pin.
 

Dredd

LE
I've noticed that when you pay by contactless (especially in pubs and restaurants) there seems to be an assumption that you do not want a receipt. If they even bother asking, they seem somewhat surprised if you say yes.

Why should a contactless transaction be seen any differently from one where you put in your PIN?
Because it costs them money.
 
Surely, the point of sale machine will have an authorised account with the credit card company. It wouldn't take long for it to be identified as a common point of purchase.? This is how we used to identify scams at service stations by the staff. They would use swipe cards, one after the other, all stolen but this was in the days before chip and pin.
You would have thought so, but it's happening. I don't know how they are doing it, but they are, and it's becoming more and more common here. It's possible that nobody complains to the bank because it's a fairly small amount, and they just imagine it's a purchase they've forgotten about. It's unlikely the perpetrator will hit the same person twice, and in a big city, just doing four or five a day, a thief could live quite well.
 
I still pack one of those for the outdoor events
I used to use a mobile reader with it's own sim card. usually it worked fine
 
You would have thought so, but it's happening. I don't know how they are doing it, but they are, and it's becoming more and more common here. It's possible that nobody complains to the bank because it's a fairly small amount, and they just imagine it's a purchase they've forgotten about. It's unlikely the perpetrator will hit the same person twice, and in a big city, just doing four or five a day, a thief could live quite well.
I don't doubt your story. What I am saying is that Visa/MC etc, would quickly identify the thieves account even if only 50% of the victims reported it. Not only that, but the tealeaves would be paying visa for the use of the pos machine so they or the owner of the pos, will be known to them.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
I used to use a mobile reader with it's own sim card. usually it worked fine
We have one, sadly some events won’t fund rebro masts and every Cnut using their mobile phone crashes the system
 
We have one, sadly some events won’t fund rebro masts and every Cnut using their mobile phone crashes the system
I was generally going to much smaller events, usually dog shows, village fetes, weddings and even a Donkey Derby.

I mustn't forget the Overlord Show
 

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